Vous êtes ici : Accueil / par_theme

Recherche multi-critères

Liste des résultats

Il y a 25 éléments qui correspondent à vos termes de recherche.
Promoting patients in narrative discourse: A developmental perspective par Harriet Jisa , publié le 18/12/2009
Languages provide speakers with a number of structural options for manipulating the expression of events in narrative discourse. Underlying narrative competence is the capacity to view events as dynamic actions composed of a bundle of elements such as, agent, patient, affectedness, etc. (Hopper and Thompson, 1980). This study examines the grammatical constructions used by children (5-6-, 7-8- and 10-11-year-olds) and adult speakers of Amharic, English, French and Hungarian to manipulate the expression of agent and patient participants in the expression of events. The narrative task used to elicit the data is composed of a series of pictures which recount the adventures of two principal characters (a boy and a dog) in search of their runaway frog (Frog, Where are you? Mayer 1969). Over the course of the story the boy and the dog encounter a host of secondary characters (a mole, an owl, a swarm of bees and a deer) and change participant status, going from controlling agent to affected patient of a secondary character's action. Our interest lies in the range of structures available in the languages studied and their use by children and adults in narrative discourse. We detail how children and adults native speakers of the four languages use topicalising constructions to promote the patient participant in an event to the starting point (Langacker, 1998) of the recounting of that event.
conference.png type-video.png
Fiche de lecture : The Brooklyn Follies, Paul Auster par Juliette Tran, publié le 05/07/2008
A review of Paul Auster's The Brooklyn Follies.
article.png
Rachel Cusk: Love narratives par Rachel Cusk, publié le 28/08/2014
If it’s true that we use narrative as a frame to make sense of the randomness of our human experience, then the story of romantic love might be seen as reflecting our profoundest anxieties about who and what we are, about what happens to us and why. The love narrative is ostensibly a story of progress, yet its true goal is to achieve an ending, a place of finality where nothing further needs to happen and the tension between fantasy and reality can cease. At the wedding of man and woman a veil is drawn, an ending arrived at: the reader closes the book, for marriage as it is lived represents the re-assertion of reality over narrative. Having committed this public act of participation and belief in the notion of life as a story, man and woman are left to order and confer meaning on their private experiences as best they can...
article.png
The spoken word and the written word in Paul Auster’s The Brooklyn Follies par Catherine Pesso-Miquel, publié le 16/10/2009
This article analyses the construction of voices in Paul Auster’s The Brooklyn Follies, in which the paradoxical relationship between printed signs on a page and phonemes uttered by human bodies is fore-grounded. Auster revels in creating lively dialogues that are carefully inscribed within a particular voice through the use of didascalia, but he also celebrates the physicality and euphony of a narrative voice which navigates between elegiac lyricism and sharp-witted humour. The Brooklyn Follies, like all Auster’s books, is a book about books, but this one is also a book about tales and story-telling, about speech and silence, and the very American tradition of tall tales.
article.png
David Samuels: My Troubles, and Yours par David Samuels, publié le 01/09/2015
David Samuels nous propose dans ce texte inédit, écrit à l’occasion des Assises Internationales du Roman 2015, une réflexion saisissante sur le principe d’ « auto-imagination » en dressant un parallèle entre l’autofiction et la montée des extrémismes politiques et religieux.
article.png
Narration in the Human Mind par Siri Hustvedt, publié le 16/02/2012
"Human beings are forever explaining themselves to themselves. This is the nature of our self-consciousness. We are not only awake and aware of the world around us, but are able to reflect on ourselves as actors in that world. We reason and we tell stories. Unlike our mammalian relatives who do not narrate their own lives, we become characters in our own tales, both when we recollect ourselves in the past and imagine ourselves in the future. Our ability to represent our experience in language - in those sounds and signs of our essential intersubjectivity - allows us the necessary symbolic alienation required for mental time travel..."
