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19 June 2017 - Bill Cosby judge declares mistrial; prosecutor vows to retry case

Bill Cosby’s Sexual Assault Case Ends in a Mistrial
Graham Bowley, Richard Pérez-Peña and John Hurdle (The New York Times, 17/06/2017)

The judge in the sexual assault trial of Bill Cosby declared a mistrial Saturday after jurors reported being hopelessly deadlocked after six days of deliberations, bringing an inconclusive end to this phase of one of the highest-profile cases in recent history.

District Attorney Kevin R. Steele of Montgomery County in Pennsylvania immediately vowed to put Mr. Cosby on trial again.

The outcome denied vindication to either the defendant or the dozens of women who have accused Mr. Cosby, one of the world’s best-known entertainers, of assaulting them over a span of decades.

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Victims
 
Bill Cosby's Accusers Have Not Lost Hope Despite Mistrial
Charlotte Alter (Time Magazine, 18/06/2017)
 
Bill Cosby's sexual assault case ended in a mistrial on Saturday, when jurors said they could not reach a decision after six days of deliberations. For Cosby's accusers, the news brought neither the closure of a conviction nor the distress of an acquittal — but something in between.

"I was relieved when they said mistrial, because it means that it wasn’t an acquittal," says Linda Kirkpatrick, who is not involved in the current case but is one of dozens of women who have accused the entertainer of sexual assault.

Despite the many allegations, Cosby was on trial for the alleged assault of just one woman: Andrea Constand, a former Temple University basketball coach who accused Cosby of drugging and assaulting her at his home in 2004. The judge allowed only one other alleged victim testify against Cosby to help establish a pattern of behavior, even though prosecutors had hoped to include testimony from 13 other alleged victims. Lawyers are hoping that the judge might reconsider when District Attorney Kevin R. Steele brings the case to trial again — giving other accusers a chance to add their testimony against Cosby.

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New Trial

What’s next for the Bill Cosby sex-assault case?
Manuel Roig-Franzia (The Washington Post, 18/06/2017)

They almost surely will meet again in a court of law.

One more time, the lanky former jock with the loose-limbed gait and the mound of curly hair is likely to sit across a courtroom from the lumbering and aging comedian who has made an elegant wooden cane his signature prop on the most dangerous stage of his storied career.

The mistrial declared Saturday morning in Norristown, Pa., set the scene for a courtroom rematch between Andrea Constand, a former women’s professional basketball player, and Bill Cosby, the comic legend who she says drugged and sexually assaulted her. Even though the machinations of a retrial would be handled by attorneys, the ultimate decision of the next panel of jurors will be, once again, heavily dependent on their assessment of Constand and Cosby.

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Sexual Predator

Bill Cosby Isn’t The Exception, He’s The Rule
Emma Gray (The Huffington Post, 17/06/2017)

After 52 hours of deliberations, the jury in the criminal case brought against Bill Cosby by Andrea Constand was unable to reach a unanimous consensus. On Saturday morning, Judge Steven O’Neill declared a mistrial.

Constand says that, in 2004, Cosby tricked her into taking three blue pills that incapacitated her and proceeded to sexually assault her. In December 2015, nearly 10 years after settling a civil suit with Constand in 2006 for an undisclosed sum, Cosby was charged with three counts of aggravated indecent assault.

Although Cosby wasn’t acquitted, and Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin R. Steele said that he planned to retry the case, a mistrial is unquestionably a win for the 79-year-old actor and comedian. A retrial will take time ― and it means that Constand will have to testify about her trauma again.

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Last update June 19, 2017
Créé le June 19, 2017
ISSN 2107-7029
DGESCO Clé des Langues