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In Support of Affirmative Action par Randall Kennedy, publié le 06/02/2014
There are several good justifications for racial affirmative action in a society that has long been a pigmentocracy in which white people have been privileged and people of color oppressed. Affirmative action can ameliorate debilitating scars left by past racial mistreatment – scars (such as educational deprivation) that handicap racial minorities as they seek to compete with whites who have been free of racial subordination. Affirmative action can also counter racially prejudiced misconduct. True, an array of laws supposedly protect people in America from racial mistreatment. But these laws are notoriously under-enforced...
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Pictures Versus the World par Barbie Zelizer, publié le 24/01/2014
For as long as pictures have been among us, they have generated an uneasy mix of suspicion and awe. Perhaps nowhere is that as much the case as with journalism, where pictures are implicated in the larger truth-claims associated with the news. Aligned with a certain version of modernity, pictures are expected to establish and maintain journalism as the legitimate platform for giving shape to events of the real world. Consider how public response to acts of terror, war and natural disaster is affected by decisions not to depict them. Without pictures to show the news, journalism’s capacity to render the real and make it accessible is compromised.
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Much Ado About Nothing (Joss Whedon) par Clifford Armion, publié le 20/01/2014
En adaptant cette comédie de Shakespeare, Joss Whedon marche dans les pas de l’illustre Kenneth Branagh qui avait fait de Much Ado un film remarqué en 1993. Le pari pouvait sembler ambitieux, même prétentieux, et pourtant le résultat est une comédie de mœurs toute en finesse qui respecte et met en valeur l’œuvre du dramaturge élisabéthain.
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Minorities and democracy par Siddhartha Deb, publié le 17/01/2014
In 1916, the Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore delivered a series of lectures that would eventually be collected into the book, Nationalism. Tagore was writing in the glow of his own celebrity (he had just won the Nobel Prize for literature) and from within the heart of the crisis engulfing the modern world, two years into the slow, grim war that had converted Europe into a labyrinth of trenches covered over with clouds of poison gas. For Tagore, this was the tragic but inevitable outcome of a social calculus that valued efficiency, profit and, especially, the spirit of us versus them that bonded together the inhabitants of one nation and allowed them to go out, conquer and enslave other people, most of them members of no nation at all.
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Feel the Sound, Thoughts on Music and the Body par Elena Mannes, publié le 19/12/2013
Our relationship with sound is an intimate one – arguably the most intimate with any of our five senses. We live in a visual society. Many people would say that sight is our primary sense. We hear before we see. In the womb, the fetus begins to develop an auditory system between seventeen and nineteen weeks. Already we are in a world of sound, of breath and heartbeat, of rhythm and vibration. Already, we are feeling the sound with our bodies.
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"As Many Fingers as Needed": The Body as Musician and its Fetishes par Peter Szendy, publié le 19/12/2013
"To comfortably acquire, so to speak, as many fingers as needed," said one of Bach’s sons, Carl Philipp Emanuel, in his Essay on the True Art of Playing the Keyboard (1753). And these words are remarkable, as long as we are prepared to take them literally, and not hastily consider them as one of the metaphors that adorn discourse about music and on the bodies that it evokes.
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Family Histories par Ian Buruma, publié le 16/12/2013
When I was at primary school in the Netherlands in the late 1950s and early 1960s, history was still taught as a story of great men, kings, generals, national heroes, and of course great villains, mostly foreigners. In our case, this meant a succession of Williams of Orange, Admiral Tromp, Philip II, the Duke of Alva, Napoleon, Hitler, and so on. As a reaction to this kind of thing, historians of the left began to focus on systems: fascist, late capitalist, communist, totalitarian. Hannah Arendt’s take on the Eichmann trial, though not the work of a typical leftist, contributed to this tendency, as did the work of Adorno. I have often suspected that they favored systemic analyses, because they couldn’t bring themselves to face what had gone so badly wrong specifically in their beloved Germany. The responsibility of Germans, such as Heidegger, was not the issue; it had to be a systemic failure.
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Taking History Personnally par Cynthia Carr, publié le 12/12/2013
Two black men were lynched in Marion, Indiana, on the night of August 7, 1930. That was my father’s hometown, the town where I have my roots, and I heard this story when I was a little girl: The night it happened someone called my grandfather, whose shift at the Post Office began at three in the morning. "Don’t walk through the courthouse square tonight on your way to work," the caller said. "You might see something you don’t want to see." Apparently that was the punchline, which puzzled me. Something you don’t want to see. Then laughter. I was in my late twenties — my grandfather long dead — when I first came upon the photo of this lynching in a book. It has become an iconic image of racial injustice in America: two black men in bloody tattered clothing hang from a tree and below them stand the grinning, gloating, proud and pleased white folks.
