Vous êtes ici : Accueil / Moteur de recherche

Recherche multi-critères

Liste des résultats

Il y a 13 éléments qui correspondent à vos termes de recherche.
Helen Oyeyemi reading from White is for Witching - Assises Internationales du Roman 2012 par Helen Oyeyemi, Patricia Armion, publié le 08/06/2012
Helen Oyeyemi took part in the sixth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She was kind enough to read an extract from White is for Witching, her stunning Neo-Gothic novel.
type-video.png
Helen Oyeyemi and the students of the Lycée Parc Chabrières par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 08/06/2012
As part of the Assises Internationales du Roman, Helen Oyeyemi went to the Lycée Parc Chabrière to meet the students of Emilie Michaux and Isabelle Bowley who had studied White is for Witching in class.
lienversunautresite.png
An interview with Helen Oyeyemi - Assises Internationales du Roman 2012 par Helen Oyeyemi, Patricia Armion, publié le 06/06/2012
Helen Oyeyemi took part in the sixth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. She answered our questions on White is for Witching, a stunning Neo-Gothic novel.
entretien.png type-video.png texte.png
Helen Oyeyemi, White is for Witching par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 27/08/2012
Helen Olajumoke Oyeyemi (born 10 December 1984) is a British novelist. Oyeyemi wrote her first novel, The Icarus Girl, while still at school studying for her A levels at Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School. Whilst studying Social and Political Sciences at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, two of her plays, Juniper's Whitening and Victimese, were performed by fellow students to critical acclaim and subsequently published by Methuen.
dossier.png
The Victorian Sensation Novel par Sophie Lemercier-Goddard, David Amigoni, publié le 02/05/2008
The sensation novel developed in Britain in the 1860s with Wilkie Collins as its most famous representative and has been increasingly presented as a sub-genre revealing the cultural anxiety of the Victorian period. Its complex narrative which relies on a tangle of mysteries and secrets introduces the character of the detective while heavily resorting to the Gothic machinery with the figure of the persecuted maiden and that of the villain.
son.png bibliographie.png
Aboriginal Australians and the white population, a troubled relationship par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 03/01/2012
Ce dossier sur les relations difficiles entre aborigènes et blancs en Australie regroupe trois ressources accompagnées d'exercices de compréhension et de production orales et écrites, ainsi que d'analyse d'image.
dossier.png exercice.png
Taiye Selasi: On Emotions par Taiye Selasi, publié le 03/09/2015
How do writers succeed in submerging us in situations so unlike our own lives? I would argue that, as a reader, I have yet to encounter a situation in literature "unlike" my life. The demographic details may differ: Charlotte is a spider, I am a human; Teju Cole's narrators are men, I am a woman; many of Toni Morrison's characters are mothers, I am not. The list of things that I am not is long: white, male, a parent, a soldier, Chinese-speaking, South American, a witness to any war.
article.png
Publishing during the Harlem Renaissance par Cécile Cottenet , publié le 18/02/2011
This article proposes to present the American literary and publishing scene of the 1920s, that favored the publication of Langston Hughes's first two volumes of poetry, The Weary Blues (1926) and Fine Clothes to the Jew (1927). I will first attempt to define the Harlem Renaissance, its temporal boundaries and leading figures, before highlighting the particular nexus of magazine editors, white patrons and publishers, that contributed to the flowering of the New Negro movement.
article.png
In Support of Affirmative Action par Randall Kennedy, publié le 06/02/2014
There are several good justifications for racial affirmative action in a society that has long been a pigmentocracy in which white people have been privileged and people of color oppressed. Affirmative action can ameliorate debilitating scars left by past racial mistreatment – scars (such as educational deprivation) that handicap racial minorities as they seek to compete with whites who have been free of racial subordination. Affirmative action can also counter racially prejudiced misconduct. True, an array of laws supposedly protect people in America from racial mistreatment. But these laws are notoriously under-enforced...
article.png
The Language of Gesture: Melville's Imaging of Blackness and the Modernity of Billy Budd par Klaus Benesch , publié le 04/01/2010
In light of recent studies of both the life of black seamen and of the role of blacks in the Enlightenment, the paper discusses the representation of African sailors in the work of Herman Melville, in particular in his unfinished manuscript Billy Budd, Sailor. As I argue, Melville's imaging of a "noble" black sailor in the opening chapter is crucial to the author's ongoing attempt to untangle the complex relationship of race and modernity. By invoking a non-totalitarian, gestural/visual aesthetics of blackness Melville not only reinforces his earlier critique of modernity's foundation in slavery; he also revivifies and, simultaneously, trans-forms the eighteenth-century tradition of visualizing blacks as tragic witnesses to the para-doxes of the enlightenment. In so doing, Melville couches his argument against racism in a 'gestural' (black) critique of white judgments on blacks that may well be read to foreshadow later, more radical gestures of black pride from zoot-suiters to the raised fists of black pan-thers or the corporeal self-fashioning of the gangster rapper.
article.png
L’espace post-apartheid dans les longs métrages de fiction sud-africains, une étude panoramique par Annael Le Poullennec, publié le 19/11/2014
Annael Le Poullennec propose une étude de l'espace sud-africain post-apartheid par l’intermédiaire des films. Après quelques rappels sur l’histoire de la ségrégation en Afrique du Sud et une brève introduction au cinéma sud-africain, elle évoque la problématique de l’espace, à l’échelle nationale et urbaine, dans la réinvention de la nation sud-africaine après la fin de l’Apartheid. Elle s’arrête notamment sur les dichotomies ville/campagne, township/suburb, cloisonnement/ouverture, en insistant sur l’image du déplacement, de l’évolution. Par l’analyse de films tels que Hijack Stories (Oliver Schmitz, 2001), The Wooden Camera (Ntshaveni WaLuruli, 2003), Tsotsi (Gavin Hood, 2005) et White Wedding (Jann Turner, 2009), elle pose les bases de ce qui constitue l’espace post-apartheid cinématographique dans le cinéma de fiction.
texte.png conference.png
Taking History Personnally par Cynthia Carr, publié le 12/12/2013
Two black men were lynched in Marion, Indiana, on the night of August 7, 1930. That was my father’s hometown, the town where I have my roots, and I heard this story when I was a little girl: The night it happened someone called my grandfather, whose shift at the Post Office began at three in the morning. "Don’t walk through the courthouse square tonight on your way to work," the caller said. "You might see something you don’t want to see." Apparently that was the punchline, which puzzled me. Something you don’t want to see. Then laughter. I was in my late twenties — my grandfather long dead — when I first came upon the photo of this lynching in a book. It has become an iconic image of racial injustice in America: two black men in bloody tattered clothing hang from a tree and below them stand the grinning, gloating, proud and pleased white folks.
article.png
Helen Oyeyemi on haunted house novels par Helen Oyeyemi, publié le 18/06/2012
"You read of extreme cases of jamais vu in the newspapers. There was one recently involving a husband who, after eighteen years of happy stability with his wife, told her he had a surprise for her. He blindfolded her, then ‘hit her over the head with the blunt end of an axe, fracturing her skull in three places.’ She survived and tried to forgive him, even vouched for his good character in court. The husband-turned-attacker, unable to explain his moment of terminal hostility, deferred to psychiatrists who offered the opinion that it was his past that had caused it. "
article.png