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Novel/Life (James Meek) par James Meek, publié le 13/06/2014
Chaque année, les invités des Assises Internationales du Roman rédigent la définition d'un mot de leur choix : il s'agit ici des mots "novel/life", définis par l'auteur anglais James Meek.
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The Victorian Sensation Novel par Sophie Lemercier-Goddard, David Amigoni, publié le 02/05/2008
The sensation novel developed in Britain in the 1860s with Wilkie Collins as its most famous representative and has been increasingly presented as a sub-genre revealing the cultural anxiety of the Victorian period. Its complex narrative which relies on a tangle of mysteries and secrets introduces the character of the detective while heavily resorting to the Gothic machinery with the figure of the persecuted maiden and that of the villain.
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"The novel gives voice to individuals" : Entretien avec Jane Smiley par Jane Smiley, Jillian Bruns, publié le 09/10/2018
À l'occasion des Assises Internationales du Roman, Jane Smiley, lauréate du Prix Pulitzer 1992 pour son roman L'exploitation, a accepté de répondre aux questions de Jillian Bruns, lectrice à l'ENS de Lyon, pour la Clé des langues. Jane Smiley revient ici sur la genèse des trois romans qui constituent la trilogie The Last Hundred Years.
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Jonathan Dee on the place of the novel in a money-driven society par Jonathan Dee, publié le 13/06/2012
About money there is nothing new. Nor about social inequity. When I wrote The Privileges, I was careful to leave out as many time-specific details as possible, because I felt that to tie its characters, and the lives they led, to the circumstances of a particular moment in history was to excuse them, in a way, and thus to miss the point of their existence...
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A reading of The Brooklyn Follies through the lens of autofiction par Marie Thévenon, publié le 02/10/2009
From his very first novel, The Invention of Solitude, to his very last, Man in the Dark, Paul Auster has always played with the mixture between autobiography and fiction. The Brooklyn Follies pertains to this tradition and it is through the lens of autofiction that this article proposes to explore this novel. The author starts by observing the similarities between Paul Auster and his characters and pays close attention to the intertextual dimension. She then analyses the metafictional aspects of the narration. Finally, she places this novel among Paul Auster's other works and wonders if there has been an evolution in his writing.
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The Yellow Birds - A conversation with Kevin Powers par Kevin Powers, Clifford Armion, publié le 30/06/2014
Kevin Powers took part in the eighth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. He answered our questions on his first novel, The Yellow Birds.
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The Last Hundred Days - A conversation with Patrick MacGuinness par Patrick MacGuinness, Clifford Armion, publié le 24/06/2014
Patrick MacGuinness took part in the eighth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. He answered our questions on his first novel, The Last Hundred Days.
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An interview with Douglas Kennedy - Assises Internationales du Roman 2012 par Douglas Kennedy, Clifford Armion, publié le 04/06/2012
In June 2012, Douglas Kennedy took part in the sixth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. He answered our questions on his latest novel, The Moment.
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An interview with Jonathan Coe (Expo 58) par Jonathan Coe, Clifford Armion, publié le 18/02/2014
Jonathan Coe was born in Birmingham in 1961. His novels include The Rotters' Club, The Accidental Woman, A Touch of Love, The Dwarves of Death, What a Carve Up!, which won the 1995 John Llewellyn Rhys Prize and the French Prix du Meilleur Livre Étranger and The Rain Before it Falls. His latest novel is Expo 58.
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Interview de Richard Russo - Assises Internationales du Roman 2011 par Richard Russo , Clifford Armion , publié le 30/08/2011
Richard Russo won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize with his novel Empire Falls. In May 2011, he took part in the fifth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. He was kind enough to grant us an interview at the Hotel Carlton in Lyon.
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James Frey - Assises Internationales du Roman 2010 par James Frey, publié le 03/09/2010
James Frey was one of the guests of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde in Lyon. He introduced his novel Bright Shiny Morning and told the audience about his perception of Los Angeles and his conception of storytelling.
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Marilynne Robinson - Assises Internationales du Roman 2010 par Marilynne Robinson , Kédem Ferré , publié le 14/06/2010
Marilynne Robinson was invited to the fourth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She was interviewed for La Clé des langues and read an extract from Gilead, a novel which was awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize.
