Vous êtes ici : Accueil / par_theme

Recherche multi-critères

Liste des résultats

Il y a 31 éléments qui correspondent à vos termes de recherche.
Rencontre avec Ian McEwan autour de son roman Atonement par Ian McEwan, Vanessa Guignery, publié le 29/06/2018
Dans le cadre des Assises Internationales du Roman, Ian McEwan est venu à l'École Normale Supérieure de Lyon pour parler de son roman Atonement. Cette rencontre avec les étudiant.e.s a été organisée par Vanessa Guignery, professeur de littérature anglaise et postcoloniale à l'ENS, membre du laboratoire IHRIM, en collaboration avec la Villa Gillet.
type-video.png entretien.png
Rencontre avec Salman Rushdie par Salman Rushdie, Vanessa Guignery, publié le 12/06/2017
À l’occasion des Assises Internationales du Roman, Vanessa Guignery, Professeur à l’Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, a organisé à la Villa Gillet le 30 mai 2017 une rencontre entre Salman Rushdie et des étudiants. La rencontre portait en partie sur le dernier roman de Salman Rushdie, Two Years, Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights, mais également sur ses autres œuvres, son métier d’écrivain et son rapport à la littérature.
type-video.png entretien.png
Death and Contemporary Political Imaginaries in Dalit Literature in India par Udaya Kumar, publié le 18/06/2018
Udaya Kumar (Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi) était Professeur invité à l’ENS de Lyon du 12 au 30 octobre 2017 et a donné trois conférences en anglais sur la littérature Dalit du Sud de l’Inde. La troisième de ces conférences porte sur la représentation des phénomènes de possession dans la littérature Dalit et sur l'impact politique du suicide.
type-video.png conference.png
Fundamentalism and Literature par Nilufer Bharucha, Frédéric Regard, Anne Dromart, publié le 17/09/2009
La Clé des Langues vous propose d'écouter une sélection de communications prononcées à l'occasion de cet évènement accueilli par L'Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon les 29 et 30 mai 2008.
conference.png son.png
The Essential David Shrigley par Johanna Felter, publié le 21/05/2013
"David Shrigley is a multidisciplinary artist who started his career in the early nineties self-publishing art books containing cartoon-like drawings for which he is mainly famous. Their trademarks, which are also recognizable in his varied artistic productions – clumsy execution, sloppy handwriting, disturbing or puzzling text, dark humour and uncanny atmosphere – helped Shrigley to gradually shape a clearly distinctive personality in his work which brought him out as one of the current key figures of British contemporary art scene."
article.png type-image.png
For Free Union in Criticism par Pierre Bayard, publié le 14/02/2012
The idea of attributing old works to new authors is not original. It has long been practiced by those lovers of literature, our students, who do not hesitate to attribute The Old Man and the Sea to Melville or War and Peace to Dostoevsky. What is interesting is that this kind of reinvention is not always properly appreciated by teachers. Students are not the only readers to practice reattribution. Scientific discoveries have on occasion forced historians of literature - and even more, of art - to ascribe works to creators other than those to whom they were at first incorrectly attributed...
article.png
The Paradoxes and Crisis of Contemporary Conservatism par David O'Brien , publié le 24/04/2007
A partir d'une définition de 5 piliers du conservatisme américain, David O'Brien nous explique comment l'action des élites conservatrices américaines au cours des 25 dernières années a conduit à un renversement de ces valeurs menant à la crise qui s'est révélée dans l'échec électoral des républicains en novembre 2006.
type-video.png conference.png
How Healing Are Books? par Pierre Zaoui, publié le 22/01/2013
The idea that novels, theater, or poetry often help us live, that they help us feel cleansed or feel stronger, more energized, more alive, or that they at least help us survive by giving us the boost we need to hang on a little longer, is not simply a constant topos of literature, be it western, eastern, or universal. It is an indisputable truth for those who make use of it, whether they write it, read it, comment on it, or transform it into a first-aid kid of maxim-prescriptions and citation-medicines to use as needed.