article.png
Conscious and Unconscious Narrative Literature, Psychoanalysis and Neuroscience par Siri Hustvedt, Lionel Naccache, publié le 20/01/2012
Nous passons une grande partie de notre vie à élaborer des fictions, à nous raconter des histoires et à en raconter aux autres. La narration est profondément enracinée dans l'esprit humain, à un niveau à la fois conscient et inconscient. Produire une narration est une façon de donner du sens à l'expérience factuelle. Mais les fictions créées par le cerveau humain et celles que les romanciers imaginent sont-elles de même nature ? L'écrivain américain Siri Hustvedt et le neurobiologiste français Lionel Naccache exprimeront leurs points de vue originaux, pénétrants et empathiques sur cette question. We all spend our time constructing fictions, telling stories to ourselves and to others. Narration is deeply rooted in the human mind, at a conscious and unconscious level. Producing a narrative is a way of giving meaning to factual experience. Are the fictions created by the human brain and those imagined by novelists of the same nature? American writer Siri Hustvedt and French neurobiologist Lionel Naccache express their original, incisive and empathetic views on these questions.
conference.png type-video.png
Proche de l'indigestion intertextuelle : "Des Hottentotes" de Paul Di Filippo par Jérôme Dutel, publié le 09/10/2009
Prenant comme champ d’étude la novella trépidante "Hottentots", tirée de The Steampunk Trilogy (1995), de l’auteur américain Paul Di Filippo (1954-…), cette communication cherche à montrer comment l’auteur, en virtuose reconnu du pastiche et de la parodie littéraire mais aussi scientifique, démonte, à travers un récit brouillé et comme parfois étouffé par différents niveaux d’intertextualité, les mécanismes de création littéraire à l’œuvre dans la littérature fantastique et la science-fiction des XIXème et XXème siècles pour peut-être mieux révéler les idéologies qui pourraient avoir contribué à leur élaboration.
conference.png type-video.png
La Création : à propos de stratégies narratives dans Frankenstein par Georges Zaragoza, publié le 19/04/2007
Né au XVIIe siècle, le genre romanesque s'est lontemps vu reprochées sa fausseté et sa stérilité. Georges Zaragoza se penche ici sur les stratégies narratives mises en place dans "Frankenstein" pour prouver à la fois l'authenticité et l'utilité du roman. L'article qui suit est une version d'un cours de Georges Zaragoza adapté par Kevin Pinault pour La clé des langues. Les numéros de pages des citations de Frankenstein renvoient à l'édition Penguin Classics, 1992.
article.png
Some Thoughts About Memory, Identity, and the False Family Narrative par Mira Bartók, publié le 15/01/2013
Identity and family legacy are partially formed by the family “memory narrative”—a family member, usually our mother or father, tells us stories about what happened before we were born or when we were too young to remember momentous events. But what happens when that narrator in the family is mentally ill, or a compulsive liar? In my case, my schizophrenic mother was the unreliable narrator of our family history. And my alcoholic father, a gifted writer who left when I was four, told my mother’s family grandiose lies about his own past.
article.png
David Vann: Secret and subtext par David Vann, publié le 07/10/2013
All of the conventions of literary fiction can be successfully broken except one: there must be subtext, a second story beneath the surface. We don’t have to care about a protagonist or even really have a protagonist. We’re not limited to any particular style or structure. But our entire idea of literature being “about” something is based on a second narrative, something else that the surface narrative can point to. What’s interesting to me about this is that we live in a time when surface narratives are taking over. Blogs are generally so worthless for this one reason, that they lack subtext. The online world is, above all, earnest, saying exactly what it means.
article.png
Gulliver's Travels (Jonathan Swift) par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 21/11/2014
Travel books were very fashionable in the eighteenth century. Real travelers sometimes included elements of fiction in their accounts of their wanderings to make them sound more exotic and interesting. In Gulliver's Travels, Jonathan Swift makes fun of this literary genre by introducing a fictitious traveler, Gulliver, who tells us about his encounters with strange creatures and countries. Gulliver's first person narrative is introduced by a fake publisher's note which is also written in the first person...