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A.S. Byatt - Assises Internationales du Roman 2010 par A.S. Byatt , Emilie Walezac , publié le 10/06/2010
In May 2010, Antonia Susan Byatt took part in the fourth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She granted us an interview and was kind enough to read a passage form The Children's Book, her latest novel.
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Anne Enright - Assises Internationales du Roman 2010 par Anne Enright , Clifford Armion , publié le 10/06/2010
Anne Enright came to Lyon in May 2010 to take part in the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She was kind enough to answer our questions and to read an extract from her novel entitled The Gathering which won the 2007 Booker Prize.
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Kirsty Gunn: Sound and Writing par Kirsty Gunn, publié le 08/09/2014
That sound you hear, as though coming off the lonely Scottish hills, through the fine Highland air, passing across straths and glens, along rivers and to the sea... Is the sound of the piobaireachd, the classical music of the great Highland bagpipe, a music made for Gatherings, Salutes and Laments, a grand and grave and complicated music - Ceol Mor it is in Gaelic - The Big Music. The Big Music, too, is the title of my latest work of fiction - not a novel, but an elegy, as Virginia Woolf described all her work - a story that sounds as much as it says... An experience of words, of a story of people and a landscape, of a love story played across generations, that nevertheless sounds in the mind...
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"Language is power" : Entretien avec Claire Messud par Claire Messud, Jillian Bruns, publié le 25/09/2018
À l'occasion des Assises Internationales du Roman, organisées par la Villa Gillet, la Clé des langues a pu rencontrer Claire Messud, romancière et enseignante américaine, auteure de The Burning Girl, paru en 2017. Dans cet entretien, elle nous livre ses réflexions sur l'importance de la langue et du roman en tant que genre littéraire, et revient sur son enfance partagée entre la France et les États-Unis.
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Nickolas Butler: On Rural America par Nickolas Butler, publié le 15/09/2015
Until about a year ago, I had lived my whole life in urban areas. The smallest cities I had ever called home was likely during graduate school, when I commuted between Arden Hills, Minnesota (population: 9,704) and Iowa City, Iowa (population: 67,862). And in fairness to Arden Hills and Iowa City, both communities are much larger than their census estimates, due in part to their proximity to other larger growing cities, and their migrating student populations. The largest city I had ever called home was Chicago, where I once lived for a year during college, in a small room so close to the elevated train tracks I could have thrown a baseball and hit the passing EL.
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Big Brother - A conversation with Lionel Shriver par Lionel Shriver, Clifford Armion, publié le 30/06/2015
The author of numerous novels, she won the Orange Prize for We Need to Talk About Kevin, adapted for the screen in 2011 by Lynne Ramsay. Her sarcastic flair is evident in Big Brother: Pandora, a highly successful businesswoman who hasn’t seen her brother—a seductive, boastful, jazz prodigy—in five years finds him obese, neglected, and compulsive. Lionel Shriver provides a keen analysis of our neurotic relationship with food and the alarming increase in obesity in our societies.
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David Treuer: Forgotten World / Forgotten Words par David Treuer, publié le 18/09/2014
We speak confidently and playfully about the “death of the author” but not one wants to seriously consider the death of literature. But this is precisely what we risk when we treat literature as ethnography, or worse, as the last living remnants of what seem to be vanishing cultures. We don’t read novels, at any rate, to educate ourselves. Or if we do we shouldn’t. And if we do commit this soul error we don’t enjoy novels because of the information they contain. Rather, we enjoy them, we clutch novels to our very souls because they move us, surprise us, transport us, entertain us, shock us, and (ultimately) trick us into caring about people and places that don’t exist and never existed.
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Rachel Cusk: Love narratives par Rachel Cusk, publié le 28/08/2014
If it’s true that we use narrative as a frame to make sense of the randomness of our human experience, then the story of romantic love might be seen as reflecting our profoundest anxieties about who and what we are, about what happens to us and why. The love narrative is ostensibly a story of progress, yet its true goal is to achieve an ending, a place of finality where nothing further needs to happen and the tension between fantasy and reality can cease. At the wedding of man and woman a veil is drawn, an ending arrived at: the reader closes the book, for marriage as it is lived represents the re-assertion of reality over narrative. Having committed this public act of participation and belief in the notion of life as a story, man and woman are left to order and confer meaning on their private experiences as best they can...
