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"Language is a movement between scattered forms": Interview with Amitava Kumar par Amitava Kumar, Natacha Lasorak, publié le 25/10/2019
Amitava Kumar is an Indian writer and journalist who teaches literature at Vassar College. In this interview, he talks about his collection of essays Away: The Indian Writer as an Expatriate (2004) and his novel Immigrant, Montana (2017), and focuses on the notion of "home", immigration, the caste system and the political situation in India.
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Philosophy, Religion and Toleration par Sudipta Kaviraj, publié le 22/01/2015
Religious faith connects strongly held ethical ideals to the belief that these are the commands of God, or a power above human reason. This can make people of hard religious belief to be intensely intolerant. How can we easily accept those who violate or dismiss principles that we consider the foundational to the moral order of the universe? Thus it is quite possible that religious people might be pious inside their own religion, but hateful towards others. Though most religious faiths set down often similar principles of moral conduct, and encourage adherents to live by principles of fellowship, kindness, and love, these injunctions often get circumscribed by the larger idea of their religion being the only ‘true’ religion...
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Secularity in Indian History par Sudipta Kaviraj, publié le 12/01/2015
A peculiar feature of the modern world is the asymmetry in the knowledge of the other between the West and the non-West. Nonwestern societies know a great deal more about Western history than Western societies know about theirs. Religious principles clearly possess a peculiar quality: because they are held with particular reverence by religious individuals who see them as principles created, or at least sanctioned by God rather than men. Their denial by others consequently can cause unusually intense offense. Not observing a principle of a particular religion is considered by strict adherents of that religion as sacrilege. This is why conflict of religious principles gives rise to conflict of particular intensity and severity: it can also give rise to spectacular cruelty, because the object of one’s attack are entirely dehumanized, and considered enemies not of man or king or nation but of God himself.
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Are You Going to Write That in Your Book? par Siddhartha Deb, publié le 03/12/2013
Born in north-eastern India in 1970, Siddhartha Deb is the recipient of grants from the Society of Authors in the UK and has been a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Studies at Harvard University. His latest book, a work of narrative nonfiction, ((The Beautiful and the Damned)), was a finalist for the Orwell Prize in the UK and the winner of the PEN Open award in the United States. His journalism, essays, and reviews have appeared in Harpers, The Guardian, The Observer, The New York Times, Bookforum, The Daily Telegraph, The Nation, n+1, and The Times Literary Supplement.
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A world war par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 08/11/2013
Cette page aborde l'engagement des territoires de l'Empire britannique, notamment le Canada et l'Inde, dans la Première Guerre Mondiale. Une tâche est ensuite proposée aux apprenants à partir des informations présentées.
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Introduction à The God of Small Things d'Arundhati Roy par Florence Labaune-Demeule, publié le 21/03/2011
The God of Small Things, roman publié en 1997, permit à son auteur, la romancière indienne Arundhati Roy, de recevoir le Booker Prize la même année. Publié dans de nombreux pays et traduit en plus de quarante langues, ce roman a été applaudi à maintes reprises par la critique, notamment en raison de l'analyse subtile des relations humaines qui y est abordée. Comme le dit A. Roy elle-même, « The book really delves, very deep I think, into human nature. The story tells of the brutality we're capable of, but also that aching, intimate love [shared by twins]. »
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Death and Contemporary Political Imaginaries in Dalit Literature in India par Udaya Kumar, publié le 18/06/2018
Udaya Kumar (Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi) était Professeur invité à l’ENS de Lyon du 12 au 30 octobre 2017 et a donné trois conférences en anglais sur la littérature Dalit du Sud de l’Inde. La troisième de ces conférences porte sur la représentation des phénomènes de possession dans la littérature Dalit et sur l'impact politique du suicide.
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Caste and the Present: Modernity, Modernism and Dalit Writing in India par Udaya Kumar, publié le 27/04/2018
Udaya Kumar (Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi) était Professeur invité à l’ENS de Lyon du 12 au 30 octobre 2017 et a donné trois conférences en anglais sur la littérature Dalit du Sud de l’Inde. La première de ces conférences explore la représentation du système de castes dans la littérature Dalit.
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Reconfigurations of space in Partition novels par Sandrine Soukaï, publié le 19/09/2019
This article examines two Indian novels Clear Light of Day (1980) by Anita Desai and The Shadow Lines (1988) by Amitav Ghosh along with Burnt Shadows (2009) by Anglo-Pakistani novelist Kamila Shamsie, books written about the Partition of India that accompanied independence in 1947. Partition led to violence on an enormous scale; the exact number of people who were killed has never been ascertained, and estimates vary between one and two million. Partition also caused massive displacements of population, estimated between 12 and 18 million. This paper examines the way in which space – national, familial and communal – was divided and then reshaped by and through Partition. After discussing the fractures, ruptures and uprooting brought about by this trauma, I will consider the way in which diasporic writers devise fictional maps of memory of the past that foster exchanges across geographical borders.