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Are You Going to Write That in Your Book? par Siddhartha Deb, publié le 03/12/2013
Born in north-eastern India in 1970, Siddhartha Deb is the recipient of grants from the Society of Authors in the UK and has been a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Studies at Harvard University. His latest book, a work of narrative nonfiction, ((The Beautiful and the Damned)), was a finalist for the Orwell Prize in the UK and the winner of the PEN Open award in the United States. His journalism, essays, and reviews have appeared in Harpers, The Guardian, The Observer, The New York Times, Bookforum, The Daily Telegraph, The Nation, n+1, and The Times Literary Supplement.
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In Praise of Babel par Robyn Creswell, publié le 22/11/2013
Like Jewish and Christian commentators, Muslim exegetes understood the Babel story to be a parable of how mankind’s hubris, in the form of a desire for knowledge or an attempt to reach the heavens, leads to divine punishment. The subsequent confusion of human idioms and scattering of peoples is a second fall from grace, an expulsion from the paradise of monolingualism. Henceforth, translation becomes at once necessary and impossible—impossible in the sense that no translation could ever match the transparency of the original Ur-Sprache. So the Islamic tradition, like the Judaic one in particular, comes to bear a tremendous nostalgia for the lost language of Eden.
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What Is Translation For? par Keith Gessen, publié le 19/11/2013
What is the place of the writer in the literary field of the home country? What contribution can this writer make to the literary field of the target or host country? It's important to understand that the answers to these questions will often be different: a writer can be a marginal figure in his home country and become a vital figure in another country. More often, of course, the reverse is true.
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Translation as Muse: Muse as Teacher par Mary Jo Bang, publié le 15/11/2013
how can reading not add to one’s experience, and in turn influence a person’s writing? And wouldn’t translation especially affect the brain, since translation involves the closest sort of reading, one where the mind simultaneously reads for meaning and tries to access the equivalent word or expression in another language. Wouldn’t reading the word “pelle” in Italian similarly send a message to the brain to access the synaptic record of all past sensory experience having to do with leather: black jacket, kid gloves, car seat, red belt with an alligator buckle, toy-gun holster, shoe shop. Wouldn’t the experiential knowledge of how those various leathers felt be carried along as the translator toggled between two different linguistic systems? And of course each of those leather memories would be connected to other associational memories, some quite rich in subjectivity.
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Reunion / L'ami retrouvé (1989) Jerry Schatzberg par Jerry Schatzberg, publié le 15/11/2013
Jerry Schatzberg started his career as a photographer and made his debut as a film director with Puzzle of a Downfall Child in 1970. Three years later he won the Cannes Film Festival Grand Prix for Scarecrow with Gene Hackman and Al Pacino. He was invited by the Festival Lumière to present Reunion (1989) which was screened in Lyon on 18 october 2013.
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We’re All Translators Now par Esther Allen, publié le 15/11/2013
As our language ceases to dominate cyberspace (our share of the Web has fallen to about 27%), we English speakers are hesitantly stepping out of our monolingual sphere and evincing renewed interest in foreign tongues. Language learning websites like Livemocha and Matador Network seem to crop up like mushrooms, Rosetta Stone is a publicly traded company whose stock is up 41% year to date, and last year’s top-rated YouTube video — remember? —was in Korean (with a few repetitions of “hey sexy lady” thrown in for nostalgia’s sake).
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David Vann: Secret and subtext par David Vann, publié le 07/10/2013
All of the conventions of literary fiction can be successfully broken except one: there must be subtext, a second story beneath the surface. We don’t have to care about a protagonist or even really have a protagonist. We’re not limited to any particular style or structure. But our entire idea of literature being “about” something is based on a second narrative, something else that the surface narrative can point to. What’s interesting to me about this is that we live in a time when surface narratives are taking over. Blogs are generally so worthless for this one reason, that they lack subtext. The online world is, above all, earnest, saying exactly what it means.