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RJ Ellory on crime stories par Roger Jon Ellory, publié le 21/06/2012
Who judges the crime? Is the severity of the crime, even the crime itself, judged by the perpetrator or the victim? If judged by the perpetrator, would the punishment be more or less severe, for are we not our own worst enemies, our own most damning judge?
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Nicholson Baker on his literary career and how he came to write about sex par Nicholson Baker, publié le 13/06/2012
I think the job of the novelist is to write about interesting things, including things that might not seem all that interesting at first glance--like, say, a lunch hour on an ordinary weekday – and to offer evidence that life is worth living. At least, that’s what I try to do – not always successfully. My first book was about a lunch hour – the second about sitting in a rocking chair holding a baby – the third about literary ambition. There was almost no sex in those three books. But I always wanted to be a pornographer – because after all sex is amazing and irrational and embarrassing and endlessly worth thinking about. My fourth book was called Vox, and it was about two strangers telling stories to each other on the phone. I decided to write it as one big sex scene, because if you’re going to do it, do it.
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An interview with Nick Flynn - Assises Internationales du Roman 2012 par Nick Flynn, Julia Arnous, publié le 05/06/2012
Nick Flynn took part in the sixth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. He answered our questions on Another Bullshit Night in Suck City and his approach to non-fiction.
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The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 14/09/2010
Cette propose des ressources sur le roman The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society de Mary Ann Shaffer et Annie Barrows. Les textes sont reproduits avec l'aimable autorisation de Random House, Inc.
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An interview with Beverley Naidoo par Beverley Naidoo, Clifford Armion, publié le 01/06/2010
Un entretien accordé à La Clé des langues par Beverley Naidoo suite à son déplacement dans l'académie de Rouen.
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La naissance du roman en Angleterre au XVIIIe siècle par Anne Dromart, publié le 14/02/2008
Après la grande époque de la poésie, la prose revient au goût du jour vers la fin du XVIIe siècle en Angleterre pour progressivement s'épanouir en une forme nouvelle au cours du XVIIIe siècle. Les "novels" qui apparaissent sous les plumes de Defoe, Richardson, Fielding et Sterne se démarquent des "romances" qui les avaient précédées et se caractérisent par une attention portée à la vraisemblance des faits narrés.
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Helen Oyeyemi reading from White is for Witching - Assises Internationales du Roman 2012 par Helen Oyeyemi, Patricia Armion, publié le 08/06/2012
Helen Oyeyemi took part in the sixth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She was kind enough to read an extract from White is for Witching, her stunning Neo-Gothic novel.
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An interview with Helen Oyeyemi - Assises Internationales du Roman 2012 par Helen Oyeyemi, Patricia Armion, publié le 06/06/2012
Helen Oyeyemi took part in the sixth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She answered our questions on White is for Witching, a stunning Neo-Gothic novel.
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Kate Colquhoun on the blurred boundaries between fiction and non-fiction par Kate Colquhoun, publié le 11/09/2012
Truman Capote called his 1966 book In Cold Blood the first non-fiction novel. Since then, the boundaries between fiction and non-fiction have become increasingly blurred. Are these false definitions? At least we could say that novelists are able to articulate the internal worlds – the thoughts and feelings – of their characters while non-fiction relies entirely on evidence.
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Helen Oyeyemi, White is for Witching par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 27/08/2012
Helen Olajumoke Oyeyemi (born 10 December 1984) is a British novelist. Oyeyemi wrote her first novel, The Icarus Girl, while still at school studying for her A levels at Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School. Whilst studying Social and Political Sciences at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, two of her plays, Juniper's Whitening and Victimese, were performed by fellow students to critical acclaim and subsequently published by Methuen.
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Rebelling as a female in the 18th and 19th century literature. From Pamela to Jane Eyre: a path to equality? par Marion Lopez-Burette, publié le 23/09/2013
This article intends to study and compare the way Pamela, Richardson's early heroine of the novel genre, and Charlotte Brontë's romantic Jane, rebel. What follows will underscore the path trodden by female fictional characters in terms of shaping the individual, from the Enlightenment period to the romantic era. The patterns of entrapment and self-willed seclusion the protagonists are involved in function as incentives for rebellion. The ideals they rebel for play the role of living forces in a way that is meaningful to comprehend how the essence of rebellion evolved with time. No matter how much the protagonists' respective procedure may differ, from moral conservatism to personal answering of moral questions through rites of passage, the two female heroines are equally conscious of their value as human beings. Their handling of their hardships and their allegiance to God, however, points to the qualitative and quantitative evolution of the notion of equality.
