Vous êtes ici : Accueil / par_theme

Recherche multi-critères

Liste des résultats

Il y a 65 éléments qui correspondent à vos termes de recherche.
Writing on the self par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 14/11/2014
Critics and academics tend to draw a line between autobiography and fiction. However, it is sometimes difficult to make such a clear distinction between what is made up and what is not. Here are some short texts written by authors who reflect on their use of the first person.
exercice.png texte.png
Amitava Kumar: Immigritude par Amitava Kumar, publié le 25/10/2019
Every year, the English-speaking writers invited to the Assises Internationales du Roman write the definition of a word of their choice.
texte.png monographie.png
Rencontre avec Paul Auster et Siri Hustvedt par Paul Auster, Siri Hustvedt, Clifford Armion, publié le 13/02/2018
Le 17 janvier 2018, la Villa Gillet a permis à 9 classes de lycée de rencontrer les auteurs Paul Auster et Siri Hustvedt. Les questions portaient principalement sur les nombreux écrits de Siri Hustvedt ainsi que le dernier roman de Paul Auster, 4, 3, 2, 1.
son.png texte.png entretien.png
Taiye Selasi: On Emotions par Taiye Selasi, publié le 31/08/2015
How do writers succeed in submerging us in situations so unlike our own lives? I would argue that, as a reader, I have yet to encounter a situation in literature "unlike" my life. The demographic details may differ: Charlotte is a spider, I am a human; Teju Cole's narrators are men, I am a woman; many of Toni Morrison's characters are mothers, I am not. The list of things that I am not is long: white, male, a parent, a soldier, Chinese-speaking, South American, a witness to any war.
article.png
For Free Union in Criticism par Pierre Bayard, publié le 14/02/2012
The idea of attributing old works to new authors is not original. It has long been practiced by those lovers of literature, our students, who do not hesitate to attribute The Old Man and the Sea to Melville or War and Peace to Dostoevsky. What is interesting is that this kind of reinvention is not always properly appreciated by teachers. Students are not the only readers to practice reattribution. Scientific discoveries have on occasion forced historians of literature - and even more, of art - to ascribe works to creators other than those to whom they were at first incorrectly attributed...
article.png
Interview de Percival Everett - Assises Internationales du Roman 2011 par Percival Everett, Clifford Armion, publié le 30/08/2011
In May 2011, Percival Everett took part in the fifth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. He was kind enough to grant us an interview at the Hotel Carlton in Lyon.
type-video.png texte.png entretien.png
Becoming No One par Gwenaëlle Aubry, publié le 15/01/2013
"The writing project came as the answer to a question that can, in retrospect, be formulated as follows: How can we grieve for a melancholy person, a person who was grieving himself? How can we get to grips with the absence of someone who was never really present?"
article.png
For another Hysterature par Emilie Notéris, publié le 17/12/2012
Since the question of women’s freedom in writing, or “Why stories of transgression or women’s assertions of freedom are less tolerated than those of men?” only highlight ordinary male chauvinism (the answer to the question is undeniably related to cultural issues), I prefer to focus on the counter strategies that can be deployed in response to the insults made to women, like the one Eileen Myles describes in her introduction to I love Dick by Chris Kraus, What about Chris?: “She’s turned female abjection inside out and aimed it at a man.” In other words, rather than identifying the reasons for the violent reception of women’s transgressive writing, I prefer to think about the strategies that can flow from them.
article.png
Kirsty Gunn: Sound and Writing par Kirsty Gunn, publié le 08/09/2014
That sound you hear, as though coming off the lonely Scottish hills, through the fine Highland air, passing across straths and glens, along rivers and to the sea... Is the sound of the piobaireachd, the classical music of the great Highland bagpipe, a music made for Gatherings, Salutes and Laments, a grand and grave and complicated music - Ceol Mor it is in Gaelic - The Big Music. The Big Music, too, is the title of my latest work of fiction - not a novel, but an elegy, as Virginia Woolf described all her work - a story that sounds as much as it says... An experience of words, of a story of people and a landscape, of a love story played across generations, that nevertheless sounds in the mind...
article.png
Rencontre avec Ian McEwan autour de son roman Atonement par Ian McEwan, Vanessa Guignery, publié le 29/06/2018
Dans le cadre des Assises Internationales du Roman, Ian McEwan est venu à l'École Normale Supérieure de Lyon pour parler de son roman Atonement. Cette rencontre avec les étudiant.e.s a été organisée par Vanessa Guignery, professeur de littérature anglaise et postcoloniale à l'ENS, membre du laboratoire IHRIM, en collaboration avec la Villa Gillet.
