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23 January 2017 - Women's March Floods Washington

Many find solidarity — and catharsis — at the Women’s March on Washington
Ellen McCarthy, Lavanya Ramanathan and Maura Judkis (The Washington Post, 22/01/2017)

Katie Giarratano’s tears caught her by surprise.

She thought she might cry when President Trump was sworn in. Or when Gloria Steinem spoke. But the moment her cheeks grew wet was when she pushed her way through a crowd of strangers on Independence Avenue — a crowd so thick that it was nearly impossible to move, so full of pink hats that it looked like a morning horizon.

The speakers and celebrities were what garnered headlines, but the Women’s March on Washington will be remembered most for the numbers. Numbers that exceeded expectations and preparations and the previous day’s inauguration.

Read on...

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Stronger Together
 
Scenes From the Women's March on Washington
Sarah Larson (The New Yorker, 22/01/2017)
 
The Women’s March on Washington, yesterday: women, men, girls, boys, trans people, old, young, black, white, brown, Asian, gay, straight, sighted, blind, babies in strollers, people in wheelchairs, people with walkers, immigrants, second-generationers, students, Canadians, Muslims, Jews, Rosie the Riveters, Princess Leias, everybody coming from everywhere. My little group—two women, one man—was dressed plainly and practically, various survival items tucked into our pockets and our tiny, march-approved bags. Around 8:30 A.M. at the Metro in Bethesda, streams of people, pink hats everywhere. A man in an Abe Lincoln getup, complete with stovepipe hat, held a sign that said “STANDING TALL WITH WOMEN.” Friends texted and posted photos of their own pink-hatted planefuls, busfuls, carfuls, coming in from north, south, and west. At each Metro stop, big crowds on each platform, too many to fit, and hearty cheering at every influx of people—“Whoo!”

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No arrests
 
Women's March on Washington yields zero arrests: report
Brooke Seipel (The Hill, 22/01/2017)
 
No arrests were made during the Women's March on Washington Saturday, according to a top official in the capital.

The peaceful protest, which had an estimated 500,000 in attendance, was so much larger than its expected size that the march route had to be altered and couldn't pass the White House as planned.

D.C. Homeland Security Director Christopher Geldart told NBC news that despite the massive crowds, no arrests were made. On Friday after the inauguration, protests led to the arrests of more than 200 people and the use of pepper spray and stun grenades by police.

Read on...
 
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Next Step
 
After Success of Women’s March, a Question Remains: What’s Next?
Susan Chira and Jonathan Martin (The New York Times, 22/01/2017)
 
More than a million people who turned out on Saturday for women’s marches in all 50 states have put down their placards, taken off their pink hats and ended their chants after what was an extraordinary display of dissent against the Trump presidency.

A critical question remains: What happens now?

The challenge facing the organizers is how to channel the resolve and outrage of an organic protest into action that produces political change. That goal has eluded other popular movements, from Occupy Wall Street to Black Lives Matter. It is no less daunting now, given that Democrats were unable to defeat President Trump in 2016 despite an emerging demographic majority.

The organizers are trying. Within minutes after the march in Washington ended at sundown on Saturday, its leaders convened a four-hour pep rally and networking session called “Where Do We Go From Here?” On Sunday, Planned Parenthood held a training session for 2,000 organizers on turning mobilization into political action, with health care atop its priority list. David Brock, the Democratic activist, assembled a group of about 120 leading liberal donors in Aventura, Fla., to hear plans for lawsuits and other challenges to Mr. Trump.

Read on...
 
 
Last update January 23, 2017
Créé le January 23, 2017
ISSN 2107-7029
DGESCO Clé des Langues