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David Vann: Secret and subtext par David Vann, publié le 07/10/2013
All of the conventions of literary fiction can be successfully broken except one: there must be subtext, a second story beneath the surface. We don’t have to care about a protagonist or even really have a protagonist. We’re not limited to any particular style or structure. But our entire idea of literature being “about” something is based on a second narrative, something else that the surface narrative can point to. What’s interesting to me about this is that we live in a time when surface narratives are taking over. Blogs are generally so worthless for this one reason, that they lack subtext. The online world is, above all, earnest, saying exactly what it means.
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Hugo Hamilton on memory and fiction par Hugo Hamilton, publié le 24/06/2013
It’s a stormy night in Dublin. My father comes into the bedroom to close the window. But the old sash window is rotten. As he tries pull it down, the wooden frame comes apart in his hands like a piece of fruit cake. The glass is smashed. So my father has to find a way to cover over the gaps. He looks around and picks up the nearest thing at hand. In the corner of the room there is a map of the world, a big rolled up school atlas which he’s kept from the time he was a schoolteacher. He rolls it out and nails the atlas up against the window frame. It’s a temporary solution, he says. Go to sleep. So that’s how I fall asleep, with the wind blowing across the world, flapping at the oceans and the continents. The world is there in the morning with the sun coming through.
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The Speckled People - a conversation with Hugo Hamilton par Hugo Hamilton, Kouadio N'Duessan, publié le 10/06/2013
Somebody mentioned the word confusion. That is probably the word that describes my childhood most clearly. It was a confusion of languages, confusion between the inside of the house and the outside of the house, confusion between my father’s idealism and my mother’s memories. There’s always been confusion in my life.
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The Intensive Care Unit: A Place of Technology and Myth par Cécile Guilbert, publié le 22/01/2013
If we follow Giorgio Agamben, who defined “religion as that which subtracts things, places, animals and persons from common use to transfer them into a separate sphere,” the intensive care unit seems to be a sacred place within the hospital because it is special, separate, and governed by specific protocols, whether we’re talking about reduced visiting hours or its bunker-like nature (like the operating room and the morgue). And because it’s the place of suspension between life and death, a passageway between the conscious and the unconscious, or between presence and absence, intensive care is the place for all sorts of metaphysical questions, in the form of oxymora. What’s at stake here, for the patient—a dying life? A living death? What then is life? and death?
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Some Thoughts on Identity par Claude Arnaud, publié le 18/01/2013
It is the topic par excellence, the enigma that is impossible to solve. This puppet that we call somewhat pompously “The Self,” what is it in the end? An actor who resigns himself, around the age of thirty, to play only one role, or a born clown who struggles to understand himself, having changed so often?
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Becoming No One par Gwenaëlle Aubry, publié le 15/01/2013
"The writing project came as the answer to a question that can, in retrospect, be formulated as follows: How can we grieve for a melancholy person, a person who was grieving himself? How can we get to grips with the absence of someone who was never really present?"
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For another Hysterature par Emilie Notéris, publié le 17/12/2012
Since the question of women’s freedom in writing, or “Why stories of transgression or women’s assertions of freedom are less tolerated than those of men?” only highlight ordinary male chauvinism (the answer to the question is undeniably related to cultural issues), I prefer to focus on the counter strategies that can be deployed in response to the insults made to women, like the one Eileen Myles describes in her introduction to I love Dick by Chris Kraus, What about Chris?: “She’s turned female abjection inside out and aimed it at a man.” In other words, rather than identifying the reasons for the violent reception of women’s transgressive writing, I prefer to think about the strategies that can flow from them.
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Not Looking for Love par Chris Kraus, publié le 17/12/2012
As women, we are often identified through our choice of sexual partners. When an “attractive” woman has sex with an ugly man, it is a descent into “abjection.” But why? Clearly, it is because as women, we are still believed to attain most of our identities through sexuality. In the present assimilationist climate, any non-monogamous, non-relational sexual act is read as a symptom of emotional damage. Our culture persists in believing that sex holds the magic key to a person’s identity — which is, of course, wrong — and in behaving as if female writers are uniquely charged with upholding the sacred intimacy of the sexual act.