type-video.png entretien.png
Are You Going to Write That in Your Book? par Siddhartha Deb, publié le 03/12/2013
Born in north-eastern India in 1970, Siddhartha Deb is the recipient of grants from the Society of Authors in the UK and has been a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Studies at Harvard University. His latest book, a work of narrative nonfiction, ((The Beautiful and the Damned)), was a finalist for the Orwell Prize in the UK and the winner of the PEN Open award in the United States. His journalism, essays, and reviews have appeared in Harpers, The Guardian, The Observer, The New York Times, Bookforum, The Daily Telegraph, The Nation, n+1, and The Times Literary Supplement.
article.png
David Vann: Secret and subtext par David Vann, publié le 07/10/2013
All of the conventions of literary fiction can be successfully broken except one: there must be subtext, a second story beneath the surface. We don’t have to care about a protagonist or even really have a protagonist. We’re not limited to any particular style or structure. But our entire idea of literature being “about” something is based on a second narrative, something else that the surface narrative can point to. What’s interesting to me about this is that we live in a time when surface narratives are taking over. Blogs are generally so worthless for this one reason, that they lack subtext. The online world is, above all, earnest, saying exactly what it means.
article.png
Goldie Goldbloom: Portraits and Faces - Appearance and Disfigurement par Goldie Goldbloom, publié le 27/09/2013
Chekhov is well known for his impartial observations of his characters and for his grasp of “realism”. When I first read his description of the lady with the little dog, I discovered that she is “a fair-haired young lady of medium height, wearing a beret.” I was puzzled. This less than enthusiastic description of the woman Gurov will come to love leaves out many basic details such as the colour of Anna Sergeyevna’s eyes and whether she has an attractive figure. I wondered why Chekhov departs from the wordier earlier traditions of written portraiture, and how his simple sketch of Anna illustrated the “realism” for which he is known.
article.png
Rebelling as a female in the 18th and 19th century literature. From Pamela to Jane Eyre: a path to equality? par Marion Lopez-Burette, publié le 23/09/2013
This article intends to study and compare the way Pamela, Richardson's early heroine of the novel genre, and Charlotte Brontë's romantic Jane, rebel. What follows will underscore the path trodden by female fictional characters in terms of shaping the individual, from the Enlightenment period to the romantic era. The patterns of entrapment and self-willed seclusion the protagonists are involved in function as incentives for rebellion. The ideals they rebel for play the role of living forces in a way that is meaningful to comprehend how the essence of rebellion evolved with time. No matter how much the protagonists' respective procedure may differ, from moral conservatism to personal answering of moral questions through rites of passage, the two female heroines are equally conscious of their value as human beings. Their handling of their hardships and their allegiance to God, however, points to the qualitative and quantitative evolution of the notion of equality.
article.png
Kate O'Riordan: Visions of Ireland - A writer's view par Kate O'Riordan, publié le 17/09/2013
A Londoner by adoption, Kate O’Riordan grew up in the small city of Bantry on the west coast of Ireland. With Le Garçon dans la lune, published in 2008 and Pierres de mémoire, in 2009, O’Riordan signed two new remarkable opuses in which she questions family relationships. A novelist and short-story writer, Kate O’Riordan also writes for the cinema and continues to confirm her legitimate place among Irish authors who count. She came to the Villa Gillet to take part in a discussion on 'Ireland by Irish writers'.
article.png
The Essential David Shrigley par Johanna Felter, publié le 21/05/2013
"David Shrigley is a multidisciplinary artist who started his career in the early nineties self-publishing art books containing cartoon-like drawings for which he is mainly famous. Their trademarks, which are also recognizable in his varied artistic productions – clumsy execution, sloppy handwriting, disturbing or puzzling text, dark humour and uncanny atmosphere – helped Shrigley to gradually shape a clearly distinctive personality in his work which brought him out as one of the current key figures of British contemporary art scene."
article.png type-image.png
How Healing Are Books? par Pierre Zaoui, publié le 22/01/2013
The idea that novels, theater, or poetry often help us live, that they help us feel cleansed or feel stronger, more energized, more alive, or that they at least help us survive by giving us the boost we need to hang on a little longer, is not simply a constant topos of literature, be it western, eastern, or universal. It is an indisputable truth for those who make use of it, whether they write it, read it, comment on it, or transform it into a first-aid kid of maxim-prescriptions and citation-medicines to use as needed.
article.png
Some Thoughts on Identity par Claude Arnaud, publié le 18/01/2013
It is the topic par excellence, the enigma that is impossible to solve. This puppet that we call somewhat pompously “The Self,” what is it in the end? An actor who resigns himself, around the age of thirty, to play only one role, or a born clown who struggles to understand himself, having changed so often?
