Vous êtes ici : Accueil / par_theme

Recherche multi-critères

Liste des résultats

Il y a 18 éléments qui correspondent à vos termes de recherche.
All men are created equal? Barack Obama and the American Revolution par Steven Sarson, publié le 28/03/2019
Barack Obama believes that the American nation's founding documents—the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution (including the Bill of Rights)—have been the driving forces of American history and remain the foundations of American politics today. In this talk we will explore Obama's analyses of these documents and of their legacies since, in particular in relation to slavery, the Civil War, Jim Crow, and Civil Rights. We will look at the words of Barack Obama, as derived from his writings and speeches, and also at historical sources from the time of the American Revolution, through the Civil War, and to the Civil Rights era.
article.png
From traditional dystopias to teenage dystopias: Harry Potter as a bridge between two cultures par Eléonore Cartellier-Veuillen, publié le 25/04/2016
“From traditional dystopias to teenage dystopias: Harry Potter as a bridge between two cultures” seeks to explain the key role that the Harry Potter novels have played in the creation of the Young Adult dystopian genre which has flourished in recent years. It focuses on three aspects of dystopia (mind-control, death and resistance) to show how these themes taken from traditional dystopias are re-written to shape such contemporary works as Uglies, The Hunger Games and Divergent.
article.png
David Treuer: Forgotten World / Forgotten Words par David Treuer, publié le 18/09/2014
We speak confidently and playfully about the “death of the author” but not one wants to seriously consider the death of literature. But this is precisely what we risk when we treat literature as ethnography, or worse, as the last living remnants of what seem to be vanishing cultures. We don’t read novels, at any rate, to educate ourselves. Or if we do we shouldn’t. And if we do commit this soul error we don’t enjoy novels because of the information they contain. Rather, we enjoy them, we clutch novels to our very souls because they move us, surprise us, transport us, entertain us, shock us, and (ultimately) trick us into caring about people and places that don’t exist and never existed.
article.png
Nikolai Grozni: The Whispers of Music Lost par Nikolai Grozni, publié le 10/09/2014
“Only the words break the silence, all other sounds have ceased,” writes Beckett in his Texts for Nothing. Or does he sing it? If words were the only sounds, then a sentence would be the only melody. We might never understand which came first—the words or the melody. Perhaps the first humans knew how to sing long before they knew how to talk. In this Dionysian vision of antiquity, all mortals were originally musicians. Music was the only thing that mattered. People understood each other by inventing mimetic melodies and singing together in tune. They appeared, loved, suffered, worshipped the gods and died like opera singers on stage.
article.png
Kirsty Gunn: Sound and Writing par Kirsty Gunn, publié le 08/09/2014
That sound you hear, as though coming off the lonely Scottish hills, through the fine Highland air, passing across straths and glens, along rivers and to the sea... Is the sound of the piobaireachd, the classical music of the great Highland bagpipe, a music made for Gatherings, Salutes and Laments, a grand and grave and complicated music - Ceol Mor it is in Gaelic - The Big Music. The Big Music, too, is the title of my latest work of fiction - not a novel, but an elegy, as Virginia Woolf described all her work - a story that sounds as much as it says... An experience of words, of a story of people and a landscape, of a love story played across generations, that nevertheless sounds in the mind...
article.png
Ambiguity (Siri Hustvedt) par Siri Hustvedt, publié le 03/07/2014
Chaque année les invités anglophones des Assises Internationales du Roman rédigent la définition d'un mot de leur choix. Les traductions françaises de ces textes ainsi que les mots-clés des auteurs de langue française des sept premières saisons des AIRs sont éditées par Christian Bourgois dans un volume intitulé le Lexique Nomade.
article.png
Circle (Nikolai Grozni) par Nikolai Grozni, publié le 01/07/2014
Chaque année les invités anglophones des Assises Internationales du Roman rédigent la définition d'un mot de leur choix. Les traductions françaises de ces textes ainsi que les mots-clés des auteurs de langue française des sept premières saisons des AIRs sont éditées par Christian Bourgois dans un volume intitulé le Lexique Nomade.
article.png
"As Many Fingers as Needed": The Body as Musician and its Fetishes par Peter Szendy, publié le 19/12/2013
"To comfortably acquire, so to speak, as many fingers as needed," said one of Bach’s sons, Carl Philipp Emanuel, in his Essay on the True Art of Playing the Keyboard (1753). And these words are remarkable, as long as we are prepared to take them literally, and not hastily consider them as one of the metaphors that adorn discourse about music and on the bodies that it evokes.
article.png
The Essential David Shrigley par Johanna Felter, publié le 21/05/2013
"David Shrigley is a multidisciplinary artist who started his career in the early nineties self-publishing art books containing cartoon-like drawings for which he is mainly famous. Their trademarks, which are also recognizable in his varied artistic productions – clumsy execution, sloppy handwriting, disturbing or puzzling text, dark humour and uncanny atmosphere – helped Shrigley to gradually shape a clearly distinctive personality in his work which brought him out as one of the current key figures of British contemporary art scene."
article.png type-image.png
Not Looking for Love par Chris Kraus, publié le 17/12/2012
As women, we are often identified through our choice of sexual partners. When an “attractive” woman has sex with an ugly man, it is a descent into “abjection.” But why? Clearly, it is because as women, we are still believed to attain most of our identities through sexuality. In the present assimilationist climate, any non-monogamous, non-relational sexual act is read as a symptom of emotional damage. Our culture persists in believing that sex holds the magic key to a person’s identity — which is, of course, wrong — and in behaving as if female writers are uniquely charged with upholding the sacred intimacy of the sexual act.