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The Words of the Flesh par Wendy Delorme, publié le 11/12/2012
There are people who write from the place that they have been assigned. Some of them with rage so as to get away from it; others, by contrast, who follow the path that has been mapped out for us. There are those who would rather stay on the margin of that space, away from the feminine, off-centered, but are then dragged back to it, kicking and screaming. Their words are women's words, words that are situated. The masculine remains the universal reference. Feminine words stay in the realm of the singular, indexed to the gender of who said them.
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Declaration of Disinclinations par Lynne Tillman, publié le 11/12/2012
I like the theoretical ideal of neutrality, of non-hierarchical thinking. I’d like to be a writer, a person, but I am not. None of this naming is my choice. I’m a woman, “still” or I’m “only a woman.” “A good, bad woman, a silly, frivolous woman, an intelligent woman, a sweet woman, a harridan, bitch, whore, a fishmonger, gossipy woman. A woman writer.” What is “a woman writer”? Does “woman” cancel or negate “writer”? Create a different form of writer? Or does “woman” as an adjective utterly change the noun “writer”? “Man writer”? Not used. “Male writer,” rarely employed. Are there “man books” being read in “man caves?” OK, I declare: I’m a woman who writes, a person who writes. But how am I read?
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Frederick Wiseman on Reality and film par Frederick Wiseman, publié le 03/09/2012
The provocative starting point sent to me for this debate states that "Artists and writers are vampires who feed on reality." I do not think this is any more true of artists and writers than it is of anybody whether they be doctor, lawyer, used car salesman, fishmonger, politician, farmer, priest, housewife or any of the other hundreds of thousands of jobs that exist.
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Nick Flynn on the misfit and the outcast par Nick Flynn, publié le 27/08/2012
I wrote a memoir a few years ago (Another Bullshit Night in Suck City), which, in part, chronicled the five or six years my father spent living on the streets in Boston. I’d been a case-worker with the homeless for three years before he got himself evicted from his marginal living situation, ran out of options (he slept in his taxi, on friend’s couches) and eventually ended up at the shelter where I worked. I hadn’t grown up with him, I hadn’t met him, really, before he came into the shelter—that this is where I got to know him is in the Shakespearian realm of the unlikely coincidence that sets the play in motion (think Hamlet encountering his father’s ghost).
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Helen Oyeyemi on haunted house novels par Helen Oyeyemi, publié le 18/06/2012
"You read of extreme cases of jamais vu in the newspapers. There was one recently involving a husband who, after eighteen years of happy stability with his wife, told her he had a surprise for her. He blindfolded her, then ‘hit her over the head with the blunt end of an axe, fracturing her skull in three places.’ She survived and tried to forgive him, even vouched for his good character in court. The husband-turned-attacker, unable to explain his moment of terminal hostility, deferred to psychiatrists who offered the opinion that it was his past that had caused it. "
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Helen Oyeyemi and the students of the Lycée Parc Chabrières par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 08/06/2012
As part of the Assises Internationales du Roman, Helen Oyeyemi went to the Lycée Parc Chabrière to meet the students of Emilie Michaux and Isabelle Bowley who had studied White is for Witching in class.
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Littérature et société aux Etats-Unis : 1917-1968 par Alice Béja , publié le 27/11/2008
Cet article propose un regard sur la littérature américaine du 20e siècle dans son rapport à l'idée d'Amérique. Les guerres et crises que traversent les Etats-Unis au cours de la période 1917-1968 contribuent à une dégradation de l'"American Dream" en "American way of life" à laquelle les écrivains américains réagissent en recherchant de nouvelles origines pour construire, en fin de compte, leur propre idée d'Amérique.
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Web culture : nouveaux modes de connaissance, nouvelles sociabilités par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 21/02/2011
« The experience of Facebook to me is not another experience of social life, it's an experience of fantasy, of character creation, a kind of novel writing where you cast the characters, you choose a face for yourself, you curate photographs that tell stories about yourself. I bring to it the same enthusiasm that I would bring to reading or writing a novel... »
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Ragnarok - A conversation with A.S. Byatt par A.S. Byatt, Clifford Armion, publié le 03/06/2013
A.S. Byatt took part in the seventh edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She answered our questions on her latest novel, Ragnarok.