article.png
Some Thoughts About Memory, Identity, and the False Family Narrative par Mira Bartók, publié le 15/01/2013
Identity and family legacy are partially formed by the family “memory narrative”—a family member, usually our mother or father, tells us stories about what happened before we were born or when we were too young to remember momentous events. But what happens when that narrator in the family is mentally ill, or a compulsive liar? In my case, my schizophrenic mother was the unreliable narrator of our family history. And my alcoholic father, a gifted writer who left when I was four, told my mother’s family grandiose lies about his own past.
article.png
Not Looking for Love par Chris Kraus, publié le 17/12/2012
As women, we are often identified through our choice of sexual partners. When an “attractive” woman has sex with an ugly man, it is a descent into “abjection.” But why? Clearly, it is because as women, we are still believed to attain most of our identities through sexuality. In the present assimilationist climate, any non-monogamous, non-relational sexual act is read as a symptom of emotional damage. Our culture persists in believing that sex holds the magic key to a person’s identity — which is, of course, wrong — and in behaving as if female writers are uniquely charged with upholding the sacred intimacy of the sexual act.
article.png
Declaration of Disinclinations par Lynne Tillman, publié le 11/12/2012
I like the theoretical ideal of neutrality, of non-hierarchical thinking. I’d like to be a writer, a person, but I am not. None of this naming is my choice. I’m a woman, “still” or I’m “only a woman.” “A good, bad woman, a silly, frivolous woman, an intelligent woman, a sweet woman, a harridan, bitch, whore, a fishmonger, gossipy woman. A woman writer.” What is “a woman writer”? Does “woman” cancel or negate “writer”? Create a different form of writer? Or does “woman” as an adjective utterly change the noun “writer”? “Man writer”? Not used. “Male writer,” rarely employed. Are there “man books” being read in “man caves?” OK, I declare: I’m a woman who writes, a person who writes. But how am I read?
article.png
The Words of the Flesh par Wendy Delorme, publié le 11/12/2012
There are people who write from the place that they have been assigned. Some of them with rage so as to get away from it; others, by contrast, who follow the path that has been mapped out for us. There are those who would rather stay on the margin of that space, away from the feminine, off-centered, but are then dragged back to it, kicking and screaming. Their words are women's words, words that are situated. The masculine remains the universal reference. Feminine words stay in the realm of the singular, indexed to the gender of who said them.
article.png
Some thoughts on silence and the contemporary “investigative memoir” par Marco Roth, publié le 06/12/2012
Critics and readers, at least in the United States, seem to be slower to recognize the investigative memoir as a narrative mode deserving of attention as such. The American memoir comes burdened with a history of survivor’s tales and evangelical Protestant redemption stories: the writer is usually delivered from bondage: slavery or captivity in the 19th century, Communism, Nazi Europe, or “substance abuse” in the 20th, and into freedom or the light of truth. THE END. Testifying, in both legal and religious senses, is important. Important too is the sense that the author can be written into a social order, given a normal or productive life...
article.png
The "mechanics of reality": Paul Auster speaks about his work and inspiration par Paul Auster, Jocelyn Dupont, publié le 15/01/2009
A l'occasion du passage de Paul Auster à Lyon, la Villa Gillet a organisé une rencontre entre l'auteur des Brooklyn Follies et plusieurs centaines de lycéens étudiant cette oeuvre pour leur bac d'anglais. La première partie de l'entretien a été menée par Jocelyn Dupont, puis, dans la seconde partie, les lycéens ont pu poser eux-mêmes leurs questions à Paul Auster.
son.png texte.png
Caste and the Present: Modernity, Modernism and Dalit Writing in India par Udaya Kumar, publié le 27/04/2018
Udaya Kumar (Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi) était Professeur invité à l’ENS de Lyon du 12 au 30 octobre 2017 et a donné trois conférences en anglais sur la littérature Dalit du Sud de l’Inde. La première de ces conférences explore la représentation du système de castes dans la littérature Dalit.
type-video.png conference.png
Katherine Mansfield’s Short Stories: An Introduction par Emilie Walezak , publié le 28/06/2011
Katherine Mansfield wrote short stories exclusively and produced a large body of work though she died quite young from tuberculosis when she was 30. She is one the best representatives of modernist short story writing. Virginia Woolf herself admitted to Mansfield that she was jealous of her writing: "and then Morgan Foster said the Prelude and The Voyage Out were the best novels of their time, and I said damn Katherine! Why can't I be the only woman who knows how to write?"
article.png
Precarious Borders: The Nation-State and Arab Diaspora Literature par Jumana Bayeh, publié le 30/01/2020
In this talk, Jumana Bayeh (Macquarie University, Sydney), author of The Literature of the Lebanese Diaspora: Representations of Place and Transnational Identity (2014) outlines her latest project which proposes to trace the representation of borders and the nation-state across a century of Arab writing in English.
