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William Finnegan on Memory and Non-Fiction par William Finnegan, publié le 09/10/2017
A l'occasion des Assises Internationales du Roman (2017), William Finnegan a écrit un texte sur la mémoire et la non-fiction.
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“When the Indians were there”: memory and forgetfulness in Alice Munro’s Dance of the Happy Shades par Lorie-Anne Rainville, publié le 01/03/2016
Le laboratoire ERIBIA et le département d’anglais de l’Université de Caen Normandie accueillaient le vendredi 8 janvier 2016 une journée d’étude autour du programme de l’agrégation externe d’anglais 2016. Les textes des communications sont réunis ici en deux parties : littérature et civilisation.
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Remembering 9/11 - Politics of Memory par Marita Sturken, Claire Richard, publié le 31/03/2014
One of the reasons I was interested in trying to unpack the meanings of kitsch memory culture, say for instance in relationship to 9/11, is precisely the ways in which it creates this culture of comfort, that allows us to feel reassured. And that allows us to not confront the larger questions, about the project of American empire, about the project of national identity, about our priorities and our values as a nation, and about the kind of sacrifices that we have demanded on those serving in the armed forces, and all of the ways in which many families and many communities were really devastated by the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan...
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Rencontre avec Paul Auster et Siri Hustvedt par Paul Auster, Siri Hustvedt, Clifford Armion, publié le 13/02/2018
Le 17 janvier 2018, la Villa Gillet a permis à 9 classes de lycée de rencontrer les auteurs Paul Auster et Siri Hustvedt. Les questions portaient principalement sur les nombreux écrits de Siri Hustvedt ainsi que le dernier roman de Paul Auster, 4, 3, 2, 1.
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Hugo Hamilton on memory and fiction par Hugo Hamilton, publié le 24/06/2013
It’s a stormy night in Dublin. My father comes into the bedroom to close the window. But the old sash window is rotten. As he tries pull it down, the wooden frame comes apart in his hands like a piece of fruit cake. The glass is smashed. So my father has to find a way to cover over the gaps. He looks around and picks up the nearest thing at hand. In the corner of the room there is a map of the world, a big rolled up school atlas which he’s kept from the time he was a schoolteacher. He rolls it out and nails the atlas up against the window frame. It’s a temporary solution, he says. Go to sleep. So that’s how I fall asleep, with the wind blowing across the world, flapping at the oceans and the continents. The world is there in the morning with the sun coming through.
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Some Thoughts About Memory, Identity, and the False Family Narrative par Mira Bartók, publié le 15/01/2013
Identity and family legacy are partially formed by the family “memory narrative”—a family member, usually our mother or father, tells us stories about what happened before we were born or when we were too young to remember momentous events. But what happens when that narrator in the family is mentally ill, or a compulsive liar? In my case, my schizophrenic mother was the unreliable narrator of our family history. And my alcoholic father, a gifted writer who left when I was four, told my mother’s family grandiose lies about his own past.
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Barbie Zelizer on the power of images par Barbie Zelizer, Clifford Armion, publié le 06/01/2014
Barbie Zelizer is a Professor of Communication, and holds the Raymond Williams Chair of Communication and is Director of the Scholars Program in Culture and Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. A former journalist, Professor Zelizer's work focuses on the cultural dimensions of journalism, with a specific interest in journalistic authority, collective memory, and journalistic images in times of crisis and war. She also works on the impact of disciplinary knowledge on academic inquiry.
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Reconfigurations of space in Partition novels par Sandrine Soukaï, publié le 19/09/2019
This article examines two Indian novels Clear Light of Day (1980) by Anita Desai and The Shadow Lines (1988) by Amitav Ghosh along with Burnt Shadows (2009) by Anglo-Pakistani novelist Kamila Shamsie, books written about the Partition of India that accompanied independence in 1947. Partition led to violence on an enormous scale; the exact number of people who were killed has never been ascertained, and estimates vary between one and two million. Partition also caused massive displacements of population, estimated between 12 and 18 million. This paper examines the way in which space – national, familial and communal – was divided and then reshaped by and through Partition. After discussing the fractures, ruptures and uprooting brought about by this trauma, I will consider the way in which diasporic writers devise fictional maps of memory of the past that foster exchanges across geographical borders.
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