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Analysing front pages par Clifford Armion, publié le 20/01/2015
A front page tells you a lot about the contents of a newspaper and its attitude towards the news. Even if the traditional format difference between broadsheet newspapers and the more compact tabloids is disappearing – most papers are now printed in the same size – you can still easily recognize serious newspapers from tabloids. Tabloids usually have a large red masthead, very bold typeface and eye-catching pictures. The more serious papers have more text on the front-page and a plainer layout. Contrary to tabloids, broadsheets have no puns or jokes in the headlines and use a more formal language. Here are the main features you will find in any front-page…
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Analysing press images par Clifford Armion, publié le 13/01/2015
Newspapers and press websites NEED to illustrate their pages with a variety of images. Illustration, along with headlines, is what draws the attention of the reader/buyer/visitor. When looking at a press image, one has to wonder why that particular picture has been chosen and how it contributes to the news. Here are a few examples showing how those images function.
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Scotland’s No par Alistair Cole, publié le 29/09/2014
Shortly before the Scottish referendum on independence, I visited the impressive city of Glasgow, Scotland’s largest city. Though the Scottish referendum eventually produced a No of over 55%, the once second largest city in the Empire was one of only four districts to vote Yes (just over 53%). I had correctly judged the atmosphere in this city, but elsewhere the story was rather different. In 28 of the remaining 32 districts, the No vote carried the day, including in SNP stronghold areas such as Angus and Perthshire...
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The “obstinate resistance” of Woolf’s short stories par Christine Reynier, publié le 31/03/2009
I have often wondered why, although I have regularly gone back to Virginia Woolf's short stories, I still feel I do not know them very well. This is of course no other than the secret charm of Woolf's short stories: they are so hermetic or puzzling that one cannot help re-reading them; they are so varied that one keeps forgetting them; they are so challenging that one feels bound to delve into them again and again. They offer the "obstinate resistance" (Woolf 1988: 158) of the text that Woolf loves in Sir Thomas Browne's writings and that she analyses in her essay "Reading". The military metaphor of resistance might suggest that once the fortress of the text has been assaulted, it will surrender to the reader. However, the author makes it clear that such is not the case.
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William Hogarth - The Analysis of Beauty par Vincent Brault, publié le 04/06/2013
Reproductions commentées des deux oeuvres de la série "The Analysis of Beauty" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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Stylistics from Scratch: My ‘Take’ on Stylistics and How to Go About a Stylistic Analysis par Mick Short, publié le 24/04/2012
Mick Short was invited by Manuel Jobert as part of the tenth edition of the Discourse Analysis Conferences, organised by the Société de Stylistique Anglaise and Lyon 3. After giving some precious advice to students in stylistics and explaining the "foregrounding theory", he analysed a number of texts including the front page of a British tabloid, a poem by Robert Frost and a passage from Colum McCann’s Let the Great World Spin.
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Obscurity and Dylan Thomas’s early poetry par Iris Yaron-Leconte , publié le 07/10/2010
This article presents an analysis of Dylan Thomas’s early poem “When once the twilight locks no longer”, ignored by scholars, probably because of its extreme obscurity. The analysis is preceded by a theoretical discussion of obscurity in poetry and offers a definition of the term “obscure poem”. I argue that in reading an obscure poem significant changes are generated in the dynamics of text processing. In transgressing the rules of communication, Thomas’s poem raises the question as to how the reader is to decode it.
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Big Brother - A conversation with Lionel Shriver par Lionel Shriver, Clifford Armion, publié le 30/06/2015
The author of numerous novels, she won the Orange Prize for We Need to Talk About Kevin, adapted for the screen in 2011 by Lynne Ramsay. Her sarcastic flair is evident in Big Brother: Pandora, a highly successful businesswoman who hasn’t seen her brother—a seductive, boastful, jazz prodigy—in five years finds him obese, neglected, and compulsive. Lionel Shriver provides a keen analysis of our neurotic relationship with food and the alarming increase in obesity in our societies.
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Living, Thinking, Looking - A conversation with Siri Hustvedt par Siri Hustvedt, Clifford Armion, publié le 26/08/2014
Siri Hustvedt took part in the eighth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She answered our questions on her collection of essays, Living, Thinking, Looking.
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Narration in the Human Mind par Siri Hustvedt, publié le 16/02/2012
"Human beings are forever explaining themselves to themselves. This is the nature of our self-consciousness. We are not only awake and aware of the world around us, but are able to reflect on ourselves as actors in that world. We reason and we tell stories. Unlike our mammalian relatives who do not narrate their own lives, we become characters in our own tales, both when we recollect ourselves in the past and imagine ourselves in the future. Our ability to represent our experience in language - in those sounds and signs of our essential intersubjectivity - allows us the necessary symbolic alienation required for mental time travel..."
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Conscious and Unconscious Narrative Literature, Psychoanalysis and Neuroscience par Siri Hustvedt, Lionel Naccache, publié le 20/01/2012
Nous passons une grande partie de notre vie à élaborer des fictions, à nous raconter des histoires et à en raconter aux autres. La narration est profondément enracinée dans l'esprit humain, à un niveau à la fois conscient et inconscient. Produire une narration est une façon de donner du sens à l'expérience factuelle. Mais les fictions créées par le cerveau humain et celles que les romanciers imaginent sont-elles de même nature ? L'écrivain américain Siri Hustvedt et le neurobiologiste français Lionel Naccache exprimeront leurs points de vue originaux, pénétrants et empathiques sur cette question. We all spend our time constructing fictions, telling stories to ourselves and to others. Narration is deeply rooted in the human mind, at a conscious and unconscious level. Producing a narrative is a way of giving meaning to factual experience. Are the fictions created by the human brain and those imagined by novelists of the same nature? American writer Siri Hustvedt and French neurobiologist Lionel Naccache express their original, incisive and empathetic views on these questions.
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