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Dernières publications

Siddhartha Deb - publié le 17/01/2014

In 1916, the Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore delivered a series of lectures that would eventually be collected into the book, ((Nationalism)). Tagore was writing in the glow of his own celebrity (he had just won the Nobel Prize for literature) and from within the heart of the crisis engulfing the modern world, two years into the slow, grim war that had converted Europe into a labyrinth of trenches covered over with clouds of poison gas.

Randall Kennedy, Kédem Ferré - publié le 10/01/2014

Harvard Law Professor Randall Kennedy answered Aiguerande 11th graders before a conference at the Hôtel de Région for the Villa Gillet Mode d'Emploi festival, on 24 November 2013 in Lyon, France. The meeting was organised by the Villa Gillet and La Clé des Langues, and was prepared by Kédem Ferré and his students.

Clifford Armion, Barbie Zelizer - publié le 06/01/2014

Barbie Zelizer is a Professor of Communication, and holds the Raymond Williams Chair of Communication and is Director of the Scholars Program in Culture and Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. A former journalist, Professor Zelizer's work focuses on the cultural dimensions of journalism, with a specific interest in journalistic authority, collective memory, and journalistic images in times of crisis and war. She also works on the impact of (...)

Peter Szendy - publié le 19/12/2013

"To comfortably acquire, so to speak, as many fingers as needed," said one of Bach’s sons, Carl Philipp Emanuel, in his Essay on the True Art of Playing the Keyboard (1753). And these words are remarkable, as long as we are prepared to take them literally, and not hastily consider them as one of the metaphors that adorn discourse about music and on the bodies that it evokes.

Elena Mannes - publié le 19/12/2013

Our relationship with sound is an intimate one – arguably the most intimate with any of our five senses. We live in a visual society. Many people would say that sight is our primary sense. We hear before we see. In the womb, the fetus begins to develop an auditory system between seventeen and nineteen weeks. Already we are in a world of sound, of breath and heartbeat, of rhythm and vibration. Already, we are feeling the sound with our bodies.

Ian Buruma - publié le 16/12/2013

"When I was at primary school in the Netherlands in the late 1950s and early 1960s, history was still taught as a story of great men, kings, generals, national heroes, and of course great villains, mostly foreigners. In our case, this meant a succession of Williams of Orange, Admiral Tromp, Philip II, the Duke of Alva, Napoleon, Hitler, and so on."

Cynthia Carr - publié le 12/12/2013

Two black men were lynched in Marion, Indiana, on the night of August 7, 1930. That was my father’s hometown, the town where I have my roots, and I heard this story when I was a little girl: The night it happened someone called my grandfather, whose shift at the Post Office began at three in the morning. "Don’t walk through the courthouse square tonight on your way to work," the caller said. "You might see something you don’t want to see." Apparently that was the punchline, which puzzled (...)

Clifford Armion, Doug Saunders - publié le 05/12/2013

Migration almost always follows the same pattern. It doesn’t go from one country to another country. It goes from a cluster of villages or a sub-rural region to specific urban neighbourhoods. Those urban neighbourhoods which are usually low-income, with low housing cost, serve as the bottom rung of the ladder for people arriving in a new country.

Siddhartha Deb - publié le 03/12/2013

One afternoon a few years ago, while on my way back from interviewing some factory workers, I was asked by a very neatly dressed young man if I had read the economist Amartya Sen’s work on famine. He’d first wanted to know if I could get him a job, then if I could help him immigrate to the United States, but when he realized that neither was a possibility, he began a discussion of Sen’s work. Democracies don’t have famines, Sen has written, whereas authoritarian regimes do; hence the (...)

Robyn Creswell - publié le 22/11/2013

Like Jewish and Christian commentators, Muslim exegetes understood the Babel story to be a parable of how mankind’s hubris, in the form of a desire for knowledge or an attempt to reach the heavens, leads to divine punishment. The subsequent confusion of human idioms and scattering of peoples is a second fall from grace, an expulsion from the paradise of monolingualism. Henceforth, translation becomes at once necessary and impossible—impossible in the sense that no translation could ever (...)

Keith Gessen - publié le 19/11/2013

What is the place of the writer in the literary field of the home country? What contribution can this writer make to the literary field of the target or host country? It's important to understand that the answers to these questions will often be different: a writer can be a marginal figure in his home country and become a vital figure in another country. More often, of course, the reverse is true.

Jerry Schatzberg - publié le 15/11/2013

Jerry Schatzberg started his career as a photographer and made his debut as a film director with ((Puzzle of a Downfall Child)) in 1970. Three years later he won the Cannes Film Festival Grand Prix for ((Scarecrow)) with Gene Hackman and Al Pacino. He was invited by the Festival Lumière to present ((Reunion)) (1989) which was screened in Lyon on 18 october 2013.

Esther Allen - publié le 15/11/2013

As our language ceases to dominate cyberspace (our share of the Web has fallen to about 27%), we English speakers are hesitantly stepping out of our monolingual sphere and evincing renewed interest in foreign tongues. Language learning websites like Livemocha and Matador Network seem to crop up like mushrooms, Rosetta Stone is a publicly traded company whose stock is up 41% year to date, and last year’s top-rated YouTube video — remember? —was in Korean (with a few repetitions of “hey (...)

Mary Jo Bang - publié le 15/11/2013

how can reading not add to one’s experience, and in turn influence a person’s writing? And wouldn’t translation especially affect the brain, since translation involves the closest sort of reading, one where the mind simultaneously reads for meaning and tries to access the equivalent word or expression in another language. Wouldn’t reading the word “pelle” in Italian similarly send a message to the brain to access the synaptic record of all past sensory experience having to do with (...)

