Vous êtes ici : Accueil / par_theme

Recherche multi-critères

Liste des résultats

Il y a 140 éléments qui correspondent à vos termes de recherche.
Book (R.J. Ellory) par R.J. Ellory, publié le 08/04/2014
Chaque année, les invités des Assises Internationales du Roman rédigent la définition d'un mot de leur choix : il s'agit ici du mot "book", défini par l'auteur anglais R.J. Ellory.
article.png
Are You Going to Write That in Your Book? par Siddhartha Deb, publié le 03/12/2013
Born in north-eastern India in 1970, Siddhartha Deb is the recipient of grants from the Society of Authors in the UK and has been a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Studies at Harvard University. His latest book, a work of narrative nonfiction, ((The Beautiful and the Damned)), was a finalist for the Orwell Prize in the UK and the winner of the PEN Open award in the United States. His journalism, essays, and reviews have appeared in Harpers, The Guardian, The Observer, The New York Times, Bookforum, The Daily Telegraph, The Nation, n+1, and The Times Literary Supplement.
article.png
The spoken word and the written word in Paul Auster’s The Brooklyn Follies par Catherine Pesso-Miquel, publié le 16/10/2009
This article analyses the construction of voices in Paul Auster’s The Brooklyn Follies, in which the paradoxical relationship between printed signs on a page and phonemes uttered by human bodies is fore-grounded. Auster revels in creating lively dialogues that are carefully inscribed within a particular voice through the use of didascalia, but he also celebrates the physicality and euphony of a narrative voice which navigates between elegiac lyricism and sharp-witted humour. The Brooklyn Follies, like all Auster’s books, is a book about books, but this one is also a book about tales and story-telling, about speech and silence, and the very American tradition of tall tales.
article.png
Morality (Adelle Waldman) par Adelle Waldman, publié le 26/08/2015
Two of my favorite authors, Jane Austen and George Eliot, are very concerned with characters’ moral lives. In “The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P.,” I look closely at how Nathaniel P. justifies his behavior to himself. Today, books or films about romantic relationships, or dating, are often seen as very light—mere amusements and escapes—but this is the area in life when most of us will reveal how we treat others: how kind we are to those we don’t (or no longer) love and how we respond when differences arise with those we do love. I wanted to write a book about relationships that was truthful without being escapist, and I wanted to look closely at how dating behavior reflects morality in the deepest sense.
article.png
A.S. Byatt - Assises Internationales du Roman 2010 par A.S. Byatt , Emilie Walezac , publié le 10/06/2010
In May 2010, Antonia Susan Byatt took part in the fourth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She granted us an interview and was kind enough to read a passage form The Children's Book, her latest novel.
entretien.png type-video.png texte.png
Nicholson Baker on his literary career and how he came to write about sex par Nicholson Baker, publié le 13/06/2012
I think the job of the novelist is to write about interesting things, including things that might not seem all that interesting at first glance--like, say, a lunch hour on an ordinary weekday – and to offer evidence that life is worth living. At least, that’s what I try to do – not always successfully. My first book was about a lunch hour – the second about sitting in a rocking chair holding a baby – the third about literary ambition. There was almost no sex in those three books. But I always wanted to be a pornographer – because after all sex is amazing and irrational and embarrassing and endlessly worth thinking about. My fourth book was called Vox, and it was about two strangers telling stories to each other on the phone. I decided to write it as one big sex scene, because if you’re going to do it, do it.
article.png
Fiche de lecture : Book of Longing, Leonard Cohen par Mélanie Roche, publié le 03/05/2008
Cohen's poetry – the title of the book makes no mystery of it – deals essentially with longing: longing for women, for God, or simply truth. What emerges from the whole book is the idea of an irretrievable loss. From the beginning, we learn that in spite of the author's retreat on Mount Baldy, enlightenment has hardly touched him: he has found neither God nor any essential truth.
article.png
Aux origines de Twelve Years a Slave (Steve McQueen, 2013) : le récit d’esclave de Solomon Northup par Michaël Roy, publié le 20/03/2013
Aux origines du film de Steve McQueen, Twelve Years a Slave (2013), il y a le récit de l’esclave américain Solomon Northup (1853). Cet article présente d’abord le récit d’esclave et situe cette forme littéraire dans le paysage idéologique de l’Amérique d’avant la guerre de Sécession ; il détaille ensuite l’histoire éditoriale de Twelve Years a Slave ; il donne enfin quelques repères dans l’œuvre et évoque son devenir critique.
article.png
How Healing Are Books? par Pierre Zaoui, publié le 22/01/2013
The idea that novels, theater, or poetry often help us live, that they help us feel cleansed or feel stronger, more energized, more alive, or that they at least help us survive by giving us the boost we need to hang on a little longer, is not simply a constant topos of literature, be it western, eastern, or universal. It is an indisputable truth for those who make use of it, whether they write it, read it, comment on it, or transform it into a first-aid kid of maxim-prescriptions and citation-medicines to use as needed.
