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Ted Hughes: Who wants to live forever?

Publié par Clifford Armion le 10/08/2010

Cahal Milmo

"In 1995, Ted Hughes wrote to a friend that some of the poems he had written about his relationship with Sylvia Plath were just too personal to be published at that time. Among them would have been Last Letter, a work written in several drafts in a blue 1970s exercise book and then finally typed out - a sign that the former poet laureate considered the poem finished.

"Some 12 years after Hughes' death, Last Letter was published for the first time yesterday after his widow, Carol, directed the broadcaster and writer Melvyn Bragg to the drafts of the poem among the 465 folders of material which constitute the poet's archive in the British Library and also handed over her late husband's typed transcript.

"The poem, a final coda to one of 20th-century literature's most fraught and tragic romances, was hailed as the "missing link" in Hughes' writing about his American first wife, who gassed herself at the age of 30 in February 1963. It is the first time that Hughes has directly addressed the events of Plath's death."

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Pour citer cette ressource :

"Ted Hughes: Who wants to live forever?", La Clé des Langues [en ligne], Lyon, ENS de LYON/DGESCO (ISSN 2107-7029), août 2010. Consulté le 07/05/2021. URL: http://cle.ens-lyon.fr/anglais/archives/archives-revue-de-presse/ted-hughes-who-wants-to-live-forever-