article.png
Caste and the Present: Modernity, Modernism and Dalit Writing in India par Udaya Kumar, publié le 27/04/2018
Udaya Kumar (Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi) était Professeur invité à l’ENS de Lyon du 12 au 30 octobre 2017 et a donné trois conférences en anglais sur la littérature Dalit du Sud de l’Inde. La première de ces conférences explore la représentation du système de castes dans la littérature Dalit.
type-video.png conference.png
William Finnegan on Memory and Non-Fiction par William Finnegan, publié le 09/10/2017
A l'occasion des Assises Internationales du Roman (2017), William Finnegan a écrit un texte sur la mémoire et la non-fiction.
texte.png monographie.png
Ragnarok - A conversation with A.S. Byatt par A.S. Byatt, Clifford Armion, publié le 03/06/2013
A.S. Byatt took part in the seventh edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She answered our questions on her latest novel, Ragnarok.
entretien.png type-video.png texte.png
The Intensive Care Unit: A Place of Technology and Myth par Cécile Guilbert, publié le 22/01/2013
If we follow Giorgio Agamben, who defined “religion as that which subtracts things, places, animals and persons from common use to transfer them into a separate sphere,” the intensive care unit seems to be a sacred place within the hospital because it is special, separate, and governed by specific protocols, whether we’re talking about reduced visiting hours or its bunker-like nature (like the operating room and the morgue). And because it’s the place of suspension between life and death, a passageway between the conscious and the unconscious, or between presence and absence, intensive care is the place for all sorts of metaphysical questions, in the form of oxymora. What’s at stake here, for the patient—a dying life? A living death? What then is life? and death?
article.png
Moulding the Female Body in Victorian Fairy Tales and Sensation Novels - Introduction par Laurence Talairach-Vielmas, publié le 11/02/2009
L'introduction de l'ouvrage Moulding the Female Body in Victorian Fairy Tales and Sensation Novels est ici reproduite avec l'autorisation de la maison d'édition.
article.png
The Victorian Sensation Novel par Sophie Lemercier-Goddard, David Amigoni, publié le 02/05/2008
The sensation novel developed in Britain in the 1860s with Wilkie Collins as its most famous representative and has been increasingly presented as a sub-genre revealing the cultural anxiety of the Victorian period. Its complex narrative which relies on a tangle of mysteries and secrets introduces the character of the detective while heavily resorting to the Gothic machinery with the figure of the persecuted maiden and that of the villain.
son.png bibliographie.png
Mise en contexte de la littérature anglaise par Frédéric Regard, publié le 29/06/2007
Frédéric Regard propose dans cet article une mise en perspective historique et politique de la production littéraire anglaise au fil des siècles. Ces éléments de mise en contexte sont à lire en parallèle avec l'ouvrage du même auteur, La littérature anglaise (Que sais-je?, 2007).
article.png
Some thoughts on silence and the contemporary “investigative memoir” par Marco Roth, publié le 06/12/2012
Critics and readers, at least in the United States, seem to be slower to recognize the investigative memoir as a narrative mode deserving of attention as such. The American memoir comes burdened with a history of survivor’s tales and evangelical Protestant redemption stories: the writer is usually delivered from bondage: slavery or captivity in the 19th century, Communism, Nazi Europe, or “substance abuse” in the 20th, and into freedom or the light of truth. THE END. Testifying, in both legal and religious senses, is important. Important too is the sense that the author can be written into a social order, given a normal or productive life...
article.png
The Neurosciences and Literature: an “exquisite corpse” or a “meeting of the minds”? par Lionel Naccache, publié le 16/02/2012
In the context of the Walls and Bridges project in New York, a meeting has been organized for October between an American novelist - Siri Hustvedt - and a French neuroscientist on the topic of "fiction," both mental and literary. This will obviously be the time to ask ourselves: can we imagine a promising future for meetings between the neurosciences of cognition and the world of literary creation? Is this merely the random juxtaposition of two terms to which we are attached, or the genuine dialectical culmination of self-consciousness? An amusing, trendy quid pro quo, or a key moment in our knowledge of ourselves as tale tellers?