article.png
We’re Going on a Bear Hunt: Traditional and Counter-traditional Aspects of a Classic Children’s Book par Véronique Alexandre, publié le 07/07/2017
The read-aloud book We’re Going on a Bear Hunt, “retold” by Michael Rosen and illustrated by Helen Oxenbury designed for very young children may be unlikely teaching material for EFL students in French middle and senior schools. But if studied in conjunction with the video released by The Guardian in 2014 to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the book, and if additional literary and artistic references are brought into the lesson plan, the teaching project may prove rewarding on many levels.
article.png
The Intensification of Punishment from Thatcher to Blair: From conservative authoritarianism to punitive interventionism par Emma Bell, publié le 12/03/2010
Emma Bell is a Senior Lecturer in British Studies at Savoie University (Chambéry). Her research focuses on contemporary British penal policy. She will be publishing a book on the subject entitled Criminal Justice and Neoliberalism at the end of 2010 with Palgrave Macmillan.
article.png
The Gay Liberation Front and queer rights in the UK: a conversation with Jeffrey Weeks par Jeffrey Weeks, publié le 23/05/2019
Jeffrey Weeks is a gay activist and historian specialising in the history of sexuality. His work includes Socialism and the New Life (1977) and Coming Out: Homosexual Politics in Britain from the Nineteenth Century to the Present (1977). He was invited at the LGBT Centre in Lyon to talk about his latest book What is sexual history (2016), which has been translated in French and published by the Presses Universitaires de Lyon. The discussion was moderated by Quentin Zimmerman.
son.png texte.png conference.png entretien.png
Victorian printing and William Morris’s Kelmscott Press par Laura Mingam, publié le 09/05/2013
During the Victorian period, the Industrial Revolution reached the field of printing, and profoundly altered book production in England. Even though technical innovations led to the creation of dazzling volumes, the artist designer William Morris denounced the corruption of traditional printing methods. As a reaction against the standards of his time, William Morris decided to open his own printing press, with the aim of “producing [books] which would have a definite claim to beauty”. The Kelmscott Press was to become a new landmark in the history of English printing.
article.png type-image.png
Kate Colquhoun on the blurred boundaries between fiction and non-fiction par Kate Colquhoun, publié le 11/09/2012
Truman Capote called his 1966 book In Cold Blood the first non-fiction novel. Since then, the boundaries between fiction and non-fiction have become increasingly blurred. Are these false definitions? At least we could say that novelists are able to articulate the internal worlds – the thoughts and feelings – of their characters while non-fiction relies entirely on evidence.
article.png
Going Solo par Eric Klinenberg, publié le 19/02/2013
About five years ago I started working on a book that I planned to call ALONE IN AMERICA. My original idea was to write a book that would sound an alarm about a disturbing trend: the unprecedented rise of living alone. I was motivated by my belief that the rise of living alone is a profound social change – the greatest change of the past 60 years that we have failed to name or identify. Consider that, until the 1950s, not a single human society in the history of our species sustained large numbers of people living alone for long periods of time. Today, however, living alone is ubiquitous in affluent, open societies. In some nations, one-person households are now more common than nuclear families who share the same roof. Consider America. In 1950, only 22 percent of American adults were single, and only 9 percent of all households had just one occupant. Today, 49 percent of American adults are single, and 28 percent of all households have one, solitary resident.
article.png
Minorities and democracy par Siddhartha Deb, publié le 17/01/2014
In 1916, the Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore delivered a series of lectures that would eventually be collected into the book, Nationalism. Tagore was writing in the glow of his own celebrity (he had just won the Nobel Prize for literature) and from within the heart of the crisis engulfing the modern world, two years into the slow, grim war that had converted Europe into a labyrinth of trenches covered over with clouds of poison gas. For Tagore, this was the tragic but inevitable outcome of a social calculus that valued efficiency, profit and, especially, the spirit of us versus them that bonded together the inhabitants of one nation and allowed them to go out, conquer and enslave other people, most of them members of no nation at all.
article.png
The Politics of Fear par Corey Robin, publié le 19/12/2014
In my 2004 book Fear: The History of a Political Idea, I argued that “one day, the war on terrorism will come to an end. All wars do. And when it does, we will find ourselves still living in fear: not of terrorism or radical Islam, but of the domestic rulers that fear has left behind.” When I wrote “one day,” I was thinking decades, not years. I figured that the war on terror—less the invasions, wars, torture, drone attacks, and assassinations than the broader atmosphere of pervasive and militarized dread, what Hobbes called “a tract of time, wherein the will to contend by battle is sufficiently known” and an enemy is perceived as permanent and irrepressible—would continue at least into the 2010s, if not the '20s. Yet even before Osama bin Laden was killed and negotiations with the Taliban had begun, it was clear that the war on terror, understood in those terms, had come to an end.