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Goldie Goldbloom: Portraits and Faces - Appearance and Disfigurement par Goldie Goldbloom, publié le 27/09/2013
Chekhov is well known for his impartial observations of his characters and for his grasp of “realism”. When I first read his description of the lady with the little dog, I discovered that she is “a fair-haired young lady of medium height, wearing a beret.” I was puzzled. This less than enthusiastic description of the woman Gurov will come to love leaves out many basic details such as the colour of Anna Sergeyevna’s eyes and whether she has an attractive figure. I wondered why Chekhov departs from the wordier earlier traditions of written portraiture, and how his simple sketch of Anna illustrated the “realism” for which he is known.
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Rebelling as a female in the 18th and 19th century literature. From Pamela to Jane Eyre: a path to equality? par Marion Lopez-Burette, publié le 23/09/2013
This article intends to study and compare the way Pamela, Richardson's early heroine of the novel genre, and Charlotte Brontë's romantic Jane, rebel. What follows will underscore the path trodden by female fictional characters in terms of shaping the individual, from the Enlightenment period to the romantic era. The patterns of entrapment and self-willed seclusion the protagonists are involved in function as incentives for rebellion. The ideals they rebel for play the role of living forces in a way that is meaningful to comprehend how the essence of rebellion evolved with time. No matter how much the protagonists' respective procedure may differ, from moral conservatism to personal answering of moral questions through rites of passage, the two female heroines are equally conscious of their value as human beings. Their handling of their hardships and their allegiance to God, however, points to the qualitative and quantitative evolution of the notion of equality.
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Kate O'Riordan: Visions of Ireland - A writer's view par Kate O'Riordan, publié le 17/09/2013
A Londoner by adoption, Kate O’Riordan grew up in the small city of Bantry on the west coast of Ireland. With Le Garçon dans la lune, published in 2008 and Pierres de mémoire, in 2009, O’Riordan signed two new remarkable opuses in which she questions family relationships. A novelist and short-story writer, Kate O’Riordan also writes for the cinema and continues to confirm her legitimate place among Irish authors who count. She came to the Villa Gillet to take part in a discussion on 'Ireland by Irish writers'.
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Les tubes de la Grande Guerre en Angleterre par John Mullen, publié le 27/08/2013
La vie des Britanniques il y a un siècle était souvent très dure. Comme à toute époque, le divertissement, et spécialement la musique, était essentiel pour toutes les classes sociales. Les couches privilégiées organisaient des concerts chez elles, aidées par leurs domestiques, ou allaient dans les salons de danse. La classe ouvrière rejoignait des fanfares ou des chorales, mais surtout allait au music-hall. Dans cet article nous avons choisi 10 chansons à succès des années de guerre qui peuvent illustrer les priorités de leur public. Pour chacune, nous fournissons un extrait des paroles, un enregistrement de l’époque, et une image.
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Keith Scribner: Representation and Psychology of Conflict par Keith Scribner, publié le 27/08/2013
In his Nobel Prize acceptance speech William Faulkner famously said that all real meaning in fiction comes from the human heart in conflict with itself. As a novelist I’m compelled by the internal conflicts inherent in the stories we tell ourselves in order to live and how those stories come to define us, how they allow us to justify our actions and possibly delude ourselves about who we are. Like any narrative, these stories help us shape otherwise disparate experiences into a comprehensible form. Over time we become so heavily invested in these narratives that when their veracity is challenged, the resulting conflict can be explosive.
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William Hogarth - Finis, on The Bathos par Vincent Brault, publié le 24/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Finis, on The Bathos" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Six Tickets par Vincent Brault, publié le 24/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Six Tickets" du graveur anglais William Hogarth, et reproductions détaillées des six vignettes composant cette oeuvre.
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Hugo Hamilton on memory and fiction par Hugo Hamilton, publié le 24/06/2013
It’s a stormy night in Dublin. My father comes into the bedroom to close the window. But the old sash window is rotten. As he tries pull it down, the wooden frame comes apart in his hands like a piece of fruit cake. The glass is smashed. So my father has to find a way to cover over the gaps. He looks around and picks up the nearest thing at hand. In the corner of the room there is a map of the world, a big rolled up school atlas which he’s kept from the time he was a schoolteacher. He rolls it out and nails the atlas up against the window frame. It’s a temporary solution, he says. Go to sleep. So that’s how I fall asleep, with the wind blowing across the world, flapping at the oceans and the continents. The world is there in the morning with the sun coming through.