Estelle Rivier, Isabelle Schwartz-Gastine, Delphine Lemonnier-Texier - publié le 04/11/2013

Mettre en scène une pièce, dit Jean-François Sivadier interrogé sur le processus de création, c’est poser une hypothèse, et la mettre à l’épreuve du plateau, poursuivre le rêve que l’on a sur la pièce, et franchir le pas de son adaptation, accepter d’être confronté à l’écart entre le rêve et le plateau, tout en réussissant à ne pas perdre son rêve. Mettre en scène une pièce de Shakespeare, comme toute autre pièce de répertoire, c’est aussi se confronter à ses (...)

David Vann - publié le 07/10/2013

" Of the twenty or so countries I’ve visited for book launches and interviews, France is the best home for a book, and the United States is one of the worst."

Goldie Goldbloom - publié le 27/09/2013

"Chekhov is well known for his impartial observations of his characters and for his grasp of “realism”. When I first read his description of the lady with the little dog, I discovered that she is “a fair-haired young lady of medium height, wearing a beret.”"

Marion Lopez-Burette - publié le 23/09/2013

This article intends to study and compare the way ((Pamela)), Richardson's early heroine of the novel genre, and Charlotte Brontë's romantic ((Jane)), rebel. What follows will underscore the path trodden by female fictional characters in terms of shaping the individual, from the Enlightenment period to the romantic era. The patterns of entrapment and self-willed seclusion the protagonists are involved in function as incentives for rebellion. The ideals they rebel for play the role of living (...)

Kate O'riordan - publié le 17/09/2013

A Londoner by adoption, Kate O’Riordan grew up in the small city of Bantry on the west coast of Ireland. With ((Le Garçon dans la lune)), published in 2008 and ((Pierres de mémoire)), in 2009, O’Riordan signed two new remarkable opuses in which she questions family relationships. A novelist and short-story writer, Kate O’Riordan also writes for the cinema and continues to confirm her legitimate place among Irish authors who count. She came to the Villa Gillet to take part in a discussion (...)

John Mullen - publié le 27/08/2013

La vie des Britanniques il y a un siècle était souvent très dure. Comme à toute époque, le divertissement, et spécialement la musique, était essentiel pour toutes les classes sociales. Les couches privilégiées organisaient des concerts chez elles, aidées par leurs domestiques, ou allaient dans les salons de danse. La classe ouvrière rejoignait des fanfares ou des chorales, mais surtout allait au music-hall. Dans cet article nous avons choisi 10 chansons à succès des années de (...)

Keith Scribner - publié le 27/08/2013

"In his Nobel Prize acceptance speech William Faulkner famously said that all real meaning in fiction comes from the human heart in conflict with itself. As a novelist I’m compelled by the internal conflicts inherent in the stories we tell ourselves in order to live and how those stories come to define us, how they allow us to justify our actions and possibly delude ourselves about who we are."

publié le 03/07/2013

Cette page retranscrit la version du ((Roi Lear)) issue de l'ouvrage "Tales from Shakespeare". Ce recueil, écrit par Charles et Mary Lamb en 1807 est un livre pour enfants très connu en Angleterre. Chaque histoire suit fidèlement la pièce originale, citant parfois précisément le texte de Shakespeare. Les histoires sont cependant plus courtes que les pièces, car elles adoptent une narration en prose, et que les intrigues secondaires sont parfois raccourcies. Le niveau de langue est (...)

publié le 03/07/2013

Cette page retranscrit la version de ((Macbeth)) issue de l'ouvrage "Tales from Shakespeare". Ce recueil, écrit par Charles et Mary Lamb en 1807 est un livre pour enfants très connu en Angleterre. Chaque histoire suit fidèlement la pièce originale, citant parfois précisément le texte de Shakespeare. Les histoires sont cependant plus courtes que les pièces, car elles adoptent une narration en prose, et que les intrigues secondaires sont parfois raccourcies. Le niveau de langue est (...)

Clifford Armion, Vincent Brault - publié le 27/06/2013

L'enjeu de cette étude est la découverte des gravures de Hogarth, peintre anglais du XVIIIè siècle et la possibilité de réutiliser ces images dans des cours d'anglais de classe de collège et de lycée.

Clifford Armion - publié le 26/06/2013

La série la plus célèbre de Hogarth est une satire du mariage arrangé entre l'héritier d'une famille noble désargentée et la fille d'un riche bourgeois de Londres. Les tableaux, peints par Hogarth entre 1743 et 1745, se vendirent mal ; cent vingt Guinées alors que l'encadrement à lui seul en avait coûté vingt-quatre. Ces toiles qui font aujourd'hui partie des collections de la national Gallery sont peintes à l'envers du sens voulu pour les gravures, cela pour éviter le travail (...)

Isabelle Baudino - publié le 26/06/2013

William Hogarth (1697-1764) était connu de son temps pour son talent de conteur. Il n'était certes pas le premier peintre à vouloir raconter des histoires en images mais, il s'y employa avec une vivacité et une inventivité toujours renouvelées au cours de sa carrière. De même, sans être le premier peintre à rassembler des tableaux en séries, il s'appliqua à élaborer des récits picturaux autonomes (non asservis à des textes) et modernes (abordant des sujets de son époque, campés (...)

Nicole Henry - publié le 26/06/2013

L'enjeu de cette étude est la découverte des gravures de Hogarth, peintre anglais du XVIIIè siècle et la possibilité de réutiliser ces images dans des cours d'anglais de classe de collège et de lycée.

publié le 25/06/2013

Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre ((England)) du graveur anglais William Hogarth.

publié le 25/06/2013

Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre ((Marriage à-la-mode)) du graveur anglais William Hogarth.

publié le 25/06/2013

Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre ((Taste in High Life)) du graveur anglais William Hogarth.