type-video.png conference.png
"Ideas don't exist, except within emotions": Interview with Joshua Cohen par Joshua Cohen, Benjamin Ferguson, publié le 20/12/2019
Joshua Cohen is an American writer and literary critic, whose first collection of essays, ATTENTION: Dispatches from a Land of Distraction (2019) explores the notion of attention in today's society. In this interview, Joshua Cohen talks about writing for a global readership, being a novelist in the age of non-fiction, the effects of #MeToo on literary production and the invention of facts.
son.png texte.png entretien.png
Minorities and democracy par Siddhartha Deb, publié le 17/01/2014
In 1916, the Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore delivered a series of lectures that would eventually be collected into the book, Nationalism. Tagore was writing in the glow of his own celebrity (he had just won the Nobel Prize for literature) and from within the heart of the crisis engulfing the modern world, two years into the slow, grim war that had converted Europe into a labyrinth of trenches covered over with clouds of poison gas. For Tagore, this was the tragic but inevitable outcome of a social calculus that valued efficiency, profit and, especially, the spirit of us versus them that bonded together the inhabitants of one nation and allowed them to go out, conquer and enslave other people, most of them members of no nation at all.
article.png
A reading of The Brooklyn Follies through the lens of autofiction par Marie Thévenon, publié le 02/10/2009
From his very first novel, The Invention of Solitude, to his very last, Man in the Dark, Paul Auster has always played with the mixture between autobiography and fiction. The Brooklyn Follies pertains to this tradition and it is through the lens of autofiction that this article proposes to explore this novel. The author starts by observing the similarities between Paul Auster and his characters and pays close attention to the intertextual dimension. She then analyses the metafictional aspects of the narration. Finally, she places this novel among Paul Auster's other works and wonders if there has been an evolution in his writing.
article.png
Cinematic (Manu Joseph) par Manu Joseph, publié le 29/06/2015
As a lonely young man largely forgotten by the world and invisible to the most gorgeous women whom you adore, should you not be writing melancholy poetry or the vain prose of deep self-regard. Instead you are drawn to cinema, you derive so much from movies, and it appears that you have been infected by the unsung altruism of commercial cinema, its duty to entertain. Is it because you think you know how to entertain? Is that your conceit? Or is it humility that pushes you to entertain? Is it not true that you find the need to have a deal with your audience – ‘I have something to say and I am afraid you may not be interested, but I seek the right to say it by giving you something in return’. Isn’t that the humility of cinema?
article.png
Translation as Muse: Muse as Teacher par Mary Jo Bang, publié le 15/11/2013
how can reading not add to one’s experience, and in turn influence a person’s writing? And wouldn’t translation especially affect the brain, since translation involves the closest sort of reading, one where the mind simultaneously reads for meaning and tries to access the equivalent word or expression in another language. Wouldn’t reading the word “pelle” in Italian similarly send a message to the brain to access the synaptic record of all past sensory experience having to do with leather: black jacket, kid gloves, car seat, red belt with an alligator buckle, toy-gun holster, shoe shop. Wouldn’t the experiential knowledge of how those various leathers felt be carried along as the translator toggled between two different linguistic systems? And of course each of those leather memories would be connected to other associational memories, some quite rich in subjectivity.
article.png
"Language is a movement between scattered forms": Interview with Amitava Kumar par Amitava Kumar, Natacha Lasorak, publié le 25/10/2019
Amitava Kumar is an Indian writer and journalist who teaches literature at Vassar College. In this interview, he talks about his collection of essays Away: The Indian Writer as an Expatriate (2004) and his novel Immigrant, Montana (2017), and focuses on the notion of "home", immigration, the caste system and the political situation in India.
type-video.png texte.png entretien.png
Reconfigurations of space in Partition novels par Sandrine Soukaï, publié le 19/09/2019
This article examines two Indian novels Clear Light of Day (1980) by Anita Desai and The Shadow Lines (1988) by Amitav Ghosh along with Burnt Shadows (2009) by Anglo-Pakistani novelist Kamila Shamsie, books written about the Partition of India that accompanied independence in 1947. Partition led to violence on an enormous scale; the exact number of people who were killed has never been ascertained, and estimates vary between one and two million. Partition also caused massive displacements of population, estimated between 12 and 18 million. This paper examines the way in which space – national, familial and communal – was divided and then reshaped by and through Partition. After discussing the fractures, ruptures and uprooting brought about by this trauma, I will consider the way in which diasporic writers devise fictional maps of memory of the past that foster exchanges across geographical borders.
