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Brexit Shorts: Dramas From a Divided Nation par Marion Coste, publié le 12/04/2019
Cette ressource présente le projet des « Brexit Shorts », série de neuf courts-métrages diffusés un an après le résultat du référendum sur la sortie de l’Union européenne. Vous trouverez sur cette page quelques pistes d'analyse, puis la série de courts-métrages dans son intégralité.
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Nature after Wordsworth in Dance of the Happy Shades by Alice Munro par Christine Lorre-Johnston, publié le 01/03/2016
Alice Munro has acknowledged the influence of Wordsworth’s works and ideas on her own outlook, particularly where the idea of nature is concerned. Yet this cultural link has seldom been explored. Starting from this observation, this article proposes a few research directions by examining the concept of nature in Munro’s first collection of short stories, Dance of the Happy Shades (1968), successively as an experience of “the call of the wild,” then in the form of geology, and last, as overall framework for contemporary ecological changes.
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Brigitte Gauthier : Le scénario à l'américaine par Brigitte Gauthier, publié le 29/06/2015
Brigitte Gauthier nous offre un parcours de formation accéléré en écriture de scénario, reprenant les grands principes des ouvrages américains qui font aujourd’hui l’unanimité chez les scénaristes, comme le célèbre Story de Robert McKee dont elle a assuré la traduction française…
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End of Story par Avital Ronell, publié le 19/01/2015
"For my part, I practice affirmative dissociation. Prompted mostly by a Nietzschean will to fiction and love of masks, I “fake it ‘til I make it,” assuming shrewd yet fragile identities, rotating signatures, reappropriating for myself syntactical maneuvers and rhetorical feints."
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Writing on the self par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 14/11/2014
Critics and academics tend to draw a line between autobiography and fiction. However, it is sometimes difficult to make such a clear distinction between what is made up and what is not. Here are some short texts written by authors who reflect on their use of the first person.
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Scotland’s No par Alistair Cole, publié le 29/09/2014
Shortly before the Scottish referendum on independence, I visited the impressive city of Glasgow, Scotland’s largest city. Though the Scottish referendum eventually produced a No of over 55%, the once second largest city in the Empire was one of only four districts to vote Yes (just over 53%). I had correctly judged the atmosphere in this city, but elsewhere the story was rather different. In 28 of the remaining 32 districts, the No vote carried the day, including in SNP stronghold areas such as Angus and Perthshire...
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Kirsty Gunn: Sound and Writing par Kirsty Gunn, publié le 08/09/2014
That sound you hear, as though coming off the lonely Scottish hills, through the fine Highland air, passing across straths and glens, along rivers and to the sea... Is the sound of the piobaireachd, the classical music of the great Highland bagpipe, a music made for Gatherings, Salutes and Laments, a grand and grave and complicated music - Ceol Mor it is in Gaelic - The Big Music. The Big Music, too, is the title of my latest work of fiction - not a novel, but an elegy, as Virginia Woolf described all her work - a story that sounds as much as it says... An experience of words, of a story of people and a landscape, of a love story played across generations, that nevertheless sounds in the mind...
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Lorna Goodison: a short story par Lorna Goodison, publié le 05/09/2014
Dans le cadre de notre partenariat avec la Villa Gillet, nous avons le plaisir de publier cette délicieuse historiette de Lorna Goodison sur les rapports conjugaux…
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Rachel Cusk: Love narratives par Rachel Cusk, publié le 28/08/2014
If it’s true that we use narrative as a frame to make sense of the randomness of our human experience, then the story of romantic love might be seen as reflecting our profoundest anxieties about who and what we are, about what happens to us and why. The love narrative is ostensibly a story of progress, yet its true goal is to achieve an ending, a place of finality where nothing further needs to happen and the tension between fantasy and reality can cease. At the wedding of man and woman a veil is drawn, an ending arrived at: the reader closes the book, for marriage as it is lived represents the re-assertion of reality over narrative. Having committed this public act of participation and belief in the notion of life as a story, man and woman are left to order and confer meaning on their private experiences as best they can...
