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06 October 2017 - Kazuo Ishiguro Is Awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature

Kazuo Ishiguro wins the Nobel prize in literature 2017
Hannah Ellis-Petersen and Alison Flood (The Guardian, 06/10/2017)

The British author Kazuo Ishiguro said he was both honoured and “taken completely by surprise” after he was named this year’s winner of the 2017 Nobel prize in literature, even initially wondering if the announcement was a case of “fake news”.

Ishiguro, author of novels including The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go, was praised by the Swedish Academy for novels which “uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world” and were driven by a “great emotional force”.

Despite being among those tipped for the prize, whose previous winners include Seamus Heaney, Toni Morrison, Doris Lessing and Pablo Neruda, Ishiguro told the Guardian he had been completely unprepared for the announcement and had even doubted at first if it was true.

Read on...


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The New Yorker
 
Kazuo Ishiguro, the 2017 Nobel Prize Winner in Literature, in The New Yorker
David Haglund (The New Yorker, 05/10/2017)
 
“Kazuo Ishiguro writes a prose of provoking equilibrium—sea-level flat, with unseen fathoms below.” So begins James Wood’s review, from 2015, of Ishiguro’s most recent novel, “The Buried Giant.” This morning, Ishiguro was announced as the recipient of 2017’s Nobel Prize in Literature. Ishiguro, who was born in Nagasaki, Japan, in 1954, and moved to England when he was five, is the author of seven novels, as well as the collection “Nocturnes: Five Stories of Music and Nightfall.”

He has published one story in The New Yorker, “A Village After Dark,” which appeared in the magazine in 2001. Set in England, it’s the tale of a man named Fletcher, who returns to a village where, “long ago,” he says, “I had lived and come to exercise such influence.” As with much of Ishiguro’s writing, many things that a reader might want to know are withheld, or kept under the surface. Ben Marcus discussed the story with the magazine’s fiction editor, Deborah Treisman, on The New Yorker’s Fiction Podcast, in 2011. “We just don’t know anything,” Marcus said, of “A Village After Dark.” “It’s the itch of wanting to know that is, I think, what’s so pleasurable about the story.”


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Stories

Kazuo Ishiguro’s Mysterious Stories Unsettle Our Sense of Humanity and Belonging
Laura Miller (Slate, 05/10/2017)
 
Kazuo Ishiguro, recipient of the 2017 Nobel Prize for literature, is the slyest kind of internationalist. Some forms of literary greatness assemble themselves out of specificity, reaching for the eternal by reproducing the experience of living in a particular place at a particular time. Nobelists like Seamus Heaney, Tomas Tranströmer, Toni Morrison, and Alice Munro write out of this impulse, producing the opposite of what the critic Tim Park deplores as “the dull new global novel,” the sort of book that travels smoothly across borders because everything in it can so readily be translated.

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Flattered and Honoured

Kazuo Ishiguro: Nobel Literature Prize is 'a magnificent honour'
(BBC News, 05/10/2017)
 
The novelist was praised by the Swedish Academy as a writer "who, in novels of great emotional force, has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world".

His most famous novels The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go were adapted into highly acclaimed films. He was made an OBE in 1995.

The 62-year-old writer said the award was "flabbergastingly flattering".

He has written eight books, which have been translated into over 40 languages.

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Last update October 6, 2017
Créé le October 6, 2017
ISSN 2107-7029
DGESCO Clé des Langues