type-image.png exercice.png texte.png
Are You Going to Write That in Your Book? par Siddhartha Deb, publié le 03/12/2013
Born in north-eastern India in 1970, Siddhartha Deb is the recipient of grants from the Society of Authors in the UK and has been a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Studies at Harvard University. His latest book, a work of narrative nonfiction, ((The Beautiful and the Damned)), was a finalist for the Orwell Prize in the UK and the winner of the PEN Open award in the United States. His journalism, essays, and reviews have appeared in Harpers, The Guardian, The Observer, The New York Times, Bookforum, The Daily Telegraph, The Nation, n+1, and The Times Literary Supplement.
article.png
Some thoughts on silence and the contemporary “investigative memoir” par Marco Roth, publié le 06/12/2012
Critics and readers, at least in the United States, seem to be slower to recognize the investigative memoir as a narrative mode deserving of attention as such. The American memoir comes burdened with a history of survivor’s tales and evangelical Protestant redemption stories: the writer is usually delivered from bondage: slavery or captivity in the 19th century, Communism, Nazi Europe, or “substance abuse” in the 20th, and into freedom or the light of truth. THE END. Testifying, in both legal and religious senses, is important. Important too is the sense that the author can be written into a social order, given a normal or productive life...
article.png
The Victorian Sensation Novel par Sophie Lemercier-Goddard, David Amigoni, publié le 02/05/2008
The sensation novel developed in Britain in the 1860s with Wilkie Collins as its most famous representative and has been increasingly presented as a sub-genre revealing the cultural anxiety of the Victorian period. Its complex narrative which relies on a tangle of mysteries and secrets introduces the character of the detective while heavily resorting to the Gothic machinery with the figure of the persecuted maiden and that of the villain.
son.png bibliographie.png
Brigitte Gauthier : Harold Pinter et le théâtre de la distorsion par Brigitte Gauthier, publié le 03/12/2015
Brigitte Gauthier nous rappelle dans cet entretien les grandes thématiques du théâtre d'Harold Pinter. Celui-ci dépeint les enjeux des interactions entre les individus et adopte une neutralité absolue: il se fait le témoin des "nuances marécageuses" dans lesquelles disparaissent toute règle, afin de nous prévenir du danger politique et des enjeux humains essentiels. Son théâtre est celui de la fragmentation, de la distorsion narrative et linguistique.
type-video.png conference.png
Keith Scribner: Representation and Psychology of Conflict par Keith Scribner, publié le 27/08/2013
In his Nobel Prize acceptance speech William Faulkner famously said that all real meaning in fiction comes from the human heart in conflict with itself. As a novelist I’m compelled by the internal conflicts inherent in the stories we tell ourselves in order to live and how those stories come to define us, how they allow us to justify our actions and possibly delude ourselves about who we are. Like any narrative, these stories help us shape otherwise disparate experiences into a comprehensible form. Over time we become so heavily invested in these narratives that when their veracity is challenged, the resulting conflict can be explosive.
article.png
Le retour dans The God of Small Things d’Arundhati Roy par Elsa Sacksick, publié le 02/05/2011
The God of Small Things, est une œuvre sous le signe du retour. Celui-ci s'inscrit dans le rapport à l'espace, au temps, dans la construction narrative et se révèle affecter la langue elle-même. Nous verrons, après avoir étudié les différentes modalités du retour en tant que réitération, que s'il prend à première vue la forme d'un ressassement, d'une régression ou d'un bégaiement, il apparaît également à l'origine d'un rythme puissant qui scande l'écriture et lui insuffle une qualité éminemment poétique.
