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Helen Oyeyemi reading from White is for Witching - Assises Internationales du Roman 2012 par Helen Oyeyemi, Patricia Armion, publié le 08/06/2012
Helen Oyeyemi took part in the sixth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She was kind enough to read an extract from White is for Witching, her stunning Neo-Gothic novel.
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The “obstinate resistance” of Woolf’s short stories par Christine Reynier, publié le 31/03/2009
I have often wondered why, although I have regularly gone back to Virginia Woolf's short stories, I still feel I do not know them very well. This is of course no other than the secret charm of Woolf's short stories: they are so hermetic or puzzling that one cannot help re-reading them; they are so varied that one keeps forgetting them; they are so challenging that one feels bound to delve into them again and again. They offer the "obstinate resistance" (Woolf 1988: 158) of the text that Woolf loves in Sir Thomas Browne's writings and that she analyses in her essay "Reading". The military metaphor of resistance might suggest that once the fortress of the text has been assaulted, it will surrender to the reader. However, the author makes it clear that such is not the case.
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David Treuer: Forgotten World / Forgotten Words par David Treuer, publié le 18/09/2014
We speak confidently and playfully about the “death of the author” but not one wants to seriously consider the death of literature. But this is precisely what we risk when we treat literature as ethnography, or worse, as the last living remnants of what seem to be vanishing cultures. We don’t read novels, at any rate, to educate ourselves. Or if we do we shouldn’t. And if we do commit this soul error we don’t enjoy novels because of the information they contain. Rather, we enjoy them, we clutch novels to our very souls because they move us, surprise us, transport us, entertain us, shock us, and (ultimately) trick us into caring about people and places that don’t exist and never existed.
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"I’m the antidote to propaganda": A conversation with Martin Parr par Martin Parr, Marie Gautier, Aurore Fossard, publié le 21/09/2012
"Well I like bright colours. I took the palette that was used for commercial photography, especially in advertising and fashion, and I applied that to the art world because I’m fundamentally trying to create entertainment in my photographs. The idea is to make them bright and colourful but if you want to read a more serious message in the photographs then you can do it as well. But my prime aim is to make accessible entertainment for ‘the masses’. So it’s a serious message disguised as entertainment."
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Marilynne Robinson - Assises Internationales du Roman 2010 par Marilynne Robinson , Kédem Ferré , publié le 14/06/2010
Marilynne Robinson was invited to the fourth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She was interviewed for La Clé des langues and read an extract from Gilead, a novel which was awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize.
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Anne Enright - Assises Internationales du Roman 2010 par Anne Enright , Clifford Armion , publié le 10/06/2010
Anne Enright came to Lyon in May 2010 to take part in the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She was kind enough to answer our questions and to read an extract from her novel entitled The Gathering which won the 2007 Booker Prize.
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A.S. Byatt - Assises Internationales du Roman 2010 par A.S. Byatt , Emilie Walezac , publié le 10/06/2010
In May 2010, Antonia Susan Byatt took part in the fourth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She granted us an interview and was kind enough to read a passage form The Children's Book, her latest novel.
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The "mechanics of reality": Paul Auster speaks about his work and inspiration par Paul Auster, Jocelyn Dupont, publié le 15/01/2009
A l'occasion du passage de Paul Auster à Lyon, la Villa Gillet a organisé une rencontre entre l'auteur des Brooklyn Follies et plusieurs centaines de lycéens étudiant cette oeuvre pour leur bac d'anglais. La première partie de l'entretien a été menée par Jocelyn Dupont, puis, dans la seconde partie, les lycéens ont pu poser eux-mêmes leurs questions à Paul Auster.
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Translation as Muse: Muse as Teacher par Mary Jo Bang, publié le 15/11/2013
how can reading not add to one’s experience, and in turn influence a person’s writing? And wouldn’t translation especially affect the brain, since translation involves the closest sort of reading, one where the mind simultaneously reads for meaning and tries to access the equivalent word or expression in another language. Wouldn’t reading the word “pelle” in Italian similarly send a message to the brain to access the synaptic record of all past sensory experience having to do with leather: black jacket, kid gloves, car seat, red belt with an alligator buckle, toy-gun holster, shoe shop. Wouldn’t the experiential knowledge of how those various leathers felt be carried along as the translator toggled between two different linguistic systems? And of course each of those leather memories would be connected to other associational memories, some quite rich in subjectivity.
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A reading of The Brooklyn Follies through the lens of autofiction par Marie Thévenon, publié le 02/10/2009
From his very first novel, The Invention of Solitude, to his very last, Man in the Dark, Paul Auster has always played with the mixture between autobiography and fiction. The Brooklyn Follies pertains to this tradition and it is through the lens of autofiction that this article proposes to explore this novel. The author starts by observing the similarities between Paul Auster and his characters and pays close attention to the intertextual dimension. She then analyses the metafictional aspects of the narration. Finally, she places this novel among Paul Auster's other works and wonders if there has been an evolution in his writing.
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Obscurity and Dylan Thomas’s early poetry par Iris Yaron-Leconte , publié le 07/10/2010
This article presents an analysis of Dylan Thomas’s early poem “When once the twilight locks no longer”, ignored by scholars, probably because of its extreme obscurity. The analysis is preceded by a theoretical discussion of obscurity in poetry and offers a definition of the term “obscure poem”. I argue that in reading an obscure poem significant changes are generated in the dynamics of text processing. In transgressing the rules of communication, Thomas’s poem raises the question as to how the reader is to decode it.
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