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“When the Indians were there”: memory and forgetfulness in Alice Munro’s Dance of the Happy Shades par Lorie-Anne Rainville, publié le 01/03/2016
Le laboratoire ERIBIA et le département d’anglais de l’Université de Caen Normandie accueillaient le vendredi 8 janvier 2016 une journée d’étude autour du programme de l’agrégation externe d’anglais 2016. Les textes des communications sont réunis ici en deux parties : littérature et civilisation.
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David Treuer: Forgotten World / Forgotten Words par David Treuer, publié le 18/09/2014
We speak confidently and playfully about the “death of the author” but not one wants to seriously consider the death of literature. But this is precisely what we risk when we treat literature as ethnography, or worse, as the last living remnants of what seem to be vanishing cultures. We don’t read novels, at any rate, to educate ourselves. Or if we do we shouldn’t. And if we do commit this soul error we don’t enjoy novels because of the information they contain. Rather, we enjoy them, we clutch novels to our very souls because they move us, surprise us, transport us, entertain us, shock us, and (ultimately) trick us into caring about people and places that don’t exist and never existed.
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American Indians - A conversation with David Treuer par David Treuer, Clifford Armion, publié le 08/09/2014
David Treuer took part in the eighth edition of the Assises Internationales du Roman, organised by the Villa Gillet and Le Monde. He answered our questions on his involvement in the protection of Indian culture.
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Minorities and democracy par Siddhartha Deb, publié le 17/01/2014
In 1916, the Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore delivered a series of lectures that would eventually be collected into the book, Nationalism. Tagore was writing in the glow of his own celebrity (he had just won the Nobel Prize for literature) and from within the heart of the crisis engulfing the modern world, two years into the slow, grim war that had converted Europe into a labyrinth of trenches covered over with clouds of poison gas. For Tagore, this was the tragic but inevitable outcome of a social calculus that valued efficiency, profit and, especially, the spirit of us versus them that bonded together the inhabitants of one nation and allowed them to go out, conquer and enslave other people, most of them members of no nation at all.
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Taking History Personnally par Cynthia Carr, publié le 12/12/2013
Two black men were lynched in Marion, Indiana, on the night of August 7, 1930. That was my father’s hometown, the town where I have my roots, and I heard this story when I was a little girl: The night it happened someone called my grandfather, whose shift at the Post Office began at three in the morning. "Don’t walk through the courthouse square tonight on your way to work," the caller said. "You might see something you don’t want to see." Apparently that was the punchline, which puzzled me. Something you don’t want to see. Then laughter. I was in my late twenties — my grandfather long dead — when I first came upon the photo of this lynching in a book. It has become an iconic image of racial injustice in America: two black men in bloody tattered clothing hang from a tree and below them stand the grinning, gloating, proud and pleased white folks.
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William Hogarth - The Indian Emperor par Vincent Brault, publié le 21/01/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Indian Emperor" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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Across the ‘Wide Sargasso Sea’: Jean Rhys’s Revision of Charlotte Brontë’s Eurocentric Gothic par Sylvie Maurel, publié le 20/03/2008
In this article, Sylvie Maurel analyses the Gothic destabilizing machinery at work in Jean Rhys’s "Wide Sargasso Sea". The first Gothic element the author looks at is the demonic agency that haunts the novel. Colonial history lingers in Rhys’s world and accounts for some of the strange and unexpected phenomena that occur on the island. Actually, the narrative is under the double influence of a past set in an actual history of slavery and a future already written in the story of "Jane Eyre". Rhys’s characters have an uncanny prescience of what lies ahead and a sense that they cannot evade repetition. The motif of witchcraft is another element that links "WSS" to the Gothic. The motif goes beyond a picturesque reference to the West Indian context and functions as a metaphor of the relationship between language and power. Christophine’s witchcraft and Rochester’s Eurocentric discourse are two similar attempts at transforming the world through language. The power of language is also reflected in the way the novel constantly brings together multiple voices and conflicting views which seem to hide a secret rather than reveal a final truth. Rochester can only feel the presence of such a secret and risks delirium as he tries to get a grip on something that constantly eludes him.
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John Muir's Thousand-Mile Walk to the Gulf par Jean-Daniel Collomb , publié le 22/01/2007
Lorsque John Muir entame son gigantesque voyage à pied depuis Indianapolis jusqu'à Cedar Keys, en Floride, via le Kentucky, le Tennessee et la Georgie, il n'a que 29 ans mais il est déjà habitué à de longues randonnées dans les bois. Son goût de la liberté et son attrait pour les sciences naturelles l'ont en effet amené à parcourir l'arrière-pays de son Dunbar natal en Ecosse, les bois du Wisconsin de son adolescence ainsi que les denses forêts canadiennes. Pourtant, c'est un accident du travail, survenu en mars 1867 dans la fabrique de pièces détachées où il s'est révélé être un contremaître hors pair, qui l'incite à assouvir ce rêve de liberté intégrale. John Muir perd la vue pendant deux mois et se promet sur son lit malade qu'il s'échappera de l'univers mécanique où il s'est enfermé si la vue lui est rendue.
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