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William Hogarth - The Medley par Vincent Brault, publié le 24/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Medley" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Earl of Charlemont par Vincent Brault, publié le 20/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Earl of Charlemont" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Shrimp-Girl par Vincent Brault, publié le 20/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Shrimp-Girl" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Lord Holland par Vincent Brault, publié le 20/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Lord Holland" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Debates on Palmistry par Vincent Brault, publié le 20/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Debates on Palmistry" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Captain Thomas Coram par Vincent Brault, publié le 20/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Captain Thomas Coram" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Sigismunda par Vincent Brault, publié le 20/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Sigismunda" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Politician par Vincent Brault, publié le 20/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Politician" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The House of Commons par Vincent Brault, publié le 20/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The House of Commons" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Time Smoking a Picture par Vincent Brault, publié le 20/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Time Smoking a Picture" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Stay-Maker par Vincent Brault, publié le 20/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Stay-Maker" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Charles Churchill par Vincent Brault, publié le 20/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Charles Churchill" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Four Heads from the Cartoons par William Hogarth, publié le 20/06/2013
"Four Heads from the Cartoons" est une gravure de William Hogarth numérisée pour la Clé des langues dans le cadre de "The Hogarth Project".
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William Hogarth - Tristram Shandy par Vincent Brault, publié le 18/06/2013
Reproductions commentées des deux oeuvres de la série "Tristram Shandy" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Times - Plate II par Vincent Brault, publié le 18/06/2013
Reproduction commentée du deuxième élément de la série "The Times" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - John Wilkes par Vincent Brault, publié le 18/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "John Wilkes" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Times - Plate I par Vincent Brault, publié le 18/06/2013
Reproduction commentée du premier élément de la série "The Times" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Weighing House par Vincent Brault, publié le 18/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Weighing House" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Artists' Catalogue par Vincent Brault, publié le 18/06/2013
Reproductions commentées des deux oeuvres de la série "The Artists' Catalogue" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - False Perspective par Vincent Brault, publié le 17/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "False Perspective" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Cockpit par Vincent Brault, publié le 17/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Cockpit" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Five Orders of Periwigs par Vincent Brault, publié le 17/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Five Orders of Periwigs" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Brook Taylor's Architecture par Vincent Brault, publié le 17/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Brook Taylor's Architecture" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Farmer's Return par Vincent Brault, publié le 17/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Farmer's Return" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Don Quixote par Vincent Brault, publié le 17/06/2013
Reproductions commentées des six oeuvres de la "Don Quixote" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - England par Vincent Brault, publié le 13/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "England" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Bench par Vincent Brault, publié le 13/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Bench" et du texte l'accompagnant du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - France par Vincent Brault, publié le 13/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "France" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Royal Masquerade par Vincent Brault, publié le 13/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Royal Masquerade" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Four Prints of an Election par Vincent Brault, publié le 13/06/2013
Reproductions commentées des quatre oeuvres de la série "Four Prints of an Election" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Crowns, Mitres, Maces, and c. par Vincent Brault, publié le 04/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Crowns, Mitres, Maces, and c." du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Moses Before Pharaoh's Daughter par Vincent Brault, publié le 04/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Moses Before Pharaoh's Daughter" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Analysis of Beauty par Vincent Brault, publié le 04/06/2013
Reproductions commentées des deux oeuvres de la série "The Analysis of Beauty" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Columbus Breaking the Egg par Vincent Brault, publié le 04/06/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Columbus Breaking the Egg" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Paul Before Felix par Vincent Brault, publié le 24/05/2013
Reproductions commentées des trois oeuvres de la série "Paul Before Felix" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Gin Lane par Vincent Brault, publié le 24/05/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Gin Lane" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Beer Street par Vincent Brault, publié le 24/05/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Beer Street" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Four Stages of Cruelty par Vincent Brault, publié le 24/05/2013
Reproductions commentées des quatre oeuvres de la série "Four Stages of Cruelty" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The March to Finchley par Vincent Brault, publié le 23/05/2013
Reproductions commentées des oeuvres "The March to Finchley" et "Receipt for The March to Finchley" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Gate of Calais (The Roast Beef of Old England) par Vincent Brault, publié le 23/05/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Gate of Calais (The Roast Beef of Old England)" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Hymen and Cupid par Vincent Brault, publié le 22/05/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Hymen and Cupid" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Mr. Ranby's House at Chiswick par Vincent Brault, publié le 22/05/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Mr. Ranby's House at Chiswick" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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The Essential David Shrigley par Johanna Felter, publié le 21/05/2013
"David Shrigley is a multidisciplinary artist who started his career in the early nineties self-publishing art books containing cartoon-like drawings for which he is mainly famous. Their trademarks, which are also recognizable in his varied artistic productions – clumsy execution, sloppy handwriting, disturbing or puzzling text, dark humour and uncanny atmosphere – helped Shrigley to gradually shape a clearly distinctive personality in his work which brought him out as one of the current key figures of British contemporary art scene."
