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Insurrection, the Paris Commune, and Leaves of Grass par Betsy Erkkilä, publié le 15/11/2018
Professeure invitée à l'ENS de Lyon, Betsy Erkkilä (Northwestern University) a donné une série de conférences sur Leaves of Grass de Walt Whitman. Dans cette deuxième conférence, elle explore l'influence des insurrections populaires en France sur le langage démocratique utilisé dans Leaves of Grass et sur la structure des différentes éditions du recueil.
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The Whitman Revolution: Why Poetry Matters par Betsy Erkkilä, publié le 12/11/2018
Professeure invitée à l'ENS de Lyon, Betsy Erkkilä (Northwestern University) a donné une série de conférences sur Leaves of Grass de Walt Whitman. Elle revient ici sur l'aspect révolutionnaire de la poésie de Whitman.
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Meritocracy (David Samuels) par David Samuels, publié le 11/06/2015
“Meritocracy” is the comic honorific that the American elite has awarded to itself in recognition of its accomplishments since the end of the Cold War. The coinage has proved to be a lasting and significant one because it does so many kinds of necessary work at once. “Meritocracy” assuages the inherent tension that exists between the terms “elite” and “popular democracy” by suggesting that the new American elite has earned its position in an entirely democratic way. Yes, we do have an elite, the word admits, as other nations do: but our elite merely consists of the most “meritorious” members of our democracy, and so any potentially troubling contradiction dissolves in a pleasurable way that both the early Puritans and their plutocratic descendents might easily recognize. The fortunes of the founders of Google and Facebook provide us with reassuring proof that the more we have, the more deserving we are.
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Minorities and democracy par Siddhartha Deb, publié le 17/01/2014
In 1916, the Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore delivered a series of lectures that would eventually be collected into the book, Nationalism. Tagore was writing in the glow of his own celebrity (he had just won the Nobel Prize for literature) and from within the heart of the crisis engulfing the modern world, two years into the slow, grim war that had converted Europe into a labyrinth of trenches covered over with clouds of poison gas. For Tagore, this was the tragic but inevitable outcome of a social calculus that valued efficiency, profit and, especially, the spirit of us versus them that bonded together the inhabitants of one nation and allowed them to go out, conquer and enslave other people, most of them members of no nation at all.
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Le « Port Huron Statement » du Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) : entre idéalisme démocratique et programme politique novateur par Frédéric Robert, publié le 04/10/2010
Le Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), mouvement-phare des étudiants appartenant à la Nouvelle Gauche contestataire des années soixante, était le successeur de l'Intercollegiate Socialist Society (ISS), organisation d'étudiants fondée en 1905 par Upton Sinclair, Clarence Darrow et Jack London...
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New Labour and the neo-liberal ascendancy: the case of public service reform par Eric Shaw, publié le 01/03/2010
A much debated topic has been the fundamental thrust of the New Labour project. Was it about the modernisation of social democracy or its abandonment? Did it adapt itself to the settlement bequeathed by Thatcherism and the neo-liberal paradigm it entrenched or seek it transcend it? This article discusses these contending interpretations focusing on the issue of public service reform, which lay at the heart of New Labour's domestic programme. It then explores the effects of New Labour's market-oriented 'modernisation' strategy on what social democrats have traditionally regarded as the normative underpinning of the public services, the 'public service ethos'.
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Reducing social democracy’s last redoubt: the privatisation and marketisation of the NHS in England par Colin Leys, publié le 12/02/2010
Since 1980 the NHS has been converted from a planned, integrated service, to a set of quasi-businesses operating in a health care market, in which an increasingly significant role is being played by for-profit corporations. This policy was initiated by the Conservatives under Margaret Thatcher and John Major but continued and driven much further by the Labour governments of Tony Blair and Gordon Brown. The paper outlines the sequence of initiatives through which the transformation has been accomplished and assesses what has driven the change, and why it has been so relatively easy to accomplish.
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