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Story (Zoyâ Pirzâd) par Zoya Pirzad, publié le 04/04/2014
Chaque année, les invités des Assises Internationales du Roman rédigent la définition d'un mot de leur choix : il s'agit ici du mot "story", défini par l'auteure iranienne Zoyâ Pirzâd.
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Family Histories par Ian Buruma, publié le 16/12/2013
When I was at primary school in the Netherlands in the late 1950s and early 1960s, history was still taught as a story of great men, kings, generals, national heroes, and of course great villains, mostly foreigners. In our case, this meant a succession of Williams of Orange, Admiral Tromp, Philip II, the Duke of Alva, Napoleon, Hitler, and so on. As a reaction to this kind of thing, historians of the left began to focus on systems: fascist, late capitalist, communist, totalitarian. Hannah Arendt’s take on the Eichmann trial, though not the work of a typical leftist, contributed to this tendency, as did the work of Adorno. I have often suspected that they favored systemic analyses, because they couldn’t bring themselves to face what had gone so badly wrong specifically in their beloved Germany. The responsibility of Germans, such as Heidegger, was not the issue; it had to be a systemic failure.
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Taking History Personnally par Cynthia Carr, publié le 12/12/2013
Two black men were lynched in Marion, Indiana, on the night of August 7, 1930. That was my father’s hometown, the town where I have my roots, and I heard this story when I was a little girl: The night it happened someone called my grandfather, whose shift at the Post Office began at three in the morning. "Don’t walk through the courthouse square tonight on your way to work," the caller said. "You might see something you don’t want to see." Apparently that was the punchline, which puzzled me. Something you don’t want to see. Then laughter. I was in my late twenties — my grandfather long dead — when I first came upon the photo of this lynching in a book. It has become an iconic image of racial injustice in America: two black men in bloody tattered clothing hang from a tree and below them stand the grinning, gloating, proud and pleased white folks.
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In Praise of Babel par Robyn Creswell, publié le 22/11/2013
Like Jewish and Christian commentators, Muslim exegetes understood the Babel story to be a parable of how mankind’s hubris, in the form of a desire for knowledge or an attempt to reach the heavens, leads to divine punishment. The subsequent confusion of human idioms and scattering of peoples is a second fall from grace, an expulsion from the paradise of monolingualism. Henceforth, translation becomes at once necessary and impossible—impossible in the sense that no translation could ever match the transparency of the original Ur-Sprache. So the Islamic tradition, like the Judaic one in particular, comes to bear a tremendous nostalgia for the lost language of Eden.
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David Vann: Secret and subtext par David Vann, publié le 07/10/2013
All of the conventions of literary fiction can be successfully broken except one: there must be subtext, a second story beneath the surface. We don’t have to care about a protagonist or even really have a protagonist. We’re not limited to any particular style or structure. But our entire idea of literature being “about” something is based on a second narrative, something else that the surface narrative can point to. What’s interesting to me about this is that we live in a time when surface narratives are taking over. Blogs are generally so worthless for this one reason, that they lack subtext. The online world is, above all, earnest, saying exactly what it means.
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Goldie Goldbloom: Portraits and Faces - Appearance and Disfigurement par Goldie Goldbloom, publié le 27/09/2013
Chekhov is well known for his impartial observations of his characters and for his grasp of “realism”. When I first read his description of the lady with the little dog, I discovered that she is “a fair-haired young lady of medium height, wearing a beret.” I was puzzled. This less than enthusiastic description of the woman Gurov will come to love leaves out many basic details such as the colour of Anna Sergeyevna’s eyes and whether she has an attractive figure. I wondered why Chekhov departs from the wordier earlier traditions of written portraiture, and how his simple sketch of Anna illustrated the “realism” for which he is known.
