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Roundtable on Literary Studies in the United States par Christine Froula, Sandra Gustafson, publié le 12/09/2019
Christine Froula (Northwestern University) and Sandra Gustafson (University of Notre Dame) were guest lecturers at the ENS de Lyon in May 2019 and participated in a roundtable on Literary Studies in the US today. The roundtable was moderated by Vanessa Guignery and François Specq, both Professors at the ENS.
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Reconfigurations of space in Partition novels par Sandrine Soukaï, publié le 19/09/2019
This article examines two Indian novels Clear Light of Day (1980) by Anita Desai and The Shadow Lines (1988) by Amitav Ghosh along with Burnt Shadows (2009) by Anglo-Pakistani novelist Kamila Shamsie, books written about the Partition of India that accompanied independence in 1947. Partition led to violence on an enormous scale; the exact number of people who were killed has never been ascertained, and estimates vary between one and two million. Partition also caused massive displacements of population, estimated between 12 and 18 million. This paper examines the way in which space – national, familial and communal – was divided and then reshaped by and through Partition. After discussing the fractures, ruptures and uprooting brought about by this trauma, I will consider the way in which diasporic writers devise fictional maps of memory of the past that foster exchanges across geographical borders.
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The Gay Liberation Front and queer rights in the UK: a conversation with Jeffrey Weeks par Jeffrey Weeks, publié le 23/05/2019
Jeffrey Weeks is a gay activist and historian specialising in the history of sexuality. His work includes Socialism and the New Life (1977) and Coming Out: Homosexual Politics in Britain from the Nineteenth Century to the Present (1977). He was invited at the LGBT Centre in Lyon to talk about his latest book What is sexual history (2016), which has been translated in French and published by the Presses Universitaires de Lyon. The discussion was moderated by Quentin Zimmerman.
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Not Looking for Love par Chris Kraus, publié le 17/12/2012
As women, we are often identified through our choice of sexual partners. When an “attractive” woman has sex with an ugly man, it is a descent into “abjection.” But why? Clearly, it is because as women, we are still believed to attain most of our identities through sexuality. In the present assimilationist climate, any non-monogamous, non-relational sexual act is read as a symptom of emotional damage. Our culture persists in believing that sex holds the magic key to a person’s identity — which is, of course, wrong — and in behaving as if female writers are uniquely charged with upholding the sacred intimacy of the sexual act.
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For another Hysterature par Emilie Notéris, publié le 17/12/2012
Since the question of women’s freedom in writing, or “Why stories of transgression or women’s assertions of freedom are less tolerated than those of men?” only highlight ordinary male chauvinism (the answer to the question is undeniably related to cultural issues), I prefer to focus on the counter strategies that can be deployed in response to the insults made to women, like the one Eileen Myles describes in her introduction to I love Dick by Chris Kraus, What about Chris?: “She’s turned female abjection inside out and aimed it at a man.” In other words, rather than identifying the reasons for the violent reception of women’s transgressive writing, I prefer to think about the strategies that can flow from them.
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The Words of the Flesh par Wendy Delorme, publié le 11/12/2012
There are people who write from the place that they have been assigned. Some of them with rage so as to get away from it; others, by contrast, who follow the path that has been mapped out for us. There are those who would rather stay on the margin of that space, away from the feminine, off-centered, but are then dragged back to it, kicking and screaming. Their words are women's words, words that are situated. The masculine remains the universal reference. Feminine words stay in the realm of the singular, indexed to the gender of who said them.
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Declaration of Disinclinations par Lynne Tillman, publié le 11/12/2012
I like the theoretical ideal of neutrality, of non-hierarchical thinking. I’d like to be a writer, a person, but I am not. None of this naming is my choice. I’m a woman, “still” or I’m “only a woman.” “A good, bad woman, a silly, frivolous woman, an intelligent woman, a sweet woman, a harridan, bitch, whore, a fishmonger, gossipy woman. A woman writer.” What is “a woman writer”? Does “woman” cancel or negate “writer”? Create a different form of writer? Or does “woman” as an adjective utterly change the noun “writer”? “Man writer”? Not used. “Male writer,” rarely employed. Are there “man books” being read in “man caves?” OK, I declare: I’m a woman who writes, a person who writes. But how am I read?