article.png
Rachel Cusk: Love narratives par Rachel Cusk, publié le 28/08/2014
If it’s true that we use narrative as a frame to make sense of the randomness of our human experience, then the story of romantic love might be seen as reflecting our profoundest anxieties about who and what we are, about what happens to us and why. The love narrative is ostensibly a story of progress, yet its true goal is to achieve an ending, a place of finality where nothing further needs to happen and the tension between fantasy and reality can cease. At the wedding of man and woman a veil is drawn, an ending arrived at: the reader closes the book, for marriage as it is lived represents the re-assertion of reality over narrative. Having committed this public act of participation and belief in the notion of life as a story, man and woman are left to order and confer meaning on their private experiences as best they can...
article.png
Introduction à The God of Small Things d'Arundhati Roy par Florence Labaune-Demeule, publié le 21/03/2011
The God of Small Things, roman publié en 1997, permit à son auteur, la romancière indienne Arundhati Roy, de recevoir le Booker Prize la même année. Publié dans de nombreux pays et traduit en plus de quarante langues, ce roman a été applaudi à maintes reprises par la critique, notamment en raison de l'analyse subtile des relations humaines qui y est abordée. Comme le dit A. Roy elle-même, « The book really delves, very deep I think, into human nature. The story tells of the brutality we're capable of, but also that aching, intimate love [shared by twins]. »
article.png
Taking History Personnally par Cynthia Carr, publié le 12/12/2013
Two black men were lynched in Marion, Indiana, on the night of August 7, 1930. That was my father’s hometown, the town where I have my roots, and I heard this story when I was a little girl: The night it happened someone called my grandfather, whose shift at the Post Office began at three in the morning. "Don’t walk through the courthouse square tonight on your way to work," the caller said. "You might see something you don’t want to see." Apparently that was the punchline, which puzzled me. Something you don’t want to see. Then laughter. I was in my late twenties — my grandfather long dead — when I first came upon the photo of this lynching in a book. It has become an iconic image of racial injustice in America: two black men in bloody tattered clothing hang from a tree and below them stand the grinning, gloating, proud and pleased white folks.
article.png
Reconfigurations of space in Partition novels par Sandrine Soukaï, publié le 19/09/2019
This article examines two Indian novels Clear Light of Day (1980) by Anita Desai and The Shadow Lines (1988) by Amitav Ghosh along with Burnt Shadows (2009) by Anglo-Pakistani novelist Kamila Shamsie, books written about the Partition of India that accompanied independence in 1947. Partition led to violence on an enormous scale; the exact number of people who were killed has never been ascertained, and estimates vary between one and two million. Partition also caused massive displacements of population, estimated between 12 and 18 million. This paper examines the way in which space – national, familial and communal – was divided and then reshaped by and through Partition. After discussing the fractures, ruptures and uprooting brought about by this trauma, I will consider the way in which diasporic writers devise fictional maps of memory of the past that foster exchanges across geographical borders.
article.png
Meritocracy (David Samuels) par David Samuels, publié le 11/06/2015
“Meritocracy” is the comic honorific that the American elite has awarded to itself in recognition of its accomplishments since the end of the Cold War. The coinage has proved to be a lasting and significant one because it does so many kinds of necessary work at once. “Meritocracy” assuages the inherent tension that exists between the terms “elite” and “popular democracy” by suggesting that the new American elite has earned its position in an entirely democratic way. Yes, we do have an elite, the word admits, as other nations do: but our elite merely consists of the most “meritorious” members of our democracy, and so any potentially troubling contradiction dissolves in a pleasurable way that both the early Puritans and their plutocratic descendents might easily recognize. The fortunes of the founders of Google and Facebook provide us with reassuring proof that the more we have, the more deserving we are.
article.png
The Great Mouse Plot (Roald Dahl) par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 25/11/2014
In Boy: Tales of Childhood, Roald Dahl tells us about his youth, focusing on some of his most remarkable childhood memories. A lot of irony is introduced by the first person narrator who describes these scenes with the hindsight of age.
exercice.png texte.png
Gulliver's Travels (Jonathan Swift) par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 21/11/2014
Travel books were very fashionable in the eighteenth century. Real travelers sometimes included elements of fiction in their accounts of their wanderings to make them sound more exotic and interesting. In Gulliver's Travels, Jonathan Swift makes fun of this literary genre by introducing a fictitious traveler, Gulliver, who tells us about his encounters with strange creatures and countries. Gulliver's first person narrative is introduced by a fake publisher's note which is also written in the first person...
type-image.png exercice.png texte.png
Writing on the self par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 14/11/2014
Critics and academics tend to draw a line between autobiography and fiction. However, it is sometimes difficult to make such a clear distinction between what is made up and what is not. Here are some short texts written by authors who reflect on their use of the first person.
