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15 September 2017 - Trump signs resolution condemning bigotry and violence in Charlottesville

Trump signs resolution condemning white supremacy
Eli Watkins (CNN, 15/09/2017)

Hours after he returned to rhetoric equating violence from white supremacists with those protesting them, the White House said Thursday that President Donald Trump signed a resolution condemning white supremacy.

In the White House statement, Trump said he opposed bigotry in all forms.

"No matter the color of our skin or our ethnic heritage, we all live under the same laws, we all salute the same great flag, and we are all made by the same almighty God," Trump said.

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Joint Resolution
 
The Charlottesville resolution and the role of media in violence
Jens Erik Gould (The Huffington Post, 14/09/2017)
 
The sources we analyzed on Congress’ joint resolution on the violence in Charlottesville accurately reported the contents of the bill. However, they gave more weight to the part of the bill that calls for Trump’s condemnation of white supremacists than they did to the practical steps the bill proposes to reduce violence (e.g. improving reporting of hate crimes and conducting thorough investigations of them). The emphasis may suggest that whether Trump denounces these groups or not is of higher import.

In some outlets, condemnation became the focal point. For example, Al Jazeera’s headline said, “Congress challenges Trump to address white supremacy.”


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"Both Sides"

Trump Resurrects His Claim That Both Sides Share Blame in Charlottesville Violence
Mark Landler (The New York Times, 14/09/2017)

President Trump thrust himself back into the racial storms of Charlottesville on Thursday, repeating his charge that those who resisted the neo-Nazis and white supremacists were as much to blame as the alt-right crowds who marched on the Virginia college town.

Mr. Trump was characterizing his side of a conversation on Wednesday with Senator Tim Scott of South Carolina, during which Mr. Scott, the Senate’s only black Republican, confronted the president on his claim that “both sides” were responsible for the violence that followed a torchlight protest against the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee.

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'Pretty Bad Dudes'

Trump revives criticism of 'both sides' in Charlottesville
Ben Jacobs (The Guardian, 14/09/2017)
 
Donald Trump on Thursday reverted to his controversial “both sides” rhetoric about white supremacist violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, that led to the death of a woman last month.
'No Fascist USA!': how hardcore punk fuels the Antifa movement
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A spokesperson for Tim Scott, the African American Republican senator from South Carolina who met Trump at the White House on Wednesday to discuss America’s racist past and present, said in response: “Rome wasn’t built in a day.”

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Last update September 15, 2017
Créé le September 15, 2017
ISSN 2107-7029
DGESCO Clé des Langues