article.png
For another Hysterature par Emilie Notéris, publié le 17/12/2012
Since the question of women’s freedom in writing, or “Why stories of transgression or women’s assertions of freedom are less tolerated than those of men?” only highlight ordinary male chauvinism (the answer to the question is undeniably related to cultural issues), I prefer to focus on the counter strategies that can be deployed in response to the insults made to women, like the one Eileen Myles describes in her introduction to I love Dick by Chris Kraus, What about Chris?: “She’s turned female abjection inside out and aimed it at a man.” In other words, rather than identifying the reasons for the violent reception of women’s transgressive writing, I prefer to think about the strategies that can flow from them.
article.png
The Words of the Flesh par Wendy Delorme, publié le 11/12/2012
There are people who write from the place that they have been assigned. Some of them with rage so as to get away from it; others, by contrast, who follow the path that has been mapped out for us. There are those who would rather stay on the margin of that space, away from the feminine, off-centered, but are then dragged back to it, kicking and screaming. Their words are women's words, words that are situated. The masculine remains the universal reference. Feminine words stay in the realm of the singular, indexed to the gender of who said them.
article.png
The Neurosciences and Literature: an “exquisite corpse” or a “meeting of the minds”? par Lionel Naccache, publié le 16/02/2012
In the context of the Walls and Bridges project in New York, a meeting has been organized for October between an American novelist - Siri Hustvedt - and a French neuroscientist on the topic of "fiction," both mental and literary. This will obviously be the time to ask ourselves: can we imagine a promising future for meetings between the neurosciences of cognition and the world of literary creation? Is this merely the random juxtaposition of two terms to which we are attached, or the genuine dialectical culmination of self-consciousness? An amusing, trendy quid pro quo, or a key moment in our knowledge of ourselves as tale tellers?
article.png
Three Words for Dmitri Dmitriyevich Shostakovich par Wendy Lesser, publié le 14/02/2012
As an element in Shostakovich's music, the shame is perhaps not as audible as the dread, but it is everpresent nonetheless. One cannot point to a precise place in the music where you can hear it, but it underlies and supports most of the other painful emotions, and if it were removed from the mix, you would certainly notice the difference. The shame is apparent in the harshness with which Shostakovich treats himself and his own feelings; it saves the saddest quartets (like the Eighth) from self-pity, and it saves the more cheerful ones (like the Sixth) from any tincture of smugness or self-assurance...
article.png
The Actual Lives of Catherine Millet and Robert Storr par Catherine Millet, Robert Storr, publié le 19/01/2012
De part et d'autre de l'Atlantique, Catherine Millet et Robert Storr ont joué un rôle clef, comme témoins et acteurs, dans la transformation du monde de l'art. Catherine Millet, auteur des best-sellers La Vie sexuelle de Catherine M. et Jalousie et rédactrice en chef du magazine Art Press, rencontrera Robert Storr, ancien conservateur du MoMa de New York et doyen de la Faculté des Beaux-arts de l'université de Yale, pour discuter de leurs nombreux intérêts communs, de leurs carrières parfois entremêlées et de la scène artistique contemporaine. Le dialogue entre ces deux collègues et amis apportera un éclairage sur le monde toujours changeant et surprenant de l'art contemporain et dévoilera l'itinéraire artistique et intellectuel de deux de ses acteurs les plus éloquents. On both sides of the Atlantic, Catherine Millet and Robert Storr have played key rolesas witnesses and actorsin the transformations of the art world. Catherine Millet, author of bestsellers The Sexual Life of Catherine M and Jealousy and editor-in-chief of Art Press magazine, will join Robert Storr, former curator of MoMA and the dean of the School of Art at Yale University, to discuss their wide-ranging interests, their intermingled careers, and the current art scene.
conference.png type-video.png
From buds to flowers: the blossoming of constructions in child language par Aliyah Morgenstern, publié le 18/12/2009
In the course of their development, children make their way along successive transitory systems with their own internal coherence. We will present the paths they follow from gestures and first words to complex constructions embedded in their dialogic context, developing both linguistic, conversational and social skills necessary to full mastery of language. Our data shows that the use of grammatical forms is irregular in terms of canonical syntax but not random, and corresponds to particular semantic/pragmatic features.
conference.png type-video.png
The Intricacies of Onomastics in Harry Potter and its French Translation par Carole Mulliez, publié le 16/11/2009
To put it in a nutshell, here, I am going to consider two categories in the vast corpus of Rowling's proper nouns, namely character naming and place naming. I would like to show that not only do they point at one single instance but also that they are in keeping with the reference characteristics - or sometimes misleading - ; that they contain cultural echoes and plays on words; and that their sounds are also appropriate. To conclude I am going to underline how difficult it must have been for translators to find a satisfactory solution as a result.
article.png
Fiche de lecture : Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, Jonathan Safran Foer par Alice Bonzom, publié le 07/05/2008
The novel narrates the story of Oskar Schell, a precocious nine-year-old inventor, pacifist, percussionist, and Francophile, whose father died during the attacks of 9/11. A couple of years after his father’s death, he finds a mysterious key in an envelope with the name “Black” on it, in a vase in a closet. Sure that the key belonged to his father, he decides to visit everyone named “Black” in the five boroughs of New York to discover what it opens. Intertwined with Oskar’s quest are letters written by his grandparents, who went through the bombings of Dresden in the Second World War.
article.png