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Kate O'Riordan: Visions of Ireland - A writer's view par Kate O'Riordan, publié le 17/09/2013
A Londoner by adoption, Kate O’Riordan grew up in the small city of Bantry on the west coast of Ireland. With Le Garçon dans la lune, published in 2008 and Pierres de mémoire, in 2009, O’Riordan signed two new remarkable opuses in which she questions family relationships. A novelist and short-story writer, Kate O’Riordan also writes for the cinema and continues to confirm her legitimate place among Irish authors who count. She came to the Villa Gillet to take part in a discussion on 'Ireland by Irish writers'.
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Understanding the social media: an interview with Jeffrey Rosen par Jeffrey Rosen, Clifford Armion, publié le 10/01/2013
Now that we’re living most of our lives online, all of us are vulnerable to the internet. The difficulty with young people is that they may not have experienced the dangers of not being able to escape your past until it’s too late. I like to tell the story of Stacy Sneider, the young 22 year old teacher in training who posted a picture of herself on Myspace wearing a pirate’s hat and drinking from a plastic cup that said drunken pirate. Her supervisor at the school said she was promoting drinking and she was fired. She sued and was unable to get her job back and she had to pick an entirely different career. That’s a very dramatic example on how vulnerable all of us are to being judged out of context by a single image or ill chosen picture and once you do that it may be very hard to escape your past.
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The cultural perception of the American land: a short history par Mireille Chambon-Pernet, publié le 20/11/2012
The importance of land and nature in the American culture is widely known. The Pilgrim Fathers who landed on the coast of the Massachussetts in 1620 were looking for freedom which was both spiritual and material. The latter derived from land ownership, as a landowner called no man master. Yet, in 1893, Jackson Turner announced that: “the American character did not spring full-blown from the Mayflower” “ It came out of the forests and gained new strength each time it touched a frontier”.
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Nicholson Baker on his literary career and how he came to write about sex par Nicholson Baker, publié le 13/06/2012
I think the job of the novelist is to write about interesting things, including things that might not seem all that interesting at first glance--like, say, a lunch hour on an ordinary weekday – and to offer evidence that life is worth living. At least, that’s what I try to do – not always successfully. My first book was about a lunch hour – the second about sitting in a rocking chair holding a baby – the third about literary ambition. There was almost no sex in those three books. But I always wanted to be a pornographer – because after all sex is amazing and irrational and embarrassing and endlessly worth thinking about. My fourth book was called Vox, and it was about two strangers telling stories to each other on the phone. I decided to write it as one big sex scene, because if you’re going to do it, do it.
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Stylistics from Scratch: My ‘Take’ on Stylistics and How to Go About a Stylistic Analysis par Mick Short, publié le 24/04/2012
Mick Short was invited by Manuel Jobert as part of the tenth edition of the Discourse Analysis Conferences, organised by the Société de Stylistique Anglaise and Lyon 3. After giving some precious advice to students in stylistics and explaining the "foregrounding theory", he analysed a number of texts including the front page of a British tabloid, a poem by Robert Frost and a passage from Colum McCann’s Let the Great World Spin.
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Katherine Mansfield’s Short Stories: An Introduction par Emilie Walezak , publié le 28/06/2011
Katherine Mansfield wrote short stories exclusively and produced a large body of work though she died quite young from tuberculosis when she was 30. She is one the best representatives of modernist short story writing. Virginia Woolf herself admitted to Mansfield that she was jealous of her writing: "and then Morgan Foster said the Prelude and The Voyage Out were the best novels of their time, and I said damn Katherine! Why can't I be the only woman who knows how to write?"
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Miss Brill (1920) par Katherine Mansfield, publié le 28/06/2011
Texte de la nouvelle accompagné de l'enregistrement d'une lecture de ce texte.
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The Searchlight (1944) par Virginia Woolf, publié le 28/06/2011
Texte de la nouvelle accompagné de l'enregistrement d'une lecture de ce texte.
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The Legacy (1944) par Virginia Woolf, publié le 28/06/2011
Texte de la nouvelle accompagné de l'enregistrement d'une lecture de ce texte.