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Adelle Waldman: L’identité troublée par Adelle Waldman, publié le 15/09/2015
In reporter and columnist Adelle Waldman’s first, highly touted novel, La Vie amoureuse de Nathaniel P., the author describes with subtlety and irony the meanderings of Nate Piven, a popular writer moving up in the elite literary circles of Brooklyn. He is also a young lover drunk with his success with women. In this astute novel of manners, Waldman brilliantly paints the portrait of a modern, imperfect and narcissistic male with a troubled love life.
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Seeing Between the Lines: Terence Davies’s The House of Mirth and the art of adaptation par Wendy Everett, publié le 02/03/2015
Examining Terence Davies’s adaptation of Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth, this article identifies ways in which the creative interpretation of the filmmaker may serve to open up new insights into both the original text and the language of cinema itself. It considers, in particular, aspects such as music, painting, and visual metaphor in its presentation of cinema as an essentially multilayered and complex medium which requires of the spectator an imaginative and creative engagement, just as the novel requires of the reader.
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Breaking Bounds in Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things par Catherine Pesso-Miquel, publié le 13/05/2011
This article on Arundhati Roy's novel focuses more particularly on the idea of dividing lines, turned into parodied, ridiculous devices, and on their transgression. Analysing in particular the love scenes between the two lovers and the incest scene between the two twins, it attempts to define the differences rather than the similarities between such scenes, asking the question: is transgression necessarily linked with progression? The article will show that Roy, like other Indo-Anglian novelists such as Salman Rushdie, goes to war with the sacrosanct notion of purity, celebrating instead mixing, hybridizing, and the blurring of boundaries.
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Fiche de lecture : Arthur and George, Julian Barnes par Thibaud Harrois, publié le 07/05/2008
The novel is based on an actual story, known as the "Great Wyrley Outrages". At the end of the 19th century, George Edalji, a solicitor from Great Wyrley, a village near Birmingham, was wrongly found guilty of slaying a number of farm animals. He was sentenced to seven years in jail. In 1906, Edalji was released but he was not pardoned. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the famous author of the Sherlock Holmes stories, was involved in the case. Indeed, he tried to prove the man's innocence and was at the source of what was considered as an English Dreyfus Case.
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Across the ‘Wide Sargasso Sea’: Jean Rhys’s Revision of Charlotte Brontë’s Eurocentric Gothic par Sylvie Maurel, publié le 20/03/2008
In this article, Sylvie Maurel analyses the Gothic destabilizing machinery at work in Jean Rhys’s "Wide Sargasso Sea". The first Gothic element the author looks at is the demonic agency that haunts the novel. Colonial history lingers in Rhys’s world and accounts for some of the strange and unexpected phenomena that occur on the island. Actually, the narrative is under the double influence of a past set in an actual history of slavery and a future already written in the story of "Jane Eyre". Rhys’s characters have an uncanny prescience of what lies ahead and a sense that they cannot evade repetition. The motif of witchcraft is another element that links "WSS" to the Gothic. The motif goes beyond a picturesque reference to the West Indian context and functions as a metaphor of the relationship between language and power. Christophine’s witchcraft and Rochester’s Eurocentric discourse are two similar attempts at transforming the world through language. The power of language is also reflected in the way the novel constantly brings together multiple voices and conflicting views which seem to hide a secret rather than reveal a final truth. Rochester can only feel the presence of such a secret and risks delirium as he tries to get a grip on something that constantly eludes him.
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Fiche de lecture : Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, Jonathan Safran Foer par Alice Bonzom, publié le 07/05/2008
The novel narrates the story of Oskar Schell, a precocious nine-year-old inventor, pacifist, percussionist, and Francophile, whose father died during the attacks of 9/11. A couple of years after his father’s death, he finds a mysterious key in an envelope with the name “Black” on it, in a vase in a closet. Sure that the key belonged to his father, he decides to visit everyone named “Black” in the five boroughs of New York to discover what it opens. Intertwined with Oskar’s quest are letters written by his grandparents, who went through the bombings of Dresden in the Second World War.
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Fiche de lecture : On Beauty, Zadie Smith par Claire Poinsot, publié le 07/05/2008
The Belseys have always claimed to be liberal and atheist, but when their eldest son Jerome goes to work as an intern in England with his father Howard’s enemy the, ultra-conservative Christian Monty Kipps, there are bound to be a few mishaps. When Jerome finally returns home, the Kipps in turn move to Wellington, the town where the Belseys live. Working at the same university, Howard and Monty develop a rivalry, while their wives become friends. The novel hinges on the mirror effects and the interactions between the two families. Their relationship is a complex one which includes friendship, rivalry, lust and envy. Each family will have problems to solve, both personal and professional.