article.png
All men are created equal? Barack Obama and the American Revolution par Steven Sarson, publié le 28/03/2019
Barack Obama believes that the American nation's founding documents—the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution (including the Bill of Rights)—have been the driving forces of American history and remain the foundations of American politics today. In this talk we will explore Obama's analyses of these documents and of their legacies since, in particular in relation to slavery, the Civil War, Jim Crow, and Civil Rights. We will look at the words of Barack Obama, as derived from his writings and speeches, and also at historical sources from the time of the American Revolution, through the Civil War, and to the Civil Rights era.
article.png
Clue (Kate Summerscale) par Kate Summerscale, publié le 09/10/2017
Chaque année les invités anglophones des Assises Internationales du Roman rédigent la définition d'un mot de leur choix. Les traductions françaises de ces textes ainsi que les mots-clés des auteurs de langue française des sept premières saisons des AIRs sont éditées par Christian Bourgois dans un volume intitulé le Lexique Nomade. Nous vous invitons ici à découvrir le texte Clue, de Kate Summerscale.
article.png
L'exposition Tagore à Evry par Azarie Aroulandom, publié le 16/09/2014
Azarie Aroulandom est consultant international auprès d’institutions publiques et d’entreprises privées françaises et étrangères : Ministères des Affaires étrangères et de la Coopération, Chambre de Commerce, Organisations internationales (UNESCO, BIRD, FAO, BIT, CNUCED, ONG….). Il enseigne le Management-et la négociation interculturelle, le Transfert de Technologie, la culture et civilisation indienne et africaine à l’Université d’Evry.
type-video.png conference.png
Charulata (la femme solitaire) : Tagore / Ray par Giovanni Robbiano, publié le 16/09/2014
Charulata (1964) est également connu sous son titre anglais : The Lonely Wife (La femme solitaire). Ce film est une adaptation du roman Nastanirh (Le nid brisé) de Rabindranath Tagore, publié en 1901. Les acteurs principaux sont Madhabi Mukherjee, Sailen Mukjerjee et Soumitra Chatterjee dans les rôles principaux de Chârulatâ, son mari Bhupati et son cousin Amal. Comme la plupart des films de Ray, ce film est en noir et blanc et dure 117 minutes. Il en a également composé la musique. Il a été produit par R. D. Banshai, et le directeur de la photo était Subrata Mitra. Celui-ci a fait la photo de la plupart des films de Ray et en particulier de ses premiers chefs-d'œuvre : la Trilogie d'Apu : Pather Panchali (La complainte du sentier, 1955), Apu Sansar (Le monde d’Apu, 1959) et Aparajito (L’Invaincu, 1956).
type-video.png conference.png
Qui est Tagore ? par Azarie Aroulandom, publié le 16/09/2014
Au vingtième siècle, la culture fut dominée par un immense génie Rabindranath Tagore, l’un des plus grands philosophes et poètes de l’histoire du monde. On a dit de Rabindranath Tagore (7 mai 1861-7 août 1941) qu’il fut le Léonard de Vinci de la Renaissance bengali. Tagore naît le 7 mai 1861 au Bengale, à Calcutta, la plus importante ville de l’Inde à cette époque. Il est le quatorzième enfant d’une famille aisée, il grandit dans l’ombre d’un père savant et réformateur religieux. Dans une vision prophétique, son père lui donna le prénom « Robindra » qui signifie le soleil « car plus tard comme lui, il ira par le monde et le monde sera éclairé ».
type-video.png conference.png
Satyajit Ray, ambassadeur de Tagore par Brigitte Gauthier, publié le 15/09/2014
Il y a quelque chose de délicat, subtil, dans l’œuvre du cinéaste Satyajit Ray. Il nous prend par la main et nous invite à pénétrer une culture autre en douceur. On est immédiatement happé par son univers même si la langue et la culture sont distantes. Comment parvient-il à se faire l’ambassadeur de l’Inde en pleine mutation ? On suit ses films de l’intérieur. On est invité à placer notre regard au centre du film et non à l’extérieur, sans pour autant à aucun moment nous identifier aux personnages qui sont totalement autres. On se glisse derrière la caméra, et la lenteur des plans nous permet de nous imprégner de la vie qui se déroule. Les villageois passent le long d’un chemin, les personnages entrent et sortent des plans. Partout, qu’il tourne des scènes d’intérieur ou d’extérieur, le flux de la vie anime l’image...
article.png
Lorna Goodison: a short story par Lorna Goodison, publié le 05/09/2014
Dans le cadre de notre partenariat avec la Villa Gillet, nous avons le plaisir de publier cette délicieuse historiette de Lorna Goodison sur les rapports conjugaux…
article.png
Kate Chopin as a Vocal Colourist: Vocalscapes in “Beyond the Bayou” par Manuel Jobert, publié le 16/04/2013
Authors sometimes pepper their writings with features of orality. Charles Dickens, Emily Brontë, Thomas Hardy or George Bernard Shaw have become household names renowned for this propensity to rely on the vocal medium. Orality, however, is an umbrella term that covers a wide range of possible meanings. In this paper, I shall mainly be concerned with direct speech and the way it represents spoken discourse proper.
