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30 June 2017 - Trump's New Travel Ban Comes into Effect

Travel ban 2.0 in effect, court challenges begin
Laura Jarrett and Elise Labott (CNN Politics, 29/06/2017)

After months of winding through the courts, the so-called "watered-down," revised version of President Donald Trump's fiercely litigated travel ban finally went into effect at 8 p.m. ET Thursday.

Less than an hour before the ban was slated to begin, an emergency motion was filed in federal court by the state of Hawaii, which contests the Trump administration's plan to exclude certain categories of foreign nationals that the state believes are allowed to enter the country under existing court rulings.

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Redefining "Family"
 
Travel ban takes effect as State Department defines ‘close family’
Carol Morello (The Washington Post, 29/06/2017)
 
After five months of bitter legal squabbling, the Trump administration’s modified travel ban took effect Thursday night under new guidelines designed to avert the chaos of the original rollout. But the rules will still keep many families split and are likely to spawn a new round of court fights.

The State Department on Thursday announced new criteria to determine who will be allowed to enter the United States as a visitor or a refugee. The travel restrictions are temporary for now — 90 days for visitors and 120 days for refugees coming from six Muslim-majority countries: Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. But the administration took a particularly strict interpretation of a Supreme Court ruling Monday that only those with “bona fide” relationships, such as close family members, can enter the country.

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Bona Fide Connection to the U.S

Protesters Want America To Know Trump’s Muslim Ban Will Rip Families Apart
Christopher Mathias (The Huffington Post, 29/06/2017)

Rama Issa-Ibrahim says she and her fiance had planned to get married in the next few months. Not anymore.

The Trump administration on Thursday night began enforcing travel restrictions, days after the Supreme Court partially reinstated President Donald Trump’s ban on travel and immigration by citizens of six majority-Muslim countries: Libya, Somalia, Iran, Yemen, Sudan, and Syria.

Issa-Ibrahim, 29, said she has a lot of extended family members who are Syrian nationals. Some are still in war-torn Syria, and there’s a cousin in Lebanon, and another cousin living as a refugee in Austria.

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Supreme Court

New Travel Ban Rules Create Awkward Family Dynamics
Noah Feldman (Bloomberg, 29/06/2017)
 
President Donald Trump’s administration has issued guidelines through the State Department for who will be exempt from the travel ban from six majority Muslim countries, which the U.S. Supreme Court allowed Monday to partly go into effect. The guidelines are highly arbitrary in defining what counts as a family relationship that merits exemption. For example, your mother-in-law is close enough to come into the U.S., but not your grandmother, a blood relative without whom you wouldn’t exist.

That’s because the Trump administration wants to keep out as many people as it can. But it’s also the result of the Supreme Court’s decision, which created a brand new legal category of “bona fide relationship” while defining it only in connection with the plaintiffs in the case. The result will be practical difficulties as well as more litigation in the months before the justices directly address the legality of the ban.

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Last update June 30, 2017
Créé le June 30, 2017
ISSN 2107-7029
DGESCO Clé des Langues