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From traditional dystopias to teenage dystopias: Harry Potter as a bridge between two cultures par Eléonore Cartellier-Veuillen, publié le 25/04/2016
“From traditional dystopias to teenage dystopias: Harry Potter as a bridge between two cultures” seeks to explain the key role that the Harry Potter novels have played in the creation of the Young Adult dystopian genre which has flourished in recent years. It focuses on three aspects of dystopia (mind-control, death and resistance) to show how these themes taken from traditional dystopias are re-written to shape such contemporary works as Uglies, The Hunger Games and Divergent.
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What Is Translation For? par Keith Gessen, publié le 19/11/2013
What is the place of the writer in the literary field of the home country? What contribution can this writer make to the literary field of the target or host country? It's important to understand that the answers to these questions will often be different: a writer can be a marginal figure in his home country and become a vital figure in another country. More often, of course, the reverse is true.
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Kate O'Riordan: Visions of Ireland - A writer's view par Kate O'Riordan, publié le 17/09/2013
A Londoner by adoption, Kate O’Riordan grew up in the small city of Bantry on the west coast of Ireland. With Le Garçon dans la lune, published in 2008 and Pierres de mémoire, in 2009, O’Riordan signed two new remarkable opuses in which she questions family relationships. A novelist and short-story writer, Kate O’Riordan also writes for the cinema and continues to confirm her legitimate place among Irish authors who count. She came to the Villa Gillet to take part in a discussion on 'Ireland by Irish writers'.
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Keith Scribner: Representation and Psychology of Conflict par Keith Scribner, publié le 27/08/2013
In his Nobel Prize acceptance speech William Faulkner famously said that all real meaning in fiction comes from the human heart in conflict with itself. As a novelist I’m compelled by the internal conflicts inherent in the stories we tell ourselves in order to live and how those stories come to define us, how they allow us to justify our actions and possibly delude ourselves about who we are. Like any narrative, these stories help us shape otherwise disparate experiences into a comprehensible form. Over time we become so heavily invested in these narratives that when their veracity is challenged, the resulting conflict can be explosive.
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How Healing Are Books? par Pierre Zaoui, publié le 22/01/2013
The idea that novels, theater, or poetry often help us live, that they help us feel cleansed or feel stronger, more energized, more alive, or that they at least help us survive by giving us the boost we need to hang on a little longer, is not simply a constant topos of literature, be it western, eastern, or universal. It is an indisputable truth for those who make use of it, whether they write it, read it, comment on it, or transform it into a first-aid kid of maxim-prescriptions and citation-medicines to use as needed.
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The Neurosciences and Literature: an “exquisite corpse” or a “meeting of the minds”? par Lionel Naccache, publié le 16/02/2012
In the context of the Walls and Bridges project in New York, a meeting has been organized for October between an American novelist - Siri Hustvedt - and a French neuroscientist on the topic of "fiction," both mental and literary. This will obviously be the time to ask ourselves: can we imagine a promising future for meetings between the neurosciences of cognition and the world of literary creation? Is this merely the random juxtaposition of two terms to which we are attached, or the genuine dialectical culmination of self-consciousness? An amusing, trendy quid pro quo, or a key moment in our knowledge of ourselves as tale tellers?
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Conscious and Unconscious Narrative Literature, Psychoanalysis and Neuroscience par Siri Hustvedt, Lionel Naccache, publié le 20/01/2012
Nous passons une grande partie de notre vie à élaborer des fictions, à nous raconter des histoires et à en raconter aux autres. La narration est profondément enracinée dans l'esprit humain, à un niveau à la fois conscient et inconscient. Produire une narration est une façon de donner du sens à l'expérience factuelle. Mais les fictions créées par le cerveau humain et celles que les romanciers imaginent sont-elles de même nature ? L'écrivain américain Siri Hustvedt et le neurobiologiste français Lionel Naccache exprimeront leurs points de vue originaux, pénétrants et empathiques sur cette question. We all spend our time constructing fictions, telling stories to ourselves and to others. Narration is deeply rooted in the human mind, at a conscious and unconscious level. Producing a narrative is a way of giving meaning to factual experience. Are the fictions created by the human brain and those imagined by novelists of the same nature? American writer Siri Hustvedt and French neurobiologist Lionel Naccache express their original, incisive and empathetic views on these questions.