exercice.png texte.png
Self-portraits par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 13/11/2014
A self-portrait is a drawn, engraved, painted, photographed or sculpted representation of an artist by himself. Self-portraits have been a common art form since the Renaissance, a period when artists had a prominent part in society and when a distinct interest in the individual as a subject arose.
type-image.png exercice.png texte.png
First person narratives par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 10/11/2014
Ce dossier sur le thème des auteurs écrivant à la première personne regroupe trois ressources accompagnées d'exercices de compréhension et de production orales et écrites, ainsi que d'analyse d'image.
dossier.png exercice.png
Notebooks (Toby Litt) par Toby Litt, publié le 03/07/2014
Chaque année, les invités des Assises Internationales du Roman rédigent la définition d'un mot de leur choix : il s'agit ici du mot "notebooks", défini par l'auteur anglais Toby Litt.
article.png
Angela Davis: becoming an icon par Clifford Armion, publié le 24/03/2014
Séquence pédagogique en trois parties, autour de la militante américaine des droits de l'homme Angela Davis : 1. Angela Davis posters (Free Angela posters; Shepard Fairey artworks) / 2. Free Angela and All Political Prisoners (Free Angela trailer; Phonetics, the nuclear stress) / 3. Negotiating the Transformations of History (Extract from Angela Davis's The Meaning of Freedom; Grammar, the genitive)
dossier.png exercice.png
Free Angela and All Political Prisoners par Clifford Armion, publié le 28/02/2014
Free Angela and All Political Prisoners is a documentary that chronicles the events surrounding the trial of Angela Davis in 1971. It was directed by Shola Lynch and released in 2012 (US).
type-video.png texte.png exercice.png
Angela Davis posters par Clifford Armion, publié le 07/02/2014
On October 13, 1970, Angela Davis was arrested in New York City by FBI agents. She soon became a global icon suggesting freedom, resilience, and the struggle for equality. Her image was used to illustrate many causes that sometimes had little to do with racial discrimination or the American Civil Rights movement.
type-image.png exercice.png
Negotiating the Transformations of History par Clifford Armion, publié le 27/01/2014
This is an extract from Angela Davis's The Meaning of Freedom, a collection of speeches and papers dealing with the author's life-long struggle against oppression, inequality and prejudice.
texte.png exercice.png
Women on the Home Front in World War One par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 08/11/2013
Cette page aborde sous plusieurs angles la question de l'évolution du statut et du rôle des femmes dans la société anglaise durant et après la Première Guerre Mondiale. Une tâche est ensuite proposée aux apprenants à partir des informations présentées.
type-image.png texte.png exercice.png
A world war par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 08/11/2013
Cette page aborde l'engagement des territoires de l'Empire britannique, notamment le Canada et l'Inde, dans la Première Guerre Mondiale. Une tâche est ensuite proposée aux apprenants à partir des informations présentées.
type-image.png texte.png son.png exercice.png
The Battle of the Somme (1916) par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 30/09/2013
Cette page aborde l'épisode de la bataille de la Somme, vu par des historiens, mais aussi par des témoignages de soldats, par la presse de l'époque et par le ministère de la guerre. Les différents documents présentés font l'objet d'une tâche à réaliser par les apprenants.
type-image.png texte.png exercice.png type-video.png
The sinking of the Lusitania (1915) par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 11/07/2013
Cette page présente brièvement l'épisode tragique du naufrage du paquebot Lusitania en 1915 suite à son torpillage par un sous-marin allemand (ce qui précipita l'entrée en guerre des USA), et propose plusieurs tâches à partir de documents d'époque.
type-image.png texte.png exercice.png type-video.png
Britain and World War One (DNL) par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 05/07/2013
Ce dossier sur l'Empire Britannique pendant Première Guerre Mondiale propose l'étude d'un certain nombre de ressources (affiches de propagande, photographies, textes...) organisées sous forme de séquence pédagogique, et accompagnées de tâches à réaliser par les apprenants.
dossier.png exercice.png
Propaganda posters par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 05/07/2013
Au cours de la Première Guerre Mondiale, les affiches de propagande ont été utilisées pour transmettre efficacement des messages aux populations d'Angleterre et de l'Empire. Ces affichent décrivent la violence de la guerre, sa nature mondiale, le besoin de recrues et de fonds pour soutenir l'effort de guerre. Sur cette page, l'une de ces affiches est analysée, puis une dizaine d'autres affiches sont présentées. Une tâche liant analyse d'image et production orale est proposée à partir de ces documents.
type-image.png texte.png exercice.png
King Lear (Charles Lamb) par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 03/07/2013
Cette page retranscrit la version du Roi Lear issue de l'ouvrage "Tales from Shakespeare". Ce recueil, écrit par Charles et Mary Lamb en 1807 est un livre pour enfants très connu en Angleterre. Chaque histoire suit fidèlement la pièce originale, citant parfois précisément le texte de Shakespeare. Les histoires sont cependant plus courtes que les pièces, car elles adoptent une narration en prose, et que les intrigues secondaires sont parfois raccourcies. Le niveau de langue est évidemment également simplifié.
