Vous êtes ici : Accueil / par_theme

Recherche multi-critères

Liste des résultats

Il y a 13 éléments qui correspondent à vos termes de recherche.
The United-States, climate, and the rest of the world par Jean-Daniel Collomb, publié le 25/11/2020
Dans le cadre d'un partenariat entre l'Université Grenoble Alpes, l'Ecole académique de formation continue (EAFC) et les IA-IPR d'anglais de l'académie de Grenoble, des professeurs d'anglais de lycée qui dispensent l'enseignement de spécialité LLCER Anglais monde contemporain ont assisté à une conférence intitulée "The United-States, climate, and the rest of the world" animée par Jean-Daniel Collomb.
type-video.png conference.png
Mobility and Immobility in Colm Tóibín’s Brooklyn: Migration as a Static Initiatory Journey par Coline Pavia, publié le 01/07/2020
Colm Tóibín’s Brooklyn centres on Eilis Lacey’s migration from Ireland to Brooklyn. The protagonist’s spatial mobility is accompanied by an identity change, as her self evolves when she settles in New York. Although she embarks on an initiatory journey through migration, Eilis faces various forms of immobility: the American territory resembles Ireland, and she is confronted to family duty when she thought she would escape it. This article therefore shows that the protagonist’s migration in Brooklyn is paradoxically mainly static, in terms of both space and identity. However, Eilis’s mobility still fosters a form of inner transformation as she is faced with a division between her Irish and American homes and between two selves that are irreconcilable.
article.png
Identity (Dana Spiotta) par Dana Spiotta, publié le 26/08/2015
I read obituaries. I love to read about people who were notable for one thing—say the woman who appears in a famous photo at Kent State. I am drawn to what people think of as failures: the guy who backed the wrong videotape format or the guy who lost an election after a tweet. I like to read about people whose lives took dramatic turns, like the guy who spent most of his life running an ice cream shop in New Jersey but secretly had a past life as a war criminal. I am fascinated by secret lives or multiplex identities. I imagine the day-to-day ordinary life, what does it feel like over time. I wonder about consequences, guilt, and redemption. I wonder how your past shapes who you are. And I wonder about the life that takes shape around an event. How a fleeting moment can change you, or maybe not. Maybe you are you no matter what.
article.png
The gun control debate in the US par James B. Jacobs, Claire Richard, publié le 08/04/2014
I consider myself a gun control skeptic. I do not believe, at this point in our history, with 300 millions firearms in private hands, and a constitutional right to keep and bear arms, and a political situation in which there is a very very small number of politicians who are willing to take a strong position on firearms, that there is a serious potential for regulatory controls. I don’t think that will happen. There is no magic bullet, if you can excuse the phrase, that will change American violence, but the good news is that it has been reduced substantially over the last 25 years....
type-video.png texte.png entretien.png
Going Solo par Eric Klinenberg, publié le 19/02/2013
About five years ago I started working on a book that I planned to call ALONE IN AMERICA. My original idea was to write a book that would sound an alarm about a disturbing trend: the unprecedented rise of living alone. I was motivated by my belief that the rise of living alone is a profound social change – the greatest change of the past 60 years that we have failed to name or identify. Consider that, until the 1950s, not a single human society in the history of our species sustained large numbers of people living alone for long periods of time. Today, however, living alone is ubiquitous in affluent, open societies. In some nations, one-person households are now more common than nuclear families who share the same roof. Consider America. In 1950, only 22 percent of American adults were single, and only 9 percent of all households had just one occupant. Today, 49 percent of American adults are single, and 28 percent of all households have one, solitary resident.
article.png
Reclaiming the streets, public space and quality of life in New York par Janette Sadik-Khan, Clifford Armion, publié le 11/01/2013
Mayor Bloomberg’s PlaNYC initiative was a thirty year plan to say ‘what do we need to do to ensure that a 9.4 million New York City works better than an 8.4 million New York City works today?’ so that when you open the door in the year 2030 you like what you see. That long term planning view, understanding the growth that’s going to happen, meant that we needed to change some fundamental things. One of the first things we needed to do was to look at our transport systems differently and use the lever of growth to modernise those transport systems.