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Victorian printing and William Morris’s Kelmscott Press par Laura Mingam, publié le 09/05/2013
During the Victorian period, the Industrial Revolution reached the field of printing, and profoundly altered book production in England. Even though technical innovations led to the creation of dazzling volumes, the artist designer William Morris denounced the corruption of traditional printing methods. As a reaction against the standards of his time, William Morris decided to open his own printing press, with the aim of “producing [books] which would have a definite claim to beauty”. The Kelmscott Press was to become a new landmark in the history of English printing.
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William Hogarth - A Country Inn-Yard par Vincent Brault, publié le 07/05/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "A Country Inn-Yard" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Industry and Idleness par Vincent Brault, publié le 07/05/2013
Reproductions commentées des douzes oeuvres de la série "Industry and Idleness" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Garrick in King Richard III par Vincent Brault, publié le 06/05/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Garrick in King Richard III" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Simon Lord Lovat par Vincent Brault, publié le 06/05/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Simon Lord Lovat" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Characters and Caricaturas par Vincent Brault, publié le 19/04/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Characters and Caricaturas" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Battle of the Pictures par Vincent Brault, publié le 19/04/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Battle of the Pictures" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Martin Folkes, Esq. par Vincent Brault, publié le 19/04/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Martin Folkes, Esq." du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Taste in High Life par Vincent Brault, publié le 19/04/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Taste in High Life" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Marriage à-la-mode par Vincent Brault, publié le 19/04/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Marriage à-la-mode" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Bishop Hoadly par Vincent Brault, publié le 19/04/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Bishop Hoadly" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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Kate Chopin as a Vocal Colourist: Vocalscapes in “Beyond the Bayou” par Manuel Jobert, publié le 16/04/2013
Authors sometimes pepper their writings with features of orality. Charles Dickens, Emily Brontë, Thomas Hardy or George Bernard Shaw have become household names renowned for this propensity to rely on the vocal medium. Orality, however, is an umbrella term that covers a wide range of possible meanings. In this paper, I shall mainly be concerned with direct speech and the way it represents spoken discourse proper.
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Amending Mariana in Measure for Measure par Michael Dobson, publié le 11/04/2013
With all of this provocative and intriguing play to choose from, complete with a beguiling cast list that includes figures as complex and compelling as Angelo, Isabella, and the Duke, I have chosen to discuss the person who may seem in her own right the least interesting of the six newly-married, betrothed-and-expecting, or potentially betrothed characters who dominate Measure for Measure’s final tableau: Mariana.
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Introduction à Measure for Measure par Estelle Rivier, Delphine Lemonnier-Texier, Isabelle Schwartz-Gastine, publié le 11/04/2013
Mettre en scène une pièce, dit Jean-François Sivadier interrogé sur le processus de création, c’est poser une hypothèse, et la mettre à l’épreuve du plateau, poursuivre le rêve que l’on a sur la pièce, et franchir le pas de son adaptation, accepter d’être confronté à l’écart entre le rêve et le plateau, tout en réussissant à ne pas perdre son rêve. Mettre en scène une pièce de Shakespeare, comme toute autre pièce de répertoire, c’est aussi se confronter à ses fantômes : ceux, manifestes, de ses mises en scène antérieures, et ceux, implicites, que l’on porte en soi en tant qu’artiste, les traversées que l’on a faites, les créations, les rôles antérieurs, l’histoire d’un parcours esthétique où cette pièce vient s’inscrire dans un cheminement, y (d)écrire un moment, une étape, une boucle peut-être...
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William Hogarth - The Enraged Musician par Vincent Brault, publié le 26/03/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Enraged Musician" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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Aux origines de Twelve Years a Slave (Steve McQueen, 2013) : le récit d’esclave de Solomon Northup par Michaël Roy, publié le 20/03/2013
Aux origines du film de Steve McQueen, Twelve Years a Slave (2013), il y a le récit de l’esclave américain Solomon Northup (1853). Cet article présente d’abord le récit d’esclave et situe cette forme littéraire dans le paysage idéologique de l’Amérique d’avant la guerre de Sécession ; il détaille ensuite l’histoire éditoriale de Twelve Years a Slave ; il donne enfin quelques repères dans l’œuvre et évoque son devenir critique.
