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Identity (Dana Spiotta) par Dana Spiotta, publié le 26/08/2015
I read obituaries. I love to read about people who were notable for one thing—say the woman who appears in a famous photo at Kent State. I am drawn to what people think of as failures: the guy who backed the wrong videotape format or the guy who lost an election after a tweet. I like to read about people whose lives took dramatic turns, like the guy who spent most of his life running an ice cream shop in New Jersey but secretly had a past life as a war criminal. I am fascinated by secret lives or multiplex identities. I imagine the day-to-day ordinary life, what does it feel like over time. I wonder about consequences, guilt, and redemption. I wonder how your past shapes who you are. And I wonder about the life that takes shape around an event. How a fleeting moment can change you, or maybe not. Maybe you are you no matter what.
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Some Thoughts on Identity par Claude Arnaud, publié le 18/01/2013
It is the topic par excellence, the enigma that is impossible to solve. This puppet that we call somewhat pompously “The Self,” what is it in the end? An actor who resigns himself, around the age of thirty, to play only one role, or a born clown who struggles to understand himself, having changed so often?
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Some Thoughts About Memory, Identity, and the False Family Narrative par Mira Bartók, publié le 15/01/2013
Identity and family legacy are partially formed by the family “memory narrative”—a family member, usually our mother or father, tells us stories about what happened before we were born or when we were too young to remember momentous events. But what happens when that narrator in the family is mentally ill, or a compulsive liar? In my case, my schizophrenic mother was the unreliable narrator of our family history. And my alcoholic father, a gifted writer who left when I was four, told my mother’s family grandiose lies about his own past.
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Mobility and Immobility in Colm Tóibín’s Brooklyn: Migration as a Static Initiatory Journey par Coline Pavia, publié le 01/07/2020
Colm Tóibín’s Brooklyn centres on Eilis Lacey’s migration from Ireland to Brooklyn. The protagonist’s spatial mobility is accompanied by an identity change, as her self evolves when she settles in New York. Although she embarks on an initiatory journey through migration, Eilis faces various forms of immobility: the American territory resembles Ireland, and she is confronted to family duty when she thought she would escape it. This article therefore shows that the protagonist’s migration in Brooklyn is paradoxically mainly static, in terms of both space and identity. However, Eilis’s mobility still fosters a form of inner transformation as she is faced with a division between her Irish and American homes and between two selves that are irreconcilable.
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Beauty, Intensity, Asymmetry par François Chaignaud, publié le 16/02/2012
"Beauty, Intensity, Asymmetry are born in my mouth like three goddesses ripe for veneration - far more than Identity, Gender, or Transgression, and utterly different from them. But this Beauty, of which we know only that some wish to buy but never to sell it, much less allow it to disappear or cause it to flee - nor to be the man or woman who no longer possesses anything but memories of it - is she a prescriptive goddess?"
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Dana Spiotta: Disillusion par Dana Spiotta, publié le 15/09/2015
Ce texte original de Dana Spiotta a été écrit dans le cadre des Assises Internationales du Roman 2015.
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Fiche de lecture : Arthur and George, Julian Barnes par Thibaud Harrois, publié le 07/05/2008
The novel is based on an actual story, known as the "Great Wyrley Outrages". At the end of the 19th century, George Edalji, a solicitor from Great Wyrley, a village near Birmingham, was wrongly found guilty of slaying a number of farm animals. He was sentenced to seven years in jail. In 1906, Edalji was released but he was not pardoned. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the famous author of the Sherlock Holmes stories, was involved in the case. Indeed, he tried to prove the man's innocence and was at the source of what was considered as an English Dreyfus Case.
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The Sociolinguistics of Identity par Peter Stockwell, Manuel Jobert, publié le 31/03/2009
Le grand débat de la sociolinguistique aujourd'hui tourne autour de la question de la place que doit (ou ne doit pas) occuper la notion d'identité dans l'analyse sociolinguistique. Invité par le Centre d'Etudes Linguistiques de l'Université Lyon 3, Peter Stockwell, Professeur à l'Université de Nottingham, spécialiste de stylistique cognitive et de sociolinguistique, clôt sa série de conférences en revenant sur ce débat.