article.png
Benang reflects on his ancestors par Kim Scott, ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 03/01/2012
A partir d'un extrait du roman "Benang", oeuvre de l'écrivain australien Kim Scott, traitant des projets eugénistes imaginés par certains colons en Australie, cette page propose des exercices de compréhension générale et détaillée, ainsi que de grammaire.
exercice.png texte.png
Sens de quelques petits riens dans le roman d’Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things par Fabienne Labaune, publié le 30/05/2011
Cet article se propose d'analyser le sens des petits riens qui donnent leur titre au roman. Ils seront vus comme un système de signes qui renvoient d'abord à la société et sont au service de la satire. Mais le déchiffrage de ces signes invite à voir le roman comme un palimpseste et les petits riens comme les signes de l'expérience traumatique ou de ses traces, donc comme les signes de l'exercice de la mémoire. Enfin, on montrera que les petits riens valent pour eux-mêmes, dans leur fragilité, et qu'ils renvoient à une conception de l'enfance et plus largement de l'écriture.
article.png
Théâtralisation et kathakali dans The God of Small Things d’Arundhati Roy par Florence Labaune-Demeule, publié le 30/05/2011
Le roman d'A. Roy, The God of Small Things, fait la part belle à la théâtralisation, que cette dernière se manifeste par de courtes références intertextuelles à Shakespeare par exemple, ou par de plus longs renvois au kathakali, genre dramatique typique du sud de l'Inde, qui allie théâtre, danse, chant et musique. La théâtralisation, dans ce roman, prend aussi un sens beaucoup plus général, car on observe que la codification extrême, parfois excessive, de la société anglophile d'Ayemenem conduit chacun à surjouer le rôle qu'il se donne. Cet article s'attachera donc à montrer comment théâtralisation et codification s'expriment au quotidien, avant d'analyser le lien qui s'établit entre théâtralisation, sacralisation et expiation grâce au kathakali. Enfin, on montrera comment l'écriture de Roy peut elle-même être perçue comme une forme de théâtralisation décentrée ou « ex-centrée » cette fois qui conduit le lecteur à une condition quasi extatique par la magie du verbe.
article.png
Breaking Bounds in Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things par Catherine Pesso-Miquel, publié le 13/05/2011
This article on Arundhati Roy's novel focuses more particularly on the idea of dividing lines, turned into parodied, ridiculous devices, and on their transgression. Analysing in particular the love scenes between the two lovers and the incest scene between the two twins, it attempts to define the differences rather than the similarities between such scenes, asking the question: is transgression necessarily linked with progression? The article will show that Roy, like other Indo-Anglian novelists such as Salman Rushdie, goes to war with the sacrosanct notion of purity, celebrating instead mixing, hybridizing, and the blurring of boundaries.
article.png
Le retour dans The God of Small Things d’Arundhati Roy par Elsa Sacksick, publié le 02/05/2011
The God of Small Things, est une œuvre sous le signe du retour. Celui-ci s'inscrit dans le rapport à l'espace, au temps, dans la construction narrative et se révèle affecter la langue elle-même. Nous verrons, après avoir étudié les différentes modalités du retour en tant que réitération, que s'il prend à première vue la forme d'un ressassement, d'une régression ou d'un bégaiement, il apparaît également à l'origine d'un rythme puissant qui scande l'écriture et lui insuffle une qualité éminemment poétique.
article.png
Benang, itinéraire d’une reconstruction identitaire : de la dislocation à la renaissance par Isabelle Bénigno, publié le 08/04/2011
L'écrivain aborigène Kim Scott doit indiscutablement sa notoriété à la publication en 1999 de son second roman, Benang. Harley (métis aborigène) tente de retrouver ses racines, de comprendre pourquoi il est aborigène alors qu'il est blanc de peau. A travers l'examen de documents historiques authentiques (des origines de l'Australie coloniale à la mise en œuvre de la politique d'assimilation) et le récit des vies brisées des grands-parents, oncles et tantes du narrateur, ce dernier explore les violences physiques et psychologiques subies par les Aborigènes. L'éclatement de la diégèse accompagne le narrateur dans la découverte progressive d'une généalogie personnelle pour le moins cruelle. Au terme de cette quête, Harley réalise qu'il est le « résultat » de plusieurs générations de métissage imposé par des autorités australiennes déterminées à « blanchir la race » et dont son grand-père, Ern Solomon Scat est l'un des artisans.