article.png
Conscious and Unconscious Narrative Literature, Psychoanalysis and Neuroscience par Siri Hustvedt, Lionel Naccache, publié le 20/01/2012
Nous passons une grande partie de notre vie à élaborer des fictions, à nous raconter des histoires et à en raconter aux autres. La narration est profondément enracinée dans l'esprit humain, à un niveau à la fois conscient et inconscient. Produire une narration est une façon de donner du sens à l'expérience factuelle. Mais les fictions créées par le cerveau humain et celles que les romanciers imaginent sont-elles de même nature ? L'écrivain américain Siri Hustvedt et le neurobiologiste français Lionel Naccache exprimeront leurs points de vue originaux, pénétrants et empathiques sur cette question. We all spend our time constructing fictions, telling stories to ourselves and to others. Narration is deeply rooted in the human mind, at a conscious and unconscious level. Producing a narrative is a way of giving meaning to factual experience. Are the fictions created by the human brain and those imagined by novelists of the same nature? American writer Siri Hustvedt and French neurobiologist Lionel Naccache express their original, incisive and empathetic views on these questions.
conference.png type-video.png
Rebelling as a female in the 18th and 19th century literature. From Pamela to Jane Eyre: a path to equality? par Marion Lopez-Burette, publié le 23/09/2013
This article intends to study and compare the way Pamela, Richardson's early heroine of the novel genre, and Charlotte Brontë's romantic Jane, rebel. What follows will underscore the path trodden by female fictional characters in terms of shaping the individual, from the Enlightenment period to the romantic era. The patterns of entrapment and self-willed seclusion the protagonists are involved in function as incentives for rebellion. The ideals they rebel for play the role of living forces in a way that is meaningful to comprehend how the essence of rebellion evolved with time. No matter how much the protagonists' respective procedure may differ, from moral conservatism to personal answering of moral questions through rites of passage, the two female heroines are equally conscious of their value as human beings. Their handling of their hardships and their allegiance to God, however, points to the qualitative and quantitative evolution of the notion of equality.
article.png
The Intensification of Punishment from Thatcher to Blair: From conservative authoritarianism to punitive interventionism par Emma Bell, publié le 12/03/2010
Emma Bell is a Senior Lecturer in British Studies at Savoie University (Chambéry). Her research focuses on contemporary British penal policy. She will be publishing a book on the subject entitled Criminal Justice and Neoliberalism at the end of 2010 with Palgrave Macmillan.
article.png
"Language is a movement between scattered forms": Interview with Amitava Kumar par Amitava Kumar, Natacha Lasorak, publié le 25/10/2019
Amitava Kumar is an Indian writer and journalist who teaches literature at Vassar College. In this interview, he talks about his collection of essays Away: The Indian Writer as an Expatriate (2004) and his novel Immigrant, Montana (2017), and focuses on the notion of "home", immigration, the caste system and the political situation in India.
type-video.png texte.png entretien.png
Dystopia in the plays of Samuel Beckett : Purgatory in Play par Eleanor Bryce, publié le 14/09/2012
The literary genre of dystopia remains popular in the English-speaking world, particularly in young adult fiction. In this age of rapid technological advances, and the threat (or indeed reality) of political and media control, works of literature which question the benefits of these developments are thriving.
article.png
From traditional dystopias to teenage dystopias: Harry Potter as a bridge between two cultures par Eléonore Cartellier-Veuillen, publié le 25/04/2016
“From traditional dystopias to teenage dystopias: Harry Potter as a bridge between two cultures” seeks to explain the key role that the Harry Potter novels have played in the creation of the Young Adult dystopian genre which has flourished in recent years. It focuses on three aspects of dystopia (mind-control, death and resistance) to show how these themes taken from traditional dystopias are re-written to shape such contemporary works as Uglies, The Hunger Games and Divergent.
article.png
Nature after Wordsworth in Dance of the Happy Shades by Alice Munro par Christine Lorre-Johnston, publié le 01/03/2016
Alice Munro has acknowledged the influence of Wordsworth’s works and ideas on her own outlook, particularly where the idea of nature is concerned. Yet this cultural link has seldom been explored. Starting from this observation, this article proposes a few research directions by examining the concept of nature in Munro’s first collection of short stories, Dance of the Happy Shades (1968), successively as an experience of “the call of the wild,” then in the form of geology, and last, as overall framework for contemporary ecological changes.