article.png
Shakespeare, Robert Greene et la théorie du plagiat : Nouveaux horizons par Jean-François Chappuit, publié le 10/11/2011
Quelques jours avant de mourir, Robert Greene compose un pamphlet dans lequel il assimile Shakespeare à « un corbeau arriviste paré de nos plumes ». Les « Désintégrateurs » ont vu dans cette invective une accusation de plagiat en référence à Horace et à la fable du Choucas paré des plumes d’autres oiseaux. Mais plusieurs difficultés demeurent dont le type d’oiseau en question, la trame narrative, le rôle des citations incluses dans la fable, le sens général de la fable. Dans les traditions grecque et latine, le thème commun de cette fable est la vanité de vouloir se faire autre que l’on est par nature, non l’accusation de plagiat. A la Renaissance, ces deux traditions fusionnent dans les collections humanistes. Je souhaite démontrer que la théorie du plagiat ne semble pas valide mais qu’en revanche le pamphlet de Robert Greene a une portée plus essentielle concernant Shakespeare, portée qui fonde son véritable intérêt.
article.png
Across the ‘Wide Sargasso Sea’: Jean Rhys’s Revision of Charlotte Brontë’s Eurocentric Gothic par Sylvie Maurel, publié le 20/03/2008
In this article, Sylvie Maurel analyses the Gothic destabilizing machinery at work in Jean Rhys’s "Wide Sargasso Sea". The first Gothic element the author looks at is the demonic agency that haunts the novel. Colonial history lingers in Rhys’s world and accounts for some of the strange and unexpected phenomena that occur on the island. Actually, the narrative is under the double influence of a past set in an actual history of slavery and a future already written in the story of "Jane Eyre". Rhys’s characters have an uncanny prescience of what lies ahead and a sense that they cannot evade repetition. The motif of witchcraft is another element that links "WSS" to the Gothic. The motif goes beyond a picturesque reference to the West Indian context and functions as a metaphor of the relationship between language and power. Christophine’s witchcraft and Rochester’s Eurocentric discourse are two similar attempts at transforming the world through language. The power of language is also reflected in the way the novel constantly brings together multiple voices and conflicting views which seem to hide a secret rather than reveal a final truth. Rochester can only feel the presence of such a secret and risks delirium as he tries to get a grip on something that constantly eludes him.
article.png
The Great Mouse Plot (Roald Dahl) par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 25/11/2014
In Boy: Tales of Childhood, Roald Dahl tells us about his youth, focusing on some of his most remarkable childhood memories. A lot of irony is introduced by the first person narrator who describes these scenes with the hindsight of age.
exercice.png texte.png
Writing on the self par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 14/11/2014
Critics and academics tend to draw a line between autobiography and fiction. However, it is sometimes difficult to make such a clear distinction between what is made up and what is not. Here are some short texts written by authors who reflect on their use of the first person.
exercice.png texte.png
Self-portraits par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 13/11/2014
A self-portrait is a drawn, engraved, painted, photographed or sculpted representation of an artist by himself. Self-portraits have been a common art form since the Renaissance, a period when artists had a prominent part in society and when a distinct interest in the individual as a subject arose.
type-image.png exercice.png texte.png
First person narratives par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 10/11/2014
Ce dossier sur le thème des auteurs écrivant à la première personne regroupe trois ressources accompagnées d'exercices de compréhension et de production orales et écrites, ainsi que d'analyse d'image.
dossier.png exercice.png
La narrativité des 'progresses' : Marriage à-la-mode par Clifford Armion, publié le 11/04/2011
La série la plus célèbre de Hogarth est une satire du mariage arrangé entre l'héritier d'une famille noble désargentée et la fille d'un riche bourgeois de Londres. Les tableaux, peints par Hogarth entre 1743 et 1745, se vendirent mal ; cent vingt Guinées alors que l'encadrement à lui seul en avait coûté vingt-quatre. Ces toiles qui font aujourd'hui partie des collections de la national Gallery sont peintes à l'envers du sens voulu pour les gravures, cela pour éviter le travail fastidieux d'une copie au miroir. Hogarth avait pour visée principale la série de gravures. Elle sera réalisée par des français (G. Scotin, B. Baron, S. F. Ravenet), à l'exception des visages que Hogarth prétend avoir gravés lui-même.
article.png