article.png
Introduction à The God of Small Things d'Arundhati Roy par Florence Labaune-Demeule, publié le 21/03/2011
The God of Small Things, roman publié en 1997, permit à son auteur, la romancière indienne Arundhati Roy, de recevoir le Booker Prize la même année. Publié dans de nombreux pays et traduit en plus de quarante langues, ce roman a été applaudi à maintes reprises par la critique, notamment en raison de l'analyse subtile des relations humaines qui y est abordée. Comme le dit A. Roy elle-même, « The book really delves, very deep I think, into human nature. The story tells of the brutality we're capable of, but also that aching, intimate love [shared by twins]. »
article.png
The God of Small Things : Suggestions de lecture par Florence Labaune-Demeule, publié le 21/03/2011
Il ne s'agit nullement d'avoir ici pour ambition de présenter une bibliographie complète des œuvres d'Arundhati Roy ou de la critique concernant The God of Small Things. Nous espérons simplement pouvoir aider le lecteur dans son approche de l'auteur et de l'œuvre par quelques suggestions de lecture... Que les personnes dont les noms n'apparaissent pas ici veuillent bien nous excuser par avance pour cette bibliographie parcellaire.
bibliographie.png
« [Setting] the Terror rolling » (199) : Le déclenchement de la Terreur dans The God of Small Things par Florence Labaune-Demeule, publié le 15/03/2011
Cet article propose un commentaire de la scène capitale où Vellya Paapen, le père de Velutha, dévoile la transgression des amants à Mammachi, la mère d'Ammu. Cette scène de révélation évolue en une scène de confrontation violente, qui permet au lecteur de percevoir le vrai visage des personnages dont la vie est régie par les lois sociales implacables de l'Inde de la fin des années soixante. Mais le tragique de l'extrait est subverti par la caricature et le grotesque, donnant à la narration une ambivalence inattendue.
article.png
The God of Small Things d’Arundhati Roy : lecture du chapitre 21, le dénouement par Fabienne Labaune, publié le 03/02/2011
L'article se propose de s'interroger sur le choix de cet épisode de rencontre amoureuse et sur le sens du dénouement en analysant d'abord l'aspect tragique de la scène puis son lyrisme, pour montrer enfin, en reliant le chapitre 21 au chapitre précédent, qu'Arundhati Roy a ainsi voulu donner à son roman une dimension mythique.
article.png
Beverley Naidoo: A conversation with students par Beverley Naidoo, Lycée Jean-Baptiste de la Salle, Rouen, publié le 03/06/2010
La transcription d'une visioconférence entre Beverley Naidoo et les élèves du Lycée Jean-Baptiste de la Salle (Rouen).
article.png
An interview with Beverley Naidoo par Beverley Naidoo, Clifford Armion, publié le 01/06/2010
Un entretien accordé à La Clé des langues par Beverley Naidoo suite à son déplacement dans l'académie de Rouen.
entretien.png texte.png
Beverley Naidoo, The Other Side of Truth, 2000 par Beverley Naidoo, Lycée Jean-Baptiste de la Salle, Rouen, publié le 17/05/2010
Deux extraits d'une pièce inspirée du roman "The Other Side of Truth" de Beverley Naidoo, adaptée par David Stevens, et jouée au Musée des Beaux-Arts de Rouen par les élèves de Madame Bertholle, professeur d'anglais au Lycée J. B. de la Salle.
type-video.png
Incroyable fiction : L’histoire de Pi de Yann Martel (2001), relecture contemporaine de Noé et Robinson par Anne Besson, publié le 14/12/2009
Le roman de Yann Martel, typique de la post-modernité, dont l'intrigue "surfictionnelle" mêle théologie et zoologie, exploite de façon à la fois massive et désinvolte ses références intertextuelles, et en premier lieu le parallèle avec le Noé biblique, dans un hymne à la fiction et à la foi ne faisant qu'une, à la croyance et au déguisement métaphorique du réel comme enchantement de l'existence.
article.png
Entre raillerie et révérence : A Suitable Boy ou le pastiche renouvelé par Mélanie Heydari, publié le 09/10/2009
Pastiche de la grande tradition littéraire victorienne, A Suitable Boy, de Vikram Seth, se situe de manière éminemment originale dans le renouveau de la production littéraire postcoloniale. Entre raillerie et révérence, désir d’imitation et volonté de changement, ce roman-fleuve révèle l’affiliation de l’auteur aux canons victoriens : cette écriture délibérément lisse, sans aspérités, aux antipodes de celle d’un Rushdie, ne trahit en effet nulle autre appartenance, nulle généalogie.