article.png
The modern child and Romantic monstrosity in Doris Lessing’s The Fifth Child par Camille François , publié le 17/05/2011
This study investigates the articulation between "child" and "monster" in Lessing's novella, linking the text to a tradition of contemporary fiction about the child in which the much beloved literary figure inherited from the Romantics has become a frightening other. We hope to understand the Fifth Child 's shifting boundaries between the monstrous and the ideal, the "real child" and childhood as a locus of adult desires, by tracing these dichotomies back to Romantic myths of childhood, or the distorted versions that have made it to our time.
article.png
David Treuer: Forgotten World / Forgotten Words par David Treuer, publié le 18/09/2014
We speak confidently and playfully about the “death of the author” but not one wants to seriously consider the death of literature. But this is precisely what we risk when we treat literature as ethnography, or worse, as the last living remnants of what seem to be vanishing cultures. We don’t read novels, at any rate, to educate ourselves. Or if we do we shouldn’t. And if we do commit this soul error we don’t enjoy novels because of the information they contain. Rather, we enjoy them, we clutch novels to our very souls because they move us, surprise us, transport us, entertain us, shock us, and (ultimately) trick us into caring about people and places that don’t exist and never existed.
article.png
Taiye Selasi: On Emotions par Taiye Selasi, publié le 31/08/2015
How do writers succeed in submerging us in situations so unlike our own lives? I would argue that, as a reader, I have yet to encounter a situation in literature "unlike" my life. The demographic details may differ: Charlotte is a spider, I am a human; Teju Cole's narrators are men, I am a woman; many of Toni Morrison's characters are mothers, I am not. The list of things that I am not is long: white, male, a parent, a soldier, Chinese-speaking, South American, a witness to any war.
article.png
“Break On Through (to the Other Side)”: An Overview of The Historiography of U.S. Conservatism in the Sixties par Aurélie Godet, publié le 30/04/2012
Since the 1990s, a new generation of American historians has been exploring the “other,” counter-countercultural side of the 1960s, focusing on either the higher echelons of conservative power, the work of conservative militants at the grassroots, or on the ideas of specific conservative thinkers. This article aims to review some of the existing literature, while providing insight into what a comprehensive history of the conservative sixties should also include.
article.png
Minorities and democracy par Siddhartha Deb, publié le 17/01/2014
In 1916, the Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore delivered a series of lectures that would eventually be collected into the book, Nationalism. Tagore was writing in the glow of his own celebrity (he had just won the Nobel Prize for literature) and from within the heart of the crisis engulfing the modern world, two years into the slow, grim war that had converted Europe into a labyrinth of trenches covered over with clouds of poison gas. For Tagore, this was the tragic but inevitable outcome of a social calculus that valued efficiency, profit and, especially, the spirit of us versus them that bonded together the inhabitants of one nation and allowed them to go out, conquer and enslave other people, most of them members of no nation at all.
article.png
David Vann: Secret and subtext par David Vann, publié le 07/10/2013
All of the conventions of literary fiction can be successfully broken except one: there must be subtext, a second story beneath the surface. We don’t have to care about a protagonist or even really have a protagonist. We’re not limited to any particular style or structure. But our entire idea of literature being “about” something is based on a second narrative, something else that the surface narrative can point to. What’s interesting to me about this is that we live in a time when surface narratives are taking over. Blogs are generally so worthless for this one reason, that they lack subtext. The online world is, above all, earnest, saying exactly what it means.
article.png
Littérature et perspectives civilisationnelles par Floriane Bozon, publié le 15/06/2015
« It takes a great deal of history to produce a little literature », écrit Henry James, et le sujet qui nous intéresse aujourd'hui est celui de la corrélation entre littérature et civilisation en cours de Langue vivante, à savoir l'appréhension de la civilisation dans des cours à problématiques littéraires, tout comme l'exploitation possible de la littérature dans des cours à problématiques civilisationnelles. Qu'il s'agisse de choses écrites, ou de savoir issu de la chose écrite, ou encore de l'esthétique d'un texte écrit, lorsqu'il est question de langue étrangère, il est pour beaucoup d'entre nous difficile de dissocier la littérature du monde anglophone en général et donc de sa civilisation.
article.png