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Understanding the social media: an interview with Jeffrey Rosen par Jeffrey Rosen, Clifford Armion, publié le 10/01/2013
Now that we’re living most of our lives online, all of us are vulnerable to the internet. The difficulty with young people is that they may not have experienced the dangers of not being able to escape your past until it’s too late. I like to tell the story of Stacy Sneider, the young 22 year old teacher in training who posted a picture of herself on Myspace wearing a pirate’s hat and drinking from a plastic cup that said drunken pirate. Her supervisor at the school said she was promoting drinking and she was fired. She sued and was unable to get her job back and she had to pick an entirely different career. That’s a very dramatic example on how vulnerable all of us are to being judged out of context by a single image or ill chosen picture and once you do that it may be very hard to escape your past.
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Aboriginal Australians and the white population, a troubled relationship par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 03/01/2012
Ce dossier sur les relations difficiles entre aborigènes et blancs en Australie regroupe trois ressources accompagnées d'exercices de compréhension et de production orales et écrites, ainsi que d'analyse d'image.
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Sally Morgan, Citizenship (1988) par Sally Morgan, ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 03/01/2012
Sally Morgan est une auteure et une artiste australienne aborigène. Ses travaux traitent des relations troublées entre aborigènes et population blanche en Australie au cours du XXème siècle. A partir d'une oeuvre de cette artiste, cette page propose plusieurs exercices d'analyse d'image.
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Precarious Borders: The Nation-State and Arab Diaspora Literature par Jumana Bayeh, publié le 30/01/2020
In this talk, Jumana Bayeh (Macquarie University, Sydney), author of The Literature of the Lebanese Diaspora: Representations of Place and Transnational Identity (2014) outlines her latest project which proposes to trace the representation of borders and the nation-state across a century of Arab writing in English.
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“I, poor monster” (Twelfth Night, II. 2. 33): Monsters as Subjects in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and The Tempest par Manon Turban, publié le 02/10/2018
This paper aims to study how the unusual characterisation of Caliban and Bottom as feeling and thinking subjects in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream and The Tempest provokes the emergence of compassion, an emotion which monsters seldom inspired in the early modern period and which invites the audience to catch a glimpse of the mutability of human identity in these two monstrous characters.
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Remembering 9/11 - Politics of Memory par Marita Sturken, Claire Richard, publié le 31/03/2014
One of the reasons I was interested in trying to unpack the meanings of kitsch memory culture, say for instance in relationship to 9/11, is precisely the ways in which it creates this culture of comfort, that allows us to feel reassured. And that allows us to not confront the larger questions, about the project of American empire, about the project of national identity, about our priorities and our values as a nation, and about the kind of sacrifices that we have demanded on those serving in the armed forces, and all of the ways in which many families and many communities were really devastated by the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan...
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Not Looking for Love par Chris Kraus, publié le 17/12/2012
As women, we are often identified through our choice of sexual partners. When an “attractive” woman has sex with an ugly man, it is a descent into “abjection.” But why? Clearly, it is because as women, we are still believed to attain most of our identities through sexuality. In the present assimilationist climate, any non-monogamous, non-relational sexual act is read as a symptom of emotional damage. Our culture persists in believing that sex holds the magic key to a person’s identity — which is, of course, wrong — and in behaving as if female writers are uniquely charged with upholding the sacred intimacy of the sexual act.
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Fiche de lecture : The Bear Boy, Cynthia Ozick par Anne Musset, publié le 07/05/2008
The story is set in the outskirts of the Bronx in 1935. Rose Meadows, orphaned at the age of 18, becomes an assistant to Professor Mitwisser, a specialist of a 9th-century heretic Jewish sect. Professor Mitwisser, his wife (a renowned physicist but now a near-madwoman) and their five children are German refugees who survive thanks to their young benefactor James A’Bair. James is heir to the fortune amassed by his father, who took him as a model for a very popular series of children’s books called The Bear Boy. James is extremely wealthy but troubled, dispossessed of his identity. He leads a nomadic life and his latest whim is to support the Mitwisser family. Rose enters into this chaotic household, which becomes even more unstable with the arrival of James. Very soon this little precarious world verges on disaster.
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