conference.png type-video.png texte.png
Une réécriture gourmande du roman de langue anglaise : celle du pasticheur par François Gallix, publié le 09/10/2009
Cette communication a deux axes. Quelques considérations théoriques sur la technique du pastiche littéraire comme écriture imitative intertextuelle sont suivies d’ exemples extraits de la littérature de langue anglaise contemporaine (notamment Peter Ackroyd, David Lodge et Mark Crick), soulignant ce qu’A.S. Byatt appelle “greedy rewriting“, cette réécriture gourmande des textes canoniques qui fait littéralement revivre les récits des écrivains du passé proche ou lointain.
conference.png type-video.png texte.png
En attendant les barbares de Coetzee : réécrire la mort du Christ, refuser la Croix par Maxime Decout, publié le 09/10/2009
Ecrivain du XXIe siècle, Coetzee propose dans Waiting for the Barbarians une réécriture de la Passion du Christ qui interroge le rôle de la souffrance individuelle ou collective. L’homme chargé de vivre ce nouveau Calvaire découvre la vanité de la souffrance dans un monde privé de Dieu ainsi que l’impossibilité de toute rédemption. Cette communication tente de dépasser une lecture politique du texte en s’intéressant au fonctionnement de l’intertexte biblique.
conference.png type-video.png texte.png
Qu'est-ce que l'intertextualité ? par Emilie Walezak, Jocelyn Dupont, publié le 18/09/2009
Cette page propose une définition de l'intertextualité et regroupe les communications de la journée d'étude sur l'intertextualité dans le roman contemporain de langue anglaise, organisée le 19 juin 2009 à Lyon 2 par le CARMA.
article.png bibliographie.png
Fundamentalism and Literature par Nilufer Bharucha, Frédéric Regard, Anne Dromart, publié le 17/09/2009
La Clé des Langues vous propose d'écouter une sélection de communications prononcées à l'occasion de cet évènement accueilli par L'Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon les 29 et 30 mai 2008.
conference.png son.png
The “obstinate resistance” of Woolf’s short stories par Christine Reynier, publié le 31/03/2009
I have often wondered why, although I have regularly gone back to Virginia Woolf's short stories, I still feel I do not know them very well. This is of course no other than the secret charm of Woolf's short stories: they are so hermetic or puzzling that one cannot help re-reading them; they are so varied that one keeps forgetting them; they are so challenging that one feels bound to delve into them again and again. They offer the "obstinate resistance" (Woolf 1988: 158) of the text that Woolf loves in Sir Thomas Browne's writings and that she analyses in her essay "Reading". The military metaphor of resistance might suggest that once the fortress of the text has been assaulted, it will surrender to the reader. However, the author makes it clear that such is not the case.
article.png
Across the ‘Wide Sargasso Sea’: Jean Rhys’s Revision of Charlotte Brontë’s Eurocentric Gothic par Sylvie Maurel, publié le 20/03/2008
In this article, Sylvie Maurel analyses the Gothic destabilizing machinery at work in Jean Rhys’s "Wide Sargasso Sea". The first Gothic element the author looks at is the demonic agency that haunts the novel. Colonial history lingers in Rhys’s world and accounts for some of the strange and unexpected phenomena that occur on the island. Actually, the narrative is under the double influence of a past set in an actual history of slavery and a future already written in the story of "Jane Eyre". Rhys’s characters have an uncanny prescience of what lies ahead and a sense that they cannot evade repetition. The motif of witchcraft is another element that links "WSS" to the Gothic. The motif goes beyond a picturesque reference to the West Indian context and functions as a metaphor of the relationship between language and power. Christophine’s witchcraft and Rochester’s Eurocentric discourse are two similar attempts at transforming the world through language. The power of language is also reflected in the way the novel constantly brings together multiple voices and conflicting views which seem to hide a secret rather than reveal a final truth. Rochester can only feel the presence of such a secret and risks delirium as he tries to get a grip on something that constantly eludes him.
article.png
Jean Rhys ou la revenance : Wide Sargasso Sea par Frédéric Regard, publié le 20/09/2007
Cet article est un chapitre extrait de "L'Ecriture féminine en Angleterre", de Frédéric Regard, publié aux Presses Universitaires de France (2002) dans la collection "Perspectives anglo-saxonnes".
article.png
Wide Sargasso Sea de Jean Rhys : "L'ailleurs de l'ailleurs" par Eileen Williams-Wanquet, publié le 19/09/2007
"Wide Sargasso Sea" ne peut se lire qu’en référence – et en comparaison – à "Jane Eyre", sur lequel il oblige à porter un autre regard, un autre point de vue. Mais Rhys, nous dit l’auteur de cet article, ne se contente pas de présenter simplement le revers de "Jane Eyre" et nous montre qu’il existe toujours l’ « ailleurs de l’ailleurs ».
article.png