monographie.png
Macbeth (Charles Lamb) par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 03/07/2013
Cette page retranscrit la version de Macbeth issue de l'ouvrage "Tales from Shakespeare". Ce recueil, écrit par Charles et Mary Lamb en 1807 est un livre pour enfants très connu en Angleterre. Chaque histoire suit fidèlement la pièce originale, citant parfois précisément le texte de Shakespeare. Les histoires sont cependant plus courtes que les pièces, car elles adoptent une narration en prose, et que les intrigues secondaires sont parfois raccourcies. Le niveau de langue est évidemment également simplifié.
monographie.png
Hamlet (Charles Lamb) par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 03/07/2013
Cette page retranscrit la version de Hamlet issue de l'ouvrage "Tales from Shakespeare". Ce recueil, écrit par Charles et Mary Lamb en 1807 est un livre pour enfants très connu en Angleterre. Chaque histoire suit fidèlement la pièce originale, citant parfois précisément le texte de Shakespeare. Les histoires sont cependant plus courtes que les pièces, car elles adoptent une narration en prose, et que les intrigues secondaires sont parfois raccourcies. Le niveau de langue est évidemment également simplifié.
monographie.png
Feigned and real madness in King Lear par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 03/07/2013
Cette page propose plusieurs extraits du "Roi Lear" de Shakespeare, ainsi qu'une reproduction d'un tableau de William Dyce représentant le personnage du Roi Lear. Ces documents sont accompagnés d'exercices de compréhension et d'analyse d'image...
exercice.png
Ophelia's lyrical madness in Hamlet par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 02/07/2013
Cette page propose deux extraits de "Hamlet" de Shakespeare, ainsi qu'une reproduction d'un tableau de John Everett Millais représentant le personnage d'Ophelia. Ces documents sont accompagnés d'exercices de compréhension et d'analyse d'image...
exercice.png
Madness in Shakespeare par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 02/07/2013
La folie est un thème récurrent dans l'oeuvre de Shakespeare. Ce dossier propose une sélection de textes et de peintures en relation avec ses tragédies les plus célèbres (Hamlet, Macbeth et le Roi Lear), accompagnée d'exercices de compréhension et/ou d'analyse d'image (ce dossier fait partie du programme de Littérature étrangère en langue étrangère - LELE).
dossier.png exercice.png
Macbeth - Conveying madness through language par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 02/07/2013
Cette page propose plusieurs extraits de "Macbeth" de Shakespeare, ainsi qu'une reproduction d'un tableau d'Henry Fuseli représentant le personnage de Lady Macbeth. Ces documents sont accompagnés d'exercices de compréhension et d'analyse d'image...
exercice.png
The Essential David Shrigley par Johanna Felter, publié le 21/05/2013
"David Shrigley is a multidisciplinary artist who started his career in the early nineties self-publishing art books containing cartoon-like drawings for which he is mainly famous. Their trademarks, which are also recognizable in his varied artistic productions – clumsy execution, sloppy handwriting, disturbing or puzzling text, dark humour and uncanny atmosphere – helped Shrigley to gradually shape a clearly distinctive personality in his work which brought him out as one of the current key figures of British contemporary art scene."
article.png type-image.png
A global open-circuit television system going live? par Jeffrey Rosen, publié le 11/03/2013
I was at a conference at Google not long ago, and the head of public policy, said he expected that before long, Google and Facebook will be asked to post online live feeds to all the public and private surveillance cameras in the world, including mobile cameras mounted on drones. Imagine that Facebook responds to public pressure and decides to post live feeds, so they can be searched online, as well as archiving the video in the digital cloud.
article.png
Reclaiming space in New York City par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 11/02/2013
Ce dossier sur les questions d'urbanisme et d'aménagement à New York regroupe trois ressources accompagnées d'exercices de compréhension et de production orales et écrites, ainsi que d'analyse d'image.
dossier.png exercice.png
Time Square - Before and After par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 18/01/2013
A partir d'un montage de deux photographies de Time Square, cette page propose des exercices de compréhension générale et d'analyse d'image.
exercice.png type-image.png
The 9/11 memorial, an ambitious renunciation par Clifford Chanin, ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 15/01/2013
A partir d'une interview de Clifford Chanin, directeur de l'éducation et des programmes au 9/11 museum de New York, sur le mémorial du 11 septembre 2001, cette page propose des exercices de compréhension générale et détaillée, ainsi qu'un exercice de phonétique.
exercice.png type-video.png son.png
Paul Auster, The Brooklyn Follies par Paul Auster, publié le 15/01/2013
A partir d'un extrait du roman "The Brooklyn Follies" de Paul Auster, cette page propose des exercices de compréhension générale et détaillée, ainsi qu'un exercice de grammaire.