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Care: A New Way of Questioning our Societies par Joan Tronto, publié le 15/03/2013
"In the United States, care became a focus of feminist research in the early 1980s. As “second wave” feminists realized that mere formal equality was insufficient, they began to think more deeply about what was required for the genuine inclusion of women."
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William Hogarth - Strolling Actresses Dressing par Vincent Brault, publié le 12/03/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Strolling Actresses Dressing" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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A global open-circuit television system going live? par Jeffrey Rosen, publié le 11/03/2013
I was at a conference at Google not long ago, and the head of public policy, said he expected that before long, Google and Facebook will be asked to post online live feeds to all the public and private surveillance cameras in the world, including mobile cameras mounted on drones. Imagine that Facebook responds to public pressure and decides to post live feeds, so they can be searched online, as well as archiving the video in the digital cloud.
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William Hogarth - Four Times of the Day par Vincent Brault, publié le 11/03/2013
Reproductions commentées des quatre oeuvres de la série "Four Times of the Day" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Lecture par Vincent Brault, publié le 01/03/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Lecture" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Distressed Poet par Vincent Brault, publié le 01/03/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Distressed Poet" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Pool of Bethesda and The Good Samaritan par Vincent Brault, publié le 01/03/2013
Reproductions commentées des oeuvres "The Pool of Bethesda" et "The Good Samaritan" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Company of Undertakers par Vincent Brault, publié le 21/02/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Company of Undertakers" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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After Obamacare: The New Stakes of US Healthcare Policy par Alondra Nelson, publié le 21/02/2013
The new stakes for healthcare policy in the U.S. are apparent in what Obamacare concretized — the further privatization and stratification of healthcare—and what it left unsaid—the assertion of a right to health. Solutions lie outside of the formal domain of policy and in the realm of ethics and human rights. Yet, it is hard to imagine the application of these remedies at a time when life can be taken with impunity and in a world in which the US kills through drone warfare with each bomb carrying not only the threat of death but also the message that some lives matter less than yours or mine.
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Going Solo par Eric Klinenberg, publié le 19/02/2013
About five years ago I started working on a book that I planned to call ALONE IN AMERICA. My original idea was to write a book that would sound an alarm about a disturbing trend: the unprecedented rise of living alone. I was motivated by my belief that the rise of living alone is a profound social change – the greatest change of the past 60 years that we have failed to name or identify. Consider that, until the 1950s, not a single human society in the history of our species sustained large numbers of people living alone for long periods of time. Today, however, living alone is ubiquitous in affluent, open societies. In some nations, one-person households are now more common than nuclear families who share the same roof. Consider America. In 1950, only 22 percent of American adults were single, and only 9 percent of all households had just one occupant. Today, 49 percent of American adults are single, and 28 percent of all households have one, solitary resident.
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William Hogarth - The Sleeping Congregation par Vincent Brault, publié le 19/02/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Sleeping Congregation" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Sancho at a Magnificent Feast par Vincent Brault, publié le 19/02/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Sancho at a Magnificent Feast" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Woman Swearing a Child par Vincent Brault, publié le 19/02/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Woman Swearing a Child" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Rake's Progress par Vincent Brault, publié le 18/02/2013
Reproductions commentées de la série "The Rake's Progress" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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Livery, liberty, and the original staging of Measure for Measure par Andrew Gurr, publié le 17/02/2013
We know that Shakespeare lived in Bishopsgate through his first years in London, in the parish of St. Helens. Located just to the north of the Tower, he is on record as paying his dues in this parish. Not far from St. Helen’s was St. Botolph’s in Aldgate, another local church where Shakespeare had neighbourly connections. Not far from there, slightly to the east and north of the Tower, in the parish of St. Aldgates Without (meaning outside the city walls) there had once been the greatest of the three English Franciscan nunneries, known as the Minories, the London nunnery of the Order usually called the Poor Clares. This site, though no longer a nunnery, was still there when Shakespeare came to live nearby in 1590 or so...
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William Hogarth - Rich's Triumphant Entry par Vincent Brault, publié le 15/02/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Rich's Triumphant Entry" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - Midnight Modern Conversation par Vincent Brault, publié le 15/02/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "Midnight Modern Conversation" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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William Hogarth - The Man of Taste par Vincent Brault, publié le 15/02/2013
Reproduction commentée de l'oeuvre "The Man of Taste" du graveur anglais William Hogarth.
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