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Margaret Thatcher: A champion of freedom for workers, nations and the world

Publié par Clifford Armion le 04/09/2013

Charles Moore

Margaret Thatcher loved her country. Like Charles de Gaulle in France, she had a certain idea of it. This idea was forged by a God-fearing, hard-working provincial childhood and by the Second World War. She believed in our strenuous virtues. The British, to her, were brave and free and unique. When, during the Falklands crisis, she suddenly found war leadership thrust upon her, she quoted Shakespeare: ''Nought shall make us rue if England to itself do rest but true.’’ She wanted Britain – and especially England – to be true to itself.
After the Conservative government of Edward Heath lost the general election of February 1974, Mrs Thatcher realised, quite suddenly, that her nation was failing. At home, trade union power, over-government, over-borrowing, high taxes, inflation, were destroying it. On the international scene, Soviet Communism was threatening the future of freedom in the West. Until that time, she had believed, almost deferentially, that the men in charge could put things right. Now she saw that they hadn’t, and couldn’t. She began to think that perhaps a woman could.
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"Margaret Thatcher: A champion of freedom for workers, nations and the world ", La Clé des Langues [en ligne], Lyon, ENS de LYON/DGESCO (ISSN 2107-7029), septembre 2013. Consulté le 14/05/2021. URL: http://cle.ens-lyon.fr/anglais/archives/archives-revue-de-presse/margaret-thatcher-a-champion-of-freedom-for-workers-nations-and-the-world-