entretien.png type-video.png texte.png
Declaration of Disinclinations par Lynne Tillman, publié le 11/12/2012
I like the theoretical ideal of neutrality, of non-hierarchical thinking. I’d like to be a writer, a person, but I am not. None of this naming is my choice. I’m a woman, “still” or I’m “only a woman.” “A good, bad woman, a silly, frivolous woman, an intelligent woman, a sweet woman, a harridan, bitch, whore, a fishmonger, gossipy woman. A woman writer.” What is “a woman writer”? Does “woman” cancel or negate “writer”? Create a different form of writer? Or does “woman” as an adjective utterly change the noun “writer”? “Man writer”? Not used. “Male writer,” rarely employed. Are there “man books” being read in “man caves?” OK, I declare: I’m a woman who writes, a person who writes. But how am I read?
article.png
What can we do to avert climate change? par Environmental Protection Agency, ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 16/09/2011
A partir d'une courte vidéo de l'agence américaine Environmental Protection Agency, traitant du changement climatique et des solutions pour y remédier, cette page propose des exercices de compréhension générale et détaillée, ainsi que de phonétique.
exercice.png type-video.png telechargement.png
Peter Ainsworth on sustainable energy and economic degrowth par Peter Ainsworth, ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 15/09/2011
A partir d'un article de Peter Ainsworth, ancien membre du parlement britannique et éphémère minstre de l'environnement, traitant des énergies durables et de la décroissance économique, cette page propose des exercices de compréhension générale et détaillée, ainsi que de grammaire.
article.png exercice.png
Publishing during the Harlem Renaissance par Cécile Cottenet , publié le 18/02/2011
This article proposes to present the American literary and publishing scene of the 1920s, that favored the publication of Langston Hughes's first two volumes of poetry, The Weary Blues (1926) and Fine Clothes to the Jew (1927). I will first attempt to define the Harlem Renaissance, its temporal boundaries and leading figures, before highlighting the particular nexus of magazine editors, white patrons and publishers, that contributed to the flowering of the New Negro movement.
article.png
Environmental issues: degrowth and progress par ENS Lyon La Clé des Langues, publié le 28/01/2011
Ce dossier sur les questions environnementales regroupe trois ressources accompagnées d'exercices de compréhension et de production orales et écrites, ainsi que d'analyse d'image.
dossier.png exercice.png
Reducing social democracy’s last redoubt: the privatisation and marketisation of the NHS in England par Colin Leys, publié le 12/02/2010
Since 1980 the NHS has been converted from a planned, integrated service, to a set of quasi-businesses operating in a health care market, in which an increasingly significant role is being played by for-profit corporations. This policy was initiated by the Conservatives under Margaret Thatcher and John Major but continued and driven much further by the Labour governments of Tony Blair and Gordon Brown. The paper outlines the sequence of initiatives through which the transformation has been accomplished and assesses what has driven the change, and why it has been so relatively easy to accomplish.
article.png
Promoting patients in narrative discourse: A developmental perspective par Harriet Jisa , publié le 18/12/2009
Languages provide speakers with a number of structural options for manipulating the expression of events in narrative discourse. Underlying narrative competence is the capacity to view events as dynamic actions composed of a bundle of elements such as, agent, patient, affectedness, etc. (Hopper and Thompson, 1980). This study examines the grammatical constructions used by children (5-6-, 7-8- and 10-11-year-olds) and adult speakers of Amharic, English, French and Hungarian to manipulate the expression of agent and patient participants in the expression of events. The narrative task used to elicit the data is composed of a series of pictures which recount the adventures of two principal characters (a boy and a dog) in search of their runaway frog (Frog, Where are you? Mayer 1969). Over the course of the story the boy and the dog encounter a host of secondary characters (a mole, an owl, a swarm of bees and a deer) and change participant status, going from controlling agent to affected patient of a secondary character's action. Our interest lies in the range of structures available in the languages studied and their use by children and adults in narrative discourse. We detail how children and adults native speakers of the four languages use topicalising constructions to promote the patient participant in an event to the starting point (Langacker, 1998) of the recounting of that event.
conference.png type-video.png