Vous êtes ici : Accueil / À consulter également

À consulter également

7 ressources contiennent le mot-clé migration.

Rechercher aussi dans titre et résumé (recherche structurée).

Alienation and defamiliarization in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Americanah (2013)

par Annalena Geisler, publié le 15/06/2022

article.png In Americanah, Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie tells the story of high school lovers Ifemelu and Obinze, their experiences of migration to the US and the UK, and their reunion 13 years later back in Nigeria. Through the means of defamiliarization and the depiction of Ifemelu’s sense of alienation in the US, Adichie sheds new light on America’s relationship with race and racism.

Mobility and Immobility in Colm Tóibín’s Brooklyn: Migration as a Static Initiatory Journey

par Coline Pavia, publié le 01/07/2020

article.png Colm Tóibín’s Brooklyn centres on Eilis Lacey’s migration from Ireland to Brooklyn. The protagonist’s spatial mobility is accompanied by an identity change, as her self evolves when she settles in New York. Although she embarks on an initiatory journey through migration, Eilis faces various forms of immobility: the American territory resembles Ireland, and she is confronted to family duty when she thought she would escape it. This article therefore shows that the protagonist’s migration in Brooklyn is paradoxically mainly static, in terms of both space and identity. However, Eilis’s mobility still fosters a form of inner transformation as she is faced with a division between her Irish and American homes and between two selves that are irreconcilable.

Immigration to the United States of America: Current Challenges and Debates

par Anne-Kathrin Marquardt, publié le 11/05/2017

type-image.png article.png This paper, written in April 2017, gives an overview of recent immigration to the United States and the immigrant population of America. It outlines the consequences for the demographics and politics of the country and summarises the contentious issues in the debate around immigration reform. It focuses on executive action taken since 2012, during the Obama and Trump presidencies, right up to the present day.

Entretien avec Zia Haider Rahman: In the Light of What We Know

par Zia Haider Rahman, publié le 27/03/2017

type-video.png texte.png entretien.png Zia Haider Rahman, originaire du Bangladesh, écrit son premier roman, In the Light of What We Know, après une carrière sur Wall Street et auprès de l’ONU. Une plume sobre et fluide mène le lecteur du Bangladesh rural à New York et aux campements de l’ONU en Afghanistan. Les deux personnages principaux, vivant chacun des décalages culturels entre leurs origines et le monde qu’ils habitent, semblent marqués par le constat qu’un exilé pourrait finalement n’être « qu’un immigré avec une bibliothèque ». Le 26 mai 2016, à l'occasion des Assises Internationales du Roman, Zia Haider Rahman a accepté de nous parler de son roman. En résulte un entretien passionnant qui couvre des sujets aussi variés que les mathématiques, l'industrie de l'édition, le passé colonial de la Grande-Bretagne et la lutte des classes.

Minorities and democracy

par Siddhartha Deb, publié le 17/01/2014

article.png In 1916, the Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore delivered a series of lectures that would eventually be collected into the book, Nationalism. Tagore was writing in the glow of his own celebrity (he had just won the Nobel Prize for literature) and from within the heart of the crisis engulfing the modern world, two years into the slow, grim war that had converted Europe into a labyrinth of trenches covered over with clouds of poison gas. For Tagore, this was the tragic but inevitable outcome of a social calculus that valued efficiency, profit and, especially, the spirit of us versus them that bonded together the inhabitants of one nation and allowed them to go out, conquer and enslave other people, most of them members of no nation at all.

Doug Saunders on migration

par Doug Saunders, Clifford Armion, publié le 05/12/2013

entretien.png type-video.png texte.png Migration almost always follows the same pattern. It doesn’t go from one country to another country. It goes from a cluster of villages or a sub-rural region to specific urban neighbourhoods. Those urban neighbourhoods which are usually low-income, with low housing cost, serve as the bottom rung of the ladder for people arriving in a new country.

The Young Lords

par Johanna Fernandez, Claire Richard, publié le 22/01/2013

article.png entretien.png type-video.png The Young Lords were the children of the first large wave of Puerto Rican migration to the North East of the United States, in cities like New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and Hartford. The Young Lords was begun not in New York, interestingly enough, but in Chicago. And it was initiated by the efforts of the leader of the Young Lords, who initially in Chicago had been a gang. Cha Cha Jimenez, who was the leader of that gang, worked with a leader of the Black Panther Party, Fred Hampton, to transform this gang into a political organization.