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The Intensification of Punishment from Thatcher to Blair: From conservative authoritarianism to punitive interventionism par Emma Bell, publié le 12/03/2010
Emma Bell is a Senior Lecturer in British Studies at Savoie University (Chambéry). Her research focuses on contemporary British penal policy. She will be publishing a book on the subject entitled Criminal Justice and Neoliberalism at the end of 2010 with Palgrave Macmillan.
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Krishnendu Ray: Taste, Toil and Ethnicity par Krishnendu Ray, publié le 30/11/2015
En partenariat avec les départements de Food Studies de la New School et de New York University, le Festival Mode d'Emploi 2015 propose une réflexion sur les migrations du goût. Diplômé de sciences politiques et de sociologie, Krishnendu Ray est professeur de Food Studies et à la tête du Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health à l’Université de New York. À travers ses différents ouvrages, il s’intéresse à la façon dont les immigrés combinent leur culture alimentaire à leur nouveau mode de vie.
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Anti-americanism par Paul Hollander , publié le 09/04/2009
Professeur émérite de sociologie à l'université du Massachusetts (Amherst) et membre du Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies de Harvard, Paul Hollander s'est distingué par ses travaux sur le communisme, la violence, les relations est-ouest et l'anti-américanisme.
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Fabio Parasecoli - Food, migrants, and the making of traditions par Fabio Parasecoli, publié le 30/11/2015
Fabio Parasecoli is a professor and director of food studies projects at the New School of New York. He chose to study societies and political systems through food, which, according to him, transmits traditions, and a perspective on the rest of the world. "Food is more than just physical sustenance: it produces meaning and sense, creating infinite culinary cultures where every ingredient, each dish, and meal structures are connected."
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Are You Going to Write That in Your Book? par Siddhartha Deb, publié le 03/12/2013
Born in north-eastern India in 1970, Siddhartha Deb is the recipient of grants from the Society of Authors in the UK and has been a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Studies at Harvard University. His latest book, a work of narrative nonfiction, ((The Beautiful and the Damned)), was a finalist for the Orwell Prize in the UK and the winner of the PEN Open award in the United States. His journalism, essays, and reviews have appeared in Harpers, The Guardian, The Observer, The New York Times, Bookforum, The Daily Telegraph, The Nation, n+1, and The Times Literary Supplement.
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Wayne Koestenbaum - Notes on Affinity par Wayne Koestenbaum, publié le 18/04/2011
Wayne Koestenbaum (États-Unis), poète, romancier et essayiste, est l'auteur d'une œuvre protéiforme et subversive qui explore les multiples facettes de l'identité américaine à travers de nombreux thèmes (les arts, la célébrité, les gender studies...) et où se mêlent les cultures littéraire, artistique, musicale et populaire. Dans Hotel Theory, il met en regard une enquête philosophique sur les hôtels et le récit d'une rencontre improbable entre deux icônes de la culture américaine : l'actrice mythique Lana Turner et la star du music-hall Liberace.
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The Language of Gesture: Melville's Imaging of Blackness and the Modernity of Billy Budd par Klaus Benesch , publié le 04/01/2010
In light of recent studies of both the life of black seamen and of the role of blacks in the Enlightenment, the paper discusses the representation of African sailors in the work of Herman Melville, in particular in his unfinished manuscript Billy Budd, Sailor. As I argue, Melville's imaging of a "noble" black sailor in the opening chapter is crucial to the author's ongoing attempt to untangle the complex relationship of race and modernity. By invoking a non-totalitarian, gestural/visual aesthetics of blackness Melville not only reinforces his earlier critique of modernity's foundation in slavery; he also revivifies and, simultaneously, trans-forms the eighteenth-century tradition of visualizing blacks as tragic witnesses to the para-doxes of the enlightenment. In so doing, Melville couches his argument against racism in a 'gestural' (black) critique of white judgments on blacks that may well be read to foreshadow later, more radical gestures of black pride from zoot-suiters to the raised fists of black pan-thers or the corporeal self-fashioning of the gangster rapper.
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