Vous êtes ici : Accueil / par_theme

Recherche multi-critères

Liste des résultats

Il y a 4 éléments qui correspondent à vos termes de recherche.
We’re Going on a Bear Hunt: Traditional and Counter-traditional Aspects of a Classic Children’s Book par Véronique Alexandre, publié le 07/07/2017
The read-aloud book We’re Going on a Bear Hunt, “retold” by Michael Rosen and illustrated by Helen Oxenbury designed for very young children may be unlikely teaching material for EFL students in French middle and senior schools. But if studied in conjunction with the video released by The Guardian in 2014 to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the book, and if additional literary and artistic references are brought into the lesson plan, the teaching project may prove rewarding on many levels.
article.png
Teaching Humanities par Gayatri Spivak, publié le 06/05/2015
Fifty years of institutional teaching has brought me this lesson: try to learn to learn how to teach this group, for me the two ends of the spectrum: Columbia University in the City of New York and six elementary schools on the border between West Bengal and Jharkhand. Everything I say will be marked by this. I take my motto from Kafka: “Perhaps there is only one cardinal sin: Impatience. Because of impatience we were driven out of Paradise, because of impatience we cannot return.”
article.png
Roosevelt’s Political Discourse: Grounded in a Liberal Protestant Worldview par Andrew Ives, publié le 05/03/2015
This paper will argue that Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s political discourse was profoundly influenced by his liberal Protestant worldview. The paper begins with some background on Roosevelt’s Christian upbringing. It moves on to show how FDR consistently used Protestant precepts and Biblical allusions as a rhetorical tool to gain electoral support. However, the author argues that Roosevelt’s simple yet profound Christian faith went far beyond this purely rhetorical usage and that liberal Protestant teachings in fact structured his political philosophy.
article.png
All the World’s a Folly : Theatricality and Intertextuality in Paul Auster’s The Brooklyn Follies par Brigitte Friant-Kessler, publié le 11/12/2009
There is a manner in which Auster's revisiting classic sources is not merely a simple lift or a citation from the work when he playfully offers a postmodern context to old texts, especially with major literary figures in the wings. As J. Dupont argues in his introductory note to The Brooklyn Follies : "It would however be an exhaustingly vain task to try and undertake a census of the literary intertexts that run beneath the surface of Auster's work". Such an attempt is all the more so destined to be a failure as there are, beside the clearly stated references, less obvious, possibly unavowed though not any the less significant, undercurrents of intertextuality to be traced in Auster's Brooklyn Follies. Were there only one idiosyncratic trait to be highlighted in Auster's style, it would obviously be his taste for patch-working...
article.png