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Les histoires de William Hogarth par Isabelle Baudino, publié le 01/04/2011
William Hogarth (1697-1764) était connu de son temps pour son talent de conteur. Il n'était certes pas le premier peintre à vouloir raconter des histoires en images mais, il s'y employa avec une vivacité et une inventivité toujours renouvelées au cours de sa carrière. De même, sans être le premier peintre à rassembler des tableaux en séries, il s'appliqua à élaborer des récits picturaux autonomes (non asservis à des textes) et modernes (abordant des sujets de son époque, campés par des personnages en costumes contemporains évoluant dans des décors vraisemblables, voire reconnaissables)...
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Introduction à The God of Small Things d'Arundhati Roy par Florence Labaune-Demeule, publié le 21/03/2011
The God of Small Things, roman publié en 1997, permit à son auteur, la romancière indienne Arundhati Roy, de recevoir le Booker Prize la même année. Publié dans de nombreux pays et traduit en plus de quarante langues, ce roman a été applaudi à maintes reprises par la critique, notamment en raison de l'analyse subtile des relations humaines qui y est abordée. Comme le dit A. Roy elle-même, « The book really delves, very deep I think, into human nature. The story tells of the brutality we're capable of, but also that aching, intimate love [shared by twins]. »
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Promoting patients in narrative discourse: A developmental perspective par Harriet Jisa , publié le 18/12/2009
Languages provide speakers with a number of structural options for manipulating the expression of events in narrative discourse. Underlying narrative competence is the capacity to view events as dynamic actions composed of a bundle of elements such as, agent, patient, affectedness, etc. (Hopper and Thompson, 1980). This study examines the grammatical constructions used by children (5-6-, 7-8- and 10-11-year-olds) and adult speakers of Amharic, English, French and Hungarian to manipulate the expression of agent and patient participants in the expression of events. The narrative task used to elicit the data is composed of a series of pictures which recount the adventures of two principal characters (a boy and a dog) in search of their runaway frog (Frog, Where are you? Mayer 1969). Over the course of the story the boy and the dog encounter a host of secondary characters (a mole, an owl, a swarm of bees and a deer) and change participant status, going from controlling agent to affected patient of a secondary character's action. Our interest lies in the range of structures available in the languages studied and their use by children and adults in narrative discourse. We detail how children and adults native speakers of the four languages use topicalising constructions to promote the patient participant in an event to the starting point (Langacker, 1998) of the recounting of that event.
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The spoken word and the written word in Paul Auster’s The Brooklyn Follies par Catherine Pesso-Miquel, publié le 16/10/2009
This article analyses the construction of voices in Paul Auster’s The Brooklyn Follies, in which the paradoxical relationship between printed signs on a page and phonemes uttered by human bodies is fore-grounded. Auster revels in creating lively dialogues that are carefully inscribed within a particular voice through the use of didascalia, but he also celebrates the physicality and euphony of a narrative voice which navigates between elegiac lyricism and sharp-witted humour. The Brooklyn Follies, like all Auster’s books, is a book about books, but this one is also a book about tales and story-telling, about speech and silence, and the very American tradition of tall tales.
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Virginia Woolf's short stories - Eléments de bibliographie par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 23/04/2009
Quelques indications bibliographiques pour aborder l'étude des nouvelles Virginia Woolf, ainsi qu'une sélection d'articles disponibles en ligne.
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The “obstinate resistance” of Woolf’s short stories par Christine Reynier, publié le 31/03/2009
I have often wondered why, although I have regularly gone back to Virginia Woolf's short stories, I still feel I do not know them very well. This is of course no other than the secret charm of Woolf's short stories: they are so hermetic or puzzling that one cannot help re-reading them; they are so varied that one keeps forgetting them; they are so challenging that one feels bound to delve into them again and again. They offer the "obstinate resistance" (Woolf 1988: 158) of the text that Woolf loves in Sir Thomas Browne's writings and that she analyses in her essay "Reading". The military metaphor of resistance might suggest that once the fortress of the text has been assaulted, it will surrender to the reader. However, the author makes it clear that such is not the case.