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Katherine Mansfield’s Short Stories: An Introduction par Emilie Walezak , publié le 28/06/2011
Katherine Mansfield wrote short stories exclusively and produced a large body of work though she died quite young from tuberculosis when she was 30. She is one the best representatives of modernist short story writing. Virginia Woolf herself admitted to Mansfield that she was jealous of her writing: "and then Morgan Foster said the Prelude and The Voyage Out were the best novels of their time, and I said damn Katherine! Why can't I be the only woman who knows how to write?"
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The modern child and Romantic monstrosity in Doris Lessing’s The Fifth Child par Camille François , publié le 17/05/2011
This study investigates the articulation between "child" and "monster" in Lessing's novella, linking the text to a tradition of contemporary fiction about the child in which the much beloved literary figure inherited from the Romantics has become a frightening other. We hope to understand the Fifth Child 's shifting boundaries between the monstrous and the ideal, the "real child" and childhood as a locus of adult desires, by tracing these dichotomies back to Romantic myths of childhood, or the distorted versions that have made it to our time.
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Proche de l'indigestion intertextuelle : "Des Hottentotes" de Paul Di Filippo par Jérôme Dutel, publié le 09/10/2009
Prenant comme champ d’étude la novella trépidante "Hottentots", tirée de The Steampunk Trilogy (1995), de l’auteur américain Paul Di Filippo (1954-…), cette communication cherche à montrer comment l’auteur, en virtuose reconnu du pastiche et de la parodie littéraire mais aussi scientifique, démonte, à travers un récit brouillé et comme parfois étouffé par différents niveaux d’intertextualité, les mécanismes de création littéraire à l’œuvre dans la littérature fantastique et la science-fiction des XIXème et XXème siècles pour peut-être mieux révéler les idéologies qui pourraient avoir contribué à leur élaboration.
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Paul Auster: A General Introduction par Jocelyn Dupont, publié le 13/02/2009
This document provides a short general overview of Paul Auster’s work. After a brief discussion of Auster’s texts positioning in the literary heritage, it tackles the place and role of the writer in an often alienating environment. It then deals with the representation of the city in Auster’s work, notably Brooklyn, before concluding on the gift for storytelling that so characterizes Paul Auster’s production.
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Moulding the Female Body in Victorian Fairy Tales and Sensation Novels - Introduction par Laurence Talairach-Vielmas, publié le 11/02/2009
L'introduction de l'ouvrage Moulding the Female Body in Victorian Fairy Tales and Sensation Novels est ici reproduite avec l'autorisation de la maison d'édition.
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Fiche de lecture : The Body, Hanif Kureishi par Laura Menard, publié le 03/05/2008
The narrator of Hanif Kureishi’s novella is a British playwright in his mid-sixties called Adam who experiences the difficulty of living as an aging man. His struggle to maintain his self-esteem and joie de vivre prompts him to give a very cynical account of the old people’s situation in a society ruled by beauty, youth and desire. Adam’s gloomy life takes a favorable turn – or so he thinks … - when he meets Ralph, a handsome and young admirer of his, who secretly informs him he can look just as healthy and fit as he: he may be operated on to have his mind transferred from his old, decaying body to a New Body.
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Les "Newgate Novels" : esthétique d'un genre populaire par Hubert Malfray , publié le 26/10/2007
Dans cet article, Hubert Malfray nous présente un genre mineur et éphémère regroupant une vingtaine d'oeuvres de fiction des années 1830-1847 relatant, de façon plus ou moins romancée, la vie de criminels. Comment, à une époque marquée par la rigueur morale, ces romans ont-ils pu représenter la criminalité et devenir des best-sellers ?
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Norme et criminalité à l'aube de l'ère victorienne par Hubert Malfray , publié le 25/10/2007
Plus qu'une notion purement judiciaire, la criminalité est au début de l'ère victorienne, avant tout appréhendée selon des valeurs morales et le criminel est celui qui ne se conforme pas à la conduite dictée par la société. Cette article propose une introduction au contexte social et pénal dans lequel s'insèrent les "Newgate Novels".
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