article.png exercice.png
The black community in New York, past and present par Alondra Nelson, Clifford Armion, publié le 15/01/2013
Alondra Nelson tells us about the history of the black community in New York; where they came from, where they settled and why. She also explores issues related to the urban development in Manhattan and to the gentrification of Harlem.
entretien.png type-video.png telechargement.png
Reclaiming the streets, public space and quality of life in New York par Janette Sadik-Khan, Clifford Armion, publié le 11/01/2013
Mayor Bloomberg’s PlaNYC initiative was a thirty year plan to say ‘what do we need to do to ensure that a 9.4 million New York City works better than an 8.4 million New York City works today?’ so that when you open the door in the year 2030 you like what you see. That long term planning view, understanding the growth that’s going to happen, meant that we needed to change some fundamental things. One of the first things we needed to do was to look at our transport systems differently and use the lever of growth to modernise those transport systems.
entretien.png type-video.png texte.png
Understanding the social media: an interview with Jeffrey Rosen par Jeffrey Rosen, Clifford Armion, publié le 10/01/2013
Now that we’re living most of our lives online, all of us are vulnerable to the internet. The difficulty with young people is that they may not have experienced the dangers of not being able to escape your past until it’s too late. I like to tell the story of Stacy Sneider, the young 22 year old teacher in training who posted a picture of herself on Myspace wearing a pirate’s hat and drinking from a plastic cup that said drunken pirate. Her supervisor at the school said she was promoting drinking and she was fired. She sued and was unable to get her job back and she had to pick an entirely different career. That’s a very dramatic example on how vulnerable all of us are to being judged out of context by a single image or ill chosen picture and once you do that it may be very hard to escape your past.
entretien.png type-video.png texte.png
Declaration of Disinclinations par Lynne Tillman, publié le 11/12/2012
I like the theoretical ideal of neutrality, of non-hierarchical thinking. I’d like to be a writer, a person, but I am not. None of this naming is my choice. I’m a woman, “still” or I’m “only a woman.” “A good, bad woman, a silly, frivolous woman, an intelligent woman, a sweet woman, a harridan, bitch, whore, a fishmonger, gossipy woman. A woman writer.” What is “a woman writer”? Does “woman” cancel or negate “writer”? Create a different form of writer? Or does “woman” as an adjective utterly change the noun “writer”? “Man writer”? Not used. “Male writer,” rarely employed. Are there “man books” being read in “man caves?” OK, I declare: I’m a woman who writes, a person who writes. But how am I read?
article.png
The cultural perception of the American land: a short history par Mireille Chambon-Pernet, publié le 20/11/2012
The importance of land and nature in the American culture is widely known. The Pilgrim Fathers who landed on the coast of the Massachussetts in 1620 were looking for freedom which was both spiritual and material. The latter derived from land ownership, as a landowner called no man master. Yet, in 1893, Jackson Turner announced that: “the American character did not spring full-blown from the Mayflower” “ It came out of the forests and gained new strength each time it touched a frontier”.
article.png type-image.png
Principes fondamentaux de l’intonation par Natalie Mandon, publié le 03/10/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral, consacrée à la chaîne parlée, explicite les principes fondamentaux de l'intonation.
article.png
Phénomènes accentuels et rythmiques par Natalie Mandon, publié le 03/10/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral, consacrée à la chaîne parlée, aborde la question des phénomènes accentuels et rythmiques.
article.png
Biographie/bibliographie de Martin Parr par Bibliohtèque municipale de Lyon, publié le 18/09/2012
Né en Angleterre en 1952, Martin Parr est originaire d’Epsom, dans le Surrey. Son intérêt pour la photographie se manifeste dès l’enfance, sous l’aune de son grand-père George Parr, lui-même photographe amateur accompli. Martin Parr étudie la photographie à l’École polytechnique de Manchester, de 1970 à 1973. Pour subvenir à ses besoins tandis qu’il travaille comme photographe indépendant, il occupe divers postes d’enseignement entre 1975 et l’ouverture des années 1990...
article.png bibliographie.png
Introduction au précis de phonétique et de phonologie par Natalie Mandon, Manuel Jobert, publié le 03/09/2012
La phonologie de l’anglais constitue l’un des trois « savoirs linguistiques » de la langue avec le lexique et la grammaire. Elle concerne trois des cinq compétences : la « compréhension de l’oral », « l’expression orale en continu » et « l’interaction orale ». Malgré les efforts fournis par les auteurs de manuels de langue, il semble que la connaissance des principes de base de la prononciation de l’anglais reste le plus souvent ignorée. La grammaire et la production écrite occupent l’essentiel du temps d’apprentissage. On compte sur l’exposition à l’anglais oral pour régler les problèmes liés à la langue orale. La réalité prouve pourtant que cette simple exposition, si elle est nécessaire, n’est pas suffisante.
