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Across the ‘Wide Sargasso Sea’: Jean Rhys’s Revision of Charlotte Brontë’s Eurocentric Gothic par Sylvie Maurel, publié le 20/03/2008
In this article, Sylvie Maurel analyses the Gothic destabilizing machinery at work in Jean Rhys’s "Wide Sargasso Sea". The first Gothic element the author looks at is the demonic agency that haunts the novel. Colonial history lingers in Rhys’s world and accounts for some of the strange and unexpected phenomena that occur on the island. Actually, the narrative is under the double influence of a past set in an actual history of slavery and a future already written in the story of "Jane Eyre". Rhys’s characters have an uncanny prescience of what lies ahead and a sense that they cannot evade repetition. The motif of witchcraft is another element that links "WSS" to the Gothic. The motif goes beyond a picturesque reference to the West Indian context and functions as a metaphor of the relationship between language and power. Christophine’s witchcraft and Rochester’s Eurocentric discourse are two similar attempts at transforming the world through language. The power of language is also reflected in the way the novel constantly brings together multiple voices and conflicting views which seem to hide a secret rather than reveal a final truth. Rochester can only feel the presence of such a secret and risks delirium as he tries to get a grip on something that constantly eludes him.
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Shakespeare’s The Rape of Lucrece: the wound that cannot heal par Clifford Armion, publié le 17/09/2010
In Shakespeare's works, the assaults on the body and the marks they leave in the flesh constitute a complex form of language. The shape of the wound, its seriousness, its position on the body, the situation in which it was inflicted, the terms and metaphors used to describe it: all these elements contribute to its semantic load.
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A.S. Byatt - Assises Internationales du Roman 2010 par A.S. Byatt , Emilie Walezac , publié le 10/06/2010
In May 2010, Antonia Susan Byatt took part in the fourth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She granted us an interview and was kind enough to read a passage form The Children's Book, her latest novel.
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"Come, unbutton here": Exposing "the thing itself" in Shakespeare’s King Lear par Denis Lagae-Devoldère, publié le 14/02/2010
The first definition of the verb "to expose" in the Oxford English Dictionary is "to put out", "to deprive of shelter", "to turn out of doors", formed on the original Latin exponere: in King Lear, the king is famously kicked out of his respective daughters' houses and exposed to the elements. Throughout the play, such exposure to danger goes hand in hand with the exposure of something or somebody, which the OED defines as to denounce or to lay open (to danger, to ridicule, to censure)...
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Seeing Between the Lines: Terence Davies’s The House of Mirth and the art of adaptation par Wendy Everett, publié le 02/03/2015
Examining Terence Davies’s adaptation of Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth, this article identifies ways in which the creative interpretation of the filmmaker may serve to open up new insights into both the original text and the language of cinema itself. It considers, in particular, aspects such as music, painting, and visual metaphor in its presentation of cinema as an essentially multilayered and complex medium which requires of the spectator an imaginative and creative engagement, just as the novel requires of the reader.
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The “obstinate resistance” of Woolf’s short stories par Christine Reynier, publié le 31/03/2009
I have often wondered why, although I have regularly gone back to Virginia Woolf's short stories, I still feel I do not know them very well. This is of course no other than the secret charm of Woolf's short stories: they are so hermetic or puzzling that one cannot help re-reading them; they are so varied that one keeps forgetting them; they are so challenging that one feels bound to delve into them again and again. They offer the "obstinate resistance" (Woolf 1988: 158) of the text that Woolf loves in Sir Thomas Browne's writings and that she analyses in her essay "Reading". The military metaphor of resistance might suggest that once the fortress of the text has been assaulted, it will surrender to the reader. However, the author makes it clear that such is not the case.
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"As Many Fingers as Needed": The Body as Musician and its Fetishes par Peter Szendy, publié le 19/12/2013
"To comfortably acquire, so to speak, as many fingers as needed," said one of Bach’s sons, Carl Philipp Emanuel, in his Essay on the True Art of Playing the Keyboard (1753). And these words are remarkable, as long as we are prepared to take them literally, and not hastily consider them as one of the metaphors that adorn discourse about music and on the bodies that it evokes.
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