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Paul Auster: A General Introduction par Jocelyn Dupont, publié le 13/02/2009
This document provides a short general overview of Paul Auster’s work. After a brief discussion of Auster’s texts positioning in the literary heritage, it tackles the place and role of the writer in an often alienating environment. It then deals with the representation of the city in Auster’s work, notably Brooklyn, before concluding on the gift for storytelling that so characterizes Paul Auster’s production.
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Fiche de lecture : The Good Life, Jay McInerney par Armelle Calonne, publié le 07/05/2008
The Good Life is a story about many things: it deals with love and loss, with life and death, with contradictory feelings that, in the end, are all but one.
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Fiche de lecture : Arthur and George, Julian Barnes par Thibaud Harrois, publié le 07/05/2008
The novel is based on an actual story, known as the "Great Wyrley Outrages". At the end of the 19th century, George Edalji, a solicitor from Great Wyrley, a village near Birmingham, was wrongly found guilty of slaying a number of farm animals. He was sentenced to seven years in jail. In 1906, Edalji was released but he was not pardoned. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the famous author of the Sherlock Holmes stories, was involved in the case. Indeed, he tried to prove the man's innocence and was at the source of what was considered as an English Dreyfus Case.
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Fiche de lecture : Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, Jonathan Safran Foer par Alice Bonzom, publié le 07/05/2008
The novel narrates the story of Oskar Schell, a precocious nine-year-old inventor, pacifist, percussionist, and Francophile, whose father died during the attacks of 9/11. A couple of years after his father’s death, he finds a mysterious key in an envelope with the name “Black” on it, in a vase in a closet. Sure that the key belonged to his father, he decides to visit everyone named “Black” in the five boroughs of New York to discover what it opens. Intertwined with Oskar’s quest are letters written by his grandparents, who went through the bombings of Dresden in the Second World War.
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Fiche de lecture : The Bear Boy, Cynthia Ozick par Anne Musset, publié le 07/05/2008
The story is set in the outskirts of the Bronx in 1935. Rose Meadows, orphaned at the age of 18, becomes an assistant to Professor Mitwisser, a specialist of a 9th-century heretic Jewish sect. Professor Mitwisser, his wife (a renowned physicist but now a near-madwoman) and their five children are German refugees who survive thanks to their young benefactor James A’Bair. James is heir to the fortune amassed by his father, who took him as a model for a very popular series of children’s books called The Bear Boy. James is extremely wealthy but troubled, dispossessed of his identity. He leads a nomadic life and his latest whim is to support the Mitwisser family. Rose enters into this chaotic household, which becomes even more unstable with the arrival of James. Very soon this little precarious world verges on disaster.
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Across the ‘Wide Sargasso Sea’: Jean Rhys’s Revision of Charlotte Brontë’s Eurocentric Gothic par Sylvie Maurel, publié le 20/03/2008
In this article, Sylvie Maurel analyses the Gothic destabilizing machinery at work in Jean Rhys’s "Wide Sargasso Sea". The first Gothic element the author looks at is the demonic agency that haunts the novel. Colonial history lingers in Rhys’s world and accounts for some of the strange and unexpected phenomena that occur on the island. Actually, the narrative is under the double influence of a past set in an actual history of slavery and a future already written in the story of "Jane Eyre". Rhys’s characters have an uncanny prescience of what lies ahead and a sense that they cannot evade repetition. The motif of witchcraft is another element that links "WSS" to the Gothic. The motif goes beyond a picturesque reference to the West Indian context and functions as a metaphor of the relationship between language and power. Christophine’s witchcraft and Rochester’s Eurocentric discourse are two similar attempts at transforming the world through language. The power of language is also reflected in the way the novel constantly brings together multiple voices and conflicting views which seem to hide a secret rather than reveal a final truth. Rochester can only feel the presence of such a secret and risks delirium as he tries to get a grip on something that constantly eludes him.
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