article.png
La prononciation de -ed, -s et -th par Manuel Jobert, publié le 10/07/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral, consacrée à l'orthographe et à la prononciation, aborde la question de la prononciation des terminaisons -ed et -s, ainsi que du son th.
article.png
Les digraphes vocaliques accentués par Manuel Jobert, publié le 10/07/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral, consacrée à l'orthographe et à la prononciation, aborde la question des digraphes vocaliques accentués.
article.png
Orthographe et prononciation (Graphématique) par Manuel Jobert, publié le 09/07/2012
Un nombre non négligeable de mots anglais ont une prononciation régulière, c’est-à-dire que l’on peut prévoir avec certitude. Plutôt que d’insister sur les irrégularités, il semble préférable, au Lycée, d’attirer l’attention sur ce qui fonctionne. On peut, ensuite, indiquer quelques prononciations « irrégulières », c’est-à-dire plus difficilement prévisibles.
article.png
Les voyelles monographiques accentuées par Manuel Jobert, publié le 09/07/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral, consacrée à l'orthographe et à la prononciation, aborde la question des voyelles monographiques accentuées.
article.png
Net dangers par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 19/06/2012
Cette page propose un document issu d'une campagne nationale avertissant les parents australiens des dangers cachés de l'Internet. Le document est accompagné de questions de compréhension générale et d'analyse.
exercice.png
Internet: the end of privacy? par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 19/06/2012
Ce dossier propose des ressources qui traitent des "dangers" d'Internet, notamment en matière de protection de la vie privée et de l'identité numérique.
dossier.png exercice.png
Sharing Information: A Day in Your Life par Federal Trade Commission, ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 19/06/2012
Cette page propose, à partir d'une courte animation réalisée par la Federal Trade Commission, des exercices de compréhension générale et détaillée, des questions pour aller plus loin sur le thème de la diffusion des informations personnelles sur Internet, ainsi qu'un point de phonétique.
type-video.png exercice.png telechargement.png
Diphtongues par Natalie Mandon, publié le 18/05/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral décrit les différentes diphtongues de la langue anglaise.
article.png
Monophtongues par Natalie Mandon, publié le 18/05/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral décrit les différentes monophtongues de la langue anglaise.
article.png
Les Sons de l'anglais - Introduction par Natalie Mandon, publié le 18/05/2012
Il est question ici des propriétés phonétiques des voyelles « pures » ou monophtongues, puis de celles des diphtongues. Sont précisés pour chaque son la position de la langue et des lèvres ainsi que le degré d’aperture. Il est important de garder à l’esprit qu’en anglais, d’autres facteurs physiologiques entrent en jeu telles que la tension de la langue et parfois la diphtongaison.
article.png
La composition (1) par Manuel Jobert, publié le 16/05/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral, consacrée à l’accent lexical, aborde les différents types de mots composés : morphologie et sémantisme, accentuation des composés grammaticaux, composition et réduction vocalique.
article.png
Terminaisons contraignantes - Accent sur l’avant-dernière syllabe par Manuel Jobert, publié le 15/05/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral, consacrée à l’accent lexical, aborde la question des terminaisons contraignantes, et cette ressource se concentre spécifiquement sur les cas où l'accent est mis sur l'avant-dernière syllabe.
article.png exercice.png
Terminaisons contraignantes - Règle de -ION et extension par Manuel Jobert, publié le 15/05/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral, consacrée à l’accent lexical, aborde la question des terminaisons contraignantes, et cette ressource se concentre spécifiquement sur le cas des mots finissant en "-ion" et sur les autres terminaisons pour lesquelles la même règle s'applique.
article.png exercice.png
Terminaisons contraignantes - Les terminaisons complexes par Manuel Jobert, publié le 15/05/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral, consacrée à l’accent lexical, aborde la question des terminaisons contraignantes, et cette ressource se concentre spécifiquement sur le cas des terminaisons complexes.
article.png exercice.png
Terminaisons contraignantes - Accent sur l’avant-avant-dernière syllabe par Manuel Jobert, publié le 15/05/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral, consacrée à l’accent lexical, aborde la question des terminaisons contraignantes, et cette ressource se concentre spécifiquement sur les cas où l'accent est mis sur l'avant-avant-dernière syllabe.
article.png exercice.png
Schéma accentuel et nature - Nom /10/ Verbe /01/ par Manuel Jobert, publié le 15/05/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral, consacrée à l’accent lexical, aborde la question des mots pour lesquels l'accentuation se déplace suivant qu'ils fonctionnent comme des noms ou comme des verbes.
article.png
L'accent lexical - Introduction par Manuel Jobert, publié le 11/05/2012
L’accent lexical est l’un des points les plus difficiles de l’anglais oral pour les francophones. Cela est dû au fait que le français ne possède pas d’accent lexical en tant que tel. Il est donc essentiel de prendre conscience très tôt de l’importance de ce phénomène. En anglais, chaque mot lexical possède un accent principal sur une syllabe et les autres syllabes sont inaccentuées.
article.png
Terminaisons contraignantes - Accent sur la dernière syllabe par Manuel Jobert, publié le 11/05/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral, consacrée à l’accent lexical, aborde la question des terminaisons contraignantes, et cette ressource se concentre spécifiquement sur les cas où l'accent est mis sur la dernière syllabe.
article.png exercice.png
Les pronoms personnels et les possessifs (adjectifs et pronoms) par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 10/05/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde les notions de pronom personnel, d'adjectif possessif et de pronom possessif.
article.png
Les Quantifieurs et les Comparatifs (Partie 2) par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 07/05/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde les notions de quantifieurs et de comparatifs (suite).
article.png
Les Quantifieurs et les Comparatifs (Partie 1) par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 07/05/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde les notions de quantifieurs et de comparatifs.
article.png
Les adjectifs par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 04/05/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde la question des adjectifs.
article.png
Les quantifieurs d'adjectifs : comparatifs, superlatifs... par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 04/05/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde la question des quantifieurs d'adjectifs, tels que les comparatifs ou les superlatifs (as...as, more...than, ...).
article.png
Les énoncés complexes : le choix du connecteur (Partie 1) par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 03/05/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde la question des énoncés complexes et des différents connecteurs permettant la réalisation de ces énoncés.
article.png
Les énoncés complexes : le choix du connecteur (Partie 2) par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 03/05/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde la question des énoncés complexes et des différents connecteurs permettant la réalisation de ces énoncés (suite).
article.png
Les Prépositions par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 01/05/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde la question des prépositions.
article.png
This/that - these/those par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 30/04/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde la question des adjectifs démonstratifs this/that et these/those.
article.png
Le génitif et les assemblages en "of" par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 26/04/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde la notion de génitif et la question des assemblages en "of".
article.png
Le trio des articles : Ø, (a)n, the par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 26/04/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde la question des articles Ø, (a)n, the.
article.png
Les noms par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 25/04/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde la notion de nom (définition, types, genres, nombres).
article.png
La composition (2) par Manuel Jobert, publié le 24/04/2012
Cette partie du précis d'anglais oral, consacrée à l’accent lexical, aborde l'accentuation des mots composés, en séparant deux cas : celui pour lequel l'accent est sur le premier élément, et celui pour lequel l'accent est sur le second élément.
article.png
Les différents types d'énoncés par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 23/04/2012
Outre les différents types d'énoncés possibles (affirmatif, négatif, interrogatif, exclamatif), cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde les problèmes soulevés par le passage du style direct au style indirect.
article.png
Les suites V1 V2 et les opérateurs Ø, to et –ing : Comment relier deux verbes qui se suivent dans un énoncé ? (Partie 2) par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 20/04/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aide à répondre à plusieurs questions : quand un verbe en suit un autre dans l’énoncé, sous quelle forme se présente-t-il ? Comment est-il relié au verbe qui le précède ? Suite de la première partie.
article.png
Les adverbes par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 20/04/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde l'utilisation des adverbes.
article.png
Les adverbes (Partie 2) par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 20/04/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde l'utilisation des adverbes (suite).
article.png
Les suites V1 V2 et les opérateurs Ø, to et –ing : Comment relier deux verbes qui se suivent dans un énoncé ? par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 18/04/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aide à répondre à plusieurs questions : quand un verbe en suit un autre dans l’énoncé, sous quelle forme se présente-t-il ? Comment est-il relié au verbe qui le précède ?
article.png
Les verbes dits « causatifs » : get, have, let, make par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 16/04/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde les verbes "causatifs" (get, have, let, make).
article.png
Exprimer l'avenir en anglais par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 05/04/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde les différentes manières d'évoquer l'avenir.
article.png
La voix : active, passive, moyenne, réfléchie, réciproque par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 05/04/2012
Cette partie du précis de grammaire anglaise aborde les voix active, passive, moyenne, réfléchie et réciproque.
article.png
Préface à l'attention des professeurs par Jean-Pierre Gabilan, publié le 05/04/2012
Le précis grammatical qui est présenté ici est à la fois ambitieux et raisonnable, mais sans concession. Il est volontairement « linguistique » en ce sens qu’il repose sur des fondements théoriques dont la pertinence n’est plus à prouver. Les élèves pourront, avec l’aide de leurs professeurs, en appréhender le contenu, à condition toutefois que les têtes de pont, les fondements même de tout édifice grammatical, soient bien installées. Si le professeur doit avant tout rompre lui-même avec une tradition grammaticale dont il sent bien qu’elle ne convient pas mais dont il s’accommode encore pour la salle de classe, rien ne presse. L’adage selon lequel on ne peut expliquer, décrire, que ce qu’on a bien compris soi-même reste de mise. Il n’y a pas urgence à vouloir tout remettre à plat. Mais